Tag: Colorado

Colorado Lawmakers Approve Language Permitting Medical Cannabis Use in Schools

Colorado Lawmakers Approve Language Permitting Medical Cannabis Use in Schools | NORML

DENVER, CO — House and Senate lawmakers have overwhelmingly approved legislation, House Bill 1373, that seeks to permit qualified patients access to the use formulations of medical cannabis while on school grounds. The measure now awaits action by Gov. John Hickenlooper, who indicated that he would sign the measure into law. “My son, if he needed […]

Colorado Lawmakers Approve Language Permitting Medical Cannabis Use in Schools | The Daily Chronic


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Colorado Passes Law to Help Young Medical Marijuana Patients

Colorado Passes Law to Help Young Medical Marijuana Patients

School Districts Must Now Establish Policies to Facilitate On-Campus Administration of Medical Marijuana

DENVER, CO — In a unanimous vote Tuesday, the Colorado Senate approved legislation mandating that school districts establish a policy to ensure that young medical marijuana patients can take their medicine on school grounds.

As a show of respect, the Senate directed their ‘yes’ votes to families and proponents in the gallery.

Last week the Senate Education Committee passed the legislation via a rare standing vote.  The bill had previously passed in the House.

House Bill 1373 requires school districts to establish policies that allow use of non-smokeable medical marijuana for young patients in Colorado public schools.  The guidelines in the law do not require school employees to administer the marijuana-infused products but suggests parents or primary caregivers on campus administer the medicine.

The legislation, known as “Jack’s Law”, concerns 15-year-old Jack Splitt.  Jack suffers from spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy and dystonia.  Jack and his mother Stacey Linn successfully fought last year to allow school districts to establish medical marijuana policy – but after none did, more legislation was immediately required to get things moving.

School districts hesitated after last year’s law, titled Jack’s Amendment, stoked unfounded fears regarding federal funding.

The current legislation ensures school districts can opt out of the policy if they can show an actual loss of federal funding, even though that’s unlikely to occur.

“We don’t have time to wait for school districts to do the right thing,” said Stacey Linn, mother of Jack Splitt and executive director of CannAbility Foundation. “Jack and many other children need their medicine to get through the day and learn, and it’s imperative that those responsible for teaching them show compassion and understanding.”

“The medical benefits of marijuana are undeniable at this point,” said Art Way, state director, Colorado, for the Drug Policy Alliance. “We applaud the sponsors of this legislation for saying enough is enough and establishing a baseline of support for the nearly 300 children in our state who need marijuana infused products to help them function while in school.”

HB 1373 now heads to Gov. Hickenlooper, who is expected to sign the bill.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Our Recent Supreme Court Victory and What It Means

Our Recent Supreme Court Victory and What It Means

The recent decision by the US Supreme Court to refuse to hear a challenge to the Colorado marijuana legalization law was a significant victory for those who favor legalizing marijuana and a significant set-back for those who thought the federal courts might help them hold on to the increasingly unpopular policy of criminal prohibition. The name of the case was States of Nebraska and Oklahoma v. State of Colorado.

Original Jurisdiction

First, here’s a brief lesson in Supreme Court jurisprudence. Nearly all cases that make it to the US Supreme Court have managed to work their way from the US District Court to the US Court of Appeals, and then, finally, if the court decides to hear the case, to the high court itself. This is a process that usually requires a few years to reach a final conclusion.

The Supreme Court also has what is called “original jurisdiction” to hear cases and controversies arising between the states. One state may petition the court to hear a suit against another state without having to start at the trial court level. Typically these “original jurisdiction” suits involve disagreements over boundaries or the use of river water that flows from one state to another.

This is the procedure attempted when the state attorneys general from Oklahoma and Nebraska, in late 2014, filed suit against the state of Colorado, challenging the validity of the Colorado marijuana legalization law.

Specifically, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, a Republican, and Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning, also a Republican, alleged that marijuana from Colorado was finding its way illegally to their states, causing their courts, law enforcement agencies and jails to be overburdened. “The State of Colorado has created a dangerous gap in the federal drug control system,” the two states complained in their lawsuit.

“The state of Colorado authorizes, oversees, protects and profits from a sprawling $100-million-per-month marijuana growing, processing and retailing organization that exported thousands of pounds of marijuana to some 36 states in 2014,” they said. “If this entity were based south of our border, the federal government would prosecute it as a drug cartel.”

Attorneys for both the state of Colorado (Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman, a Republican) and the Obama administration urged the Supreme Court not to accept the case, saying it was not a conflict between the states and thus not eligible for “original jurisdiction.” They argued the case involved harm allegedly being caused by individual lawbreakers, not the state of Colorado.

“Entertaining the type of dispute at issue here — essentially that one State’s laws make it more likely that third parties will violate federal and state law in another State — would represent a substantial and unwarranted expansion of this Court’s original jurisdiction,” U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli Jr. wrote in his brief to the court.

On March 21, the Supreme Court announced they would refuse to hear the case on a 6-2 vote (four votes are required for the court to agree to hear a case), with Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito in the minority.

The decision to reject the case on original jurisdiction does not resolve the underlying substantive issues, but it means the two states, if they wish to pursue this line of reasoning further, must first file their suit at the trial court level and work through the court of appeals, before again asking the Supreme Court to rule. There will be no legal short cut for this challenge.

What if the Plaintiffs Had Won?

It is worth considering for a moment what the plaintiffs might have achieved had they convinced the Supreme Court to hear the case, or further convinced the court their legal challenge had merit.

The result, instead of forcing Colorado to re-criminalize marijuana, would have invalidated only the laws licensing and regulating the commercial cultivation and sale of marijuana. It would have left the state with a law that legalizes the possession and transfer, for no remuneration, of one ounce of marijuana, and the cultivation of up to six plants. However, there would be no legal market where consumers could obtain their marijuana or marijuana seeds — a version of full decriminalization without the benefits of a regulated market.

From a consumer standpoint, that is far superior to prohibition, but from a public policy perspective, it allows the black market to flourish instead of bringing it above ground where it can be regulated. In fact, that is precisely the system in place in Washington, DC, because Congress has blocked the city’s attempt to establish a legally regulated market.

One doubts the plaintiffs would have liked that outcome, but apparently they were willing to accept it rather than acknowledge the benefits of a regulated market.

Why Attempt Such a Strange Legal Challenge?

The actual, on the ground experience with full legalization in a few states has provided an enormous political advantage to the legalization movement. We are no longer limited to theoretical arguments regarding how legalization might work or whether the change from prohibition to legalization would include some harmful, unintended consequences. Now we have actual data, the vast majority of which is positive and reinforces the advantages of a regulated market.

I presume these anti-marijuana attorneys general from Nebraska and Oklahoma understood that each month that goes by without “the sky falling” in Colorado (and now Washington, Oregon and Alaska) moves the country a little closer to ending prohibition altogether, and they were willing to try this novel legal theory – the legal equivalent of a “hail Mary” pass in football –to stop these legalization experiments as soon as possible.

This was an example of two state attorneys general using the legal system for political street theater. They likely expected it would fail, but thought it would improve their credentials as anti-marijuana zealots.

It was also an admission that our opponents are losing the crucial fight for the hearts and minds of the American public. They sought to have the federal courts intervene, rather than take their case to the American public, who have become increasingly skeptical of the war on marijuana smokers.

A majority of the high court saw through this ruse and refused to play. Initially, we feared that when Justice Scalia was still on the court there might be four members of the court who would vote to hear the case. As it turned out, even with Scalia’s presumed support for the petition, the court would have refused to hear the case by a 6 to 3 decision.

Fortunately, their strategy failed, and these two state attorneys general are left with egg on their faces and no choice but to either drop their challenge, which is unlikely, or begin the slow process of testing their novel legal theory, first at the trial court level, and then years trying to get back to the high court. By the time their challenge might reach the Supreme Court, if it ever does (the court receives approximately 8,000 petitions for certiorari each year, and accepts only around 80 of those to hear, or 1%), we should have many more states in the legalization column and even stronger public support for totally ending marijuana prohibition. Their legal theory would still be a loser.

The Courts Will Not Likely Resolve This Issue

Those of us who favor legalization have had to accept the fact that, with one exception (the Alaska Supreme Court, back in 1978, declared their state anti-marijuana law unconstitutional based on the right to privacy provision in their state constitution), the courts, both state and federal, have rejected attempts to overthrow prohibition on Constitutional grounds, forcing advocates to resort to the use of voter initiatives and state legislation, to move legalization forward.

Because marijuana smoking is not considered a “fundamental right,” all the state has to demonstrate to uphold its anti-marijuana laws is a “rational basis” for the law – that it is rationally related to a legitimate governmental interest.

With this latest rejection by the Supreme Court, our political opponents will have to wage their fight to continue marijuana prohibition via defeating proposed state legislation or voter initiatives. The courts are not going to resolve this issue.

Ultimately, a majority of the American public will determine marijuana policy at both the state and federal level. With majority support for legalization nationwide, that bodes well for our side.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Marijuana Lawsuit Against Colorado Rejected by SCOTUS

Marijuana Lawsuit Against Colorado Rejected by SCOTUS

In 2012, Colorado voted to legalize marijuana production, sales, and consumption for adults, but two neighboring states claimed the law is causing marijuana to spill into their states, creating a law enforcement burden, and that the law is a violation of the Controlled Substances Act.

WASHINGTON, DC — Today, the U.S. Supreme Court denied a request to hear a lawsuit Nebraska and Oklahoma brought against Colorado’s marijuana legalization law, a rare case falling under the Court’s original jurisdiction to hear lawsuits between states.

In 2012, Colorado voted to legalize marijuana production, sales, and consumption for adults, but Attorneys General in the two neighboring states claimed the law is causing marijuana to spill into their states, creating a law enforcement burden, and that the law is a violation of the Controlled Substances Act.

Colorado argued that their law is designed to minimize the illicit market and associated dangers. They also argued that the case is more appropriate for a lower court and that overturning their marijuana law won’t solve the problem outlined by the plaintiffs. SCOTUS didn’t explain the reason for refusing to hear the suit but recommended submitting the case to a federal trial court instead.

“If Nebraska and Oklahoma had the good sense to legalize and regulate marijuana too, we wouldn’t even be having this conversation. What a monumental waste of time to ask our highest court to solve a problem that could be fixed with a well-written piece of legislation or a ballot initiative,” said Neill Franklin, executive director for Law Enforcement Against Prohibition.

SCOTUS typically decides on appeals from lower courts, but they occasionally take on disputes between states in “original jurisdiction” suits. These types of suits occur infrequently and generally deal with disagreements over the use of resources, such as rivers, that flow through more than one state.

In December 2015, the U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli urged the Supreme Court to reject hearing the case, which he said would, “…represent a substantial and unwarranted expansion of this court’s original jurisdiction.”

Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and the District of Columbia have all legalized marijuana for adult use. 23 states and D.C. have legalized some form of access to medical marijuana. In August 2013, the Department of Justice released a memorandum indicating they would no longer interfere in states that choose to regulate marijuana as long as common sense measures are taken to prevent organized crime within the legal businesses and prevent youth access to marijuana, among other reasonable goals.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

US Supreme Court Tosses States’ Lawsuit Against Colorado Over Marijuana Legalization

US Supreme Court Tosses States’ Lawsuit Against Colorado Over Marijuana Legalization

The United States Supreme Court has refused to take up a lawsuit filed by Nebraska and Oklahoma over Colorado’s legalization of marijuana.

WASHINGTON, DC — On Monday, the United States Supreme Court declined to take up a lawsuit filed against Colorado by neighboring states over the legalization of marijuana.

The lawsuit was filed in 2014 by the states of Nebraska and Oklahoma, who asked the Court to find that Colorado’s laws legalizing the state-licensed production and sale of marijuana to adults violates the United States Constitution.

The states had asked the Supreme Court to hear the cases because Colorado’s law is in direct conflict with federal law, under which marijuana remains illegal.  Colorado argued that the states should sue the federal government, not Colorado.

The states claimed that Colorado’s legalization of marijuana “increased the flow of marijuana over their borders,” forcing them to expend greater “law enforcement, judicial system, and penal system resources” as marijuana purchased legally in Colorado crossed into their states.

“The State of Colorado has created a dangerous gap in the federal drug control system … Marijuana flows from this gap into neighboring states, undermining Plaintiff States’ own marijuana bans, draining their treasuries, and placing stress on their criminal justice systems,” the lawsuit alleged.

“The state of Colorado authorizes, oversees, protects and profits from a sprawling, $100 million-per-month marijuana growing, processing and retailing organization that exported thousands of pounds of marijuana to some 36 states in 2014,” the complaining states argued in their latest brief to the court. “If this entity were based south of our border, the federal government would prosecute it as a drug cartel.”

Nebraska and Oklahoma claimed that because of having to divert resources to marijuana law enforcement, the welfare of their residents was jeopardized.  According to the lawsuit, the states suffered “a direct and significant detrimental impact — namely the diversion of limited manpower and resources to arrest and process suspected and convicted felons involved in the increased illegal marijuana trafficking or transportation.”

The state of Colorado argued that a state does not violate the sovereign rights of another state by making a policy decision that parts ways with its neighbors.  Instead, Nebraska and Oklahoma are violating Colorado’s right to set their own policies.

“Colorado does not intend, nor has it attempted, to reach across the border to invade the plaintiff states’ sovereign rights,” Colorado argued in a brief seeking to have the case dismissed. “Indeed, it is Colorado’s sovereignty that is at stake here: Nebraska and Oklahoma filed this case in an attempt to reach across their borders and selectively invalidate state laws with which they disagree.”

In the end, the United States Supreme Court refused to hear the case, issuing an unsigned opinion on Monday.  Two justices — Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito — dissented.

Because Nebraska and Oklahoma filed the case directly with the US Supreme Court, there were no prior lower court rulings on the matter.  The two states could still take the case to a federal district court.

Advocates for marijuana legalization contend that this is not a case that should be determined by the nation’s highest court.  Instead, they say, Colorado’s neighbors should re-evaluate their own states’ marijuana policies.

“At the end of the day, if officials in Nebraska and Oklahoma are upset about how much time and resources their police are spending on marijuana cases, as they said in their briefs, they should join Colorado in replacing prohibition with legalization,” Tom Angell, the chairman of the Marijuana Majority, said in a statement. “That will allow their criminal justice systems to focus on real crime, and it will generate revenue that can be used to pay for healthcare, education and public safety programs.”

“If Nebraska and Oklahoma had the good sense to legalize and regulate marijuana too, we wouldn’t even be having this conversation. What a monumental waste of time to ask our highest court to solve a problem that could be fixed with a well-written piece of legislation or a ballot initiative,” said Neill Franklin, a 34-year law enforcement veteran of the Maryland State Police and Baltimore Police Department who now serves as the executive director for Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, a criminal justice group working to end the War on Drugs.

“This was a meritless lawsuit, and the court made the right decision,” said the Marijuana Policy Project’s Mason Tvert, who co-directed the Colorado’s 2012 marijuana legalization initiative campaign.  “States have every right to regulate the cultivation and sale of marijuana, just as Nebraska and Oklahoma have the right to maintain their failed prohibition policies. Colorado has done more to control marijuana than just about any other state in the nation. It will continue to set an example for other states that are considering similar laws in legislatures and at the ballot box.”

Advocates were not the only ones calling for the Supreme Court to dismiss the case.  In December, on behalf of the Obama Administration, US Solicitor General Donald Verrilli urged the Supreme Court to reject hearing the case, which he said would, “…represent a substantial and unwarranted expansion of this court’s original jurisdiction.”

Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and the District of Columbia have all legalized marijuana marijuana for adult use.  Retail sales of marijuana are underway in all three states, but are not authorized in the District of Columbia.

© 2016 The Daily Chronic. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without expressed, written permission.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Denver NORML Files Marijuana Social Use Initiative for 2016 City Ballot

Denver NORML Files Marijuana Social Use Initiative for 2016 City Ballot

Proposal Would Legalize Private Marijuana Social Clubs and Special Events Where Marijuana Could be Consumed

DENVER, CO — The Denver Chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (Denver NORML) submitted an initiative Monday that would legalize marijuana clubs and special events in the city in 2016.

“Denver residents and visitors alike need places other than private homes to legally and responsibly enjoy legal marijuana with other adults,” said Jordan Person, executive director of Denver NORML.

“This submission to city council is the first step. We’ll get feedback from the city, finalize the language, then start gathering signatures to put it on the ballot,” Person said.

If Denver voters approve the measure this November, private 21+ marijuana social clubs will become legal, as will private 21+ events where marijuana can be lawfully consumed.

“The city will be able to license and regulate private marijuana clubs and special events to ensure public health and safety,” Person said. “But we want to be sure that the regulations are reasonable and consumer-friendly.”

Clubs would be stand-alone venues which could not sell or distribute marijuana, and bars, nightclubs and restaurants could not become private marijuana clubs, Jordan said.

“We expect there will be a wide range of clubs to serve Denver’s huge and diverse marijuana market,” Jordan said. “What can’t continue is the current situation that leaves so many people frustrated, angry, and tempted to violate the law so they can enjoy a legal product.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Colorado: Legal Marijuana Sales Total Nearly $1 Billion in 2015

Colorado: Legal Marijuana Sales Total Nearly $1 Billion in 2015

DENVER, CO — Colorado’s licensed sales of marijuana totaled nearly one billion dollars in 2015, according to economic data provided by the state Department of Revenue.

Licensed retail stores sold $996,184,788 worth of cannabis in the past year, resulting in $135 million in new tax revenue.

As mandated by state law, $35 million in tax revenue was earmarked for public school construction projects.

Total sales in 2015 far exceeded those of 2014, during which time retailers sold just under $700 million in cannabis-related products.

Legal cannabis sales nationwide are anticipated to surpass $21 billion annually by 2020, according to a recently released report by ArcView Market Research.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Colorado’s Marijuana Revenue Exceeded Projections in 2015

Colorado’s Marijuana Revenue Exceeded Projections in 2015

Colorado’s Regulated Marijuana System Generated More Than $135 Million in Revenue for the State in 2015, Including More Than $35 Million for School Construction Projects

DENVER, CO — Colorado’s regulated marijuana system generated more than $135 million in revenue for the state in 2015, including more than $35 million for school construction projects, according to the Colorado Department of Revenue.

There were just under $588 million in adult-use marijuana sales in Colorado from January-December 2015, producing approximately $109.1 million in tax revenue in addition to $4.7 million in license and application fees. The state’s regulated medical marijuana system produced more than $11.4 million in tax revenue and $9.8 million in license and application fees.

In 2014, the state’s regulated marijuana system raised just over $76.1 million in total revenue, including about $56.2 million from adult-use marijuana tax revenue and fees and $19.9 million in medical marijuana tax revenue and fees.

“There are hundreds of millions of dollars in marijuana sales taking place in every state,” said Mason Tvert, the Denver-based director of communications for the Marijuana Policy Project. “Colorado is one of the few where those sales are being conducted by licensed, taxpaying businesses.”

Adult-use marijuana sales in Colorado are subject to the state’s standard 2.9% sales tax, plus a 10% special state sales tax. Additionally, wholesale transfers of adult-use marijuana are subject to a 15% state excise tax. The first $40 million raised annually by the 15% excise tax is earmarked for public school construction projects. The excise tax raised just over $35 million in 2015, up from about $13.3 million in 2014.

“These tax revenue figures are truly impressive,” Tvert said. “Just six years ago, Colorado received zero dollars in tax revenue from the sale of marijuana in the state. Now it’s raising more than $100 million annually with tens of millions of dollars directed toward public school improvements.

“The additional tax revenue far exceeds the cost of regulating the system,” Tvert said. “Regulating and taxing marijuana has been incredibly successful in Colorado, and it represents a model for other states to follow. These numbers should put to rest the claims we keep hearing from opponents that marijuana tax revenue has fallen short of expectations in Colorado.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Navy Veteran Has Children Taken Away Due to Medical Marijuana Use

Navy Veteran Has Children Taken Away Due to Medical Marijuana Use

“People who don’t understand the medical value of cannabis are tearing my family apart,” says Raymond Schwab

Veteran’s Children Held Hostage By the State

Schwab is a US Navy veteran from Kansas who just had 5 of his 6 children taken away from CPS (Child Protective Services) because of his medical marijuana recommendation in Colorado; where cannabis is legal.

Less than a year ago, Raymond Schwab and his wife were in the middle of moving to Colorado to grow medical marijuana for fellow veterans. While they were in Colorado preparing for the big move, the state of Kansas took 5 of their children into custody due to a suspicion of child endangerment (the sixth child was 19 years old).

“There’s still as stigma against parents who use medical marijuana,” said family law attorney Jennifer Ani to reporters. Jennifer sees about 5 cases per month similar to the Schwab’s, in 95% of cases she says the child isn’t in any reasonable danger. “As much as marijuana is a moving target throughout the nation, with Child Protective Services it’s even more so.”

Schwab is a US Navy veteran who served in the Gulf war. He uses a homemade cannabis butter to help treat his PTSD as well as chronic pain. Once Schwab got back to the States after serving his country, he suffered from mental health issues which drove him to become an alcoholic. He was prescribed a myriad of sedatives, pain medications and antidepressants to help him, often times they just made him feel worse. “I got addicted to the pain medication, which led to heroin addiction.” said Schwab.

Medical Marijuana, A Safer Option

Unfortunately this isn’t an un-common story. Over half of current heroin users got their start on prescription painkillers. These opioid painkillers are widely prescribed for chronic pain, because they are akin to heroin they have a seriously high risk of abuse. They are also responsible for thousands of deaths each year in the United States.

Raymond Schwab had a brief stint in rehab to help him overcome his heroin addiction, prescription abuse and alcoholism. He has been sober since 2011 thanks to cannabis helping him with his chronic pain, anxiety, depression and PTSD symptoms.

In 2015 Schwab arranged for a transfer through the Department of Veterans Affairs to get transferred from Kansas to Colorado. His plan was to legally grow his own cannabis and to work with veterans like himself who use medical marijuana to treat pain, PTSD and other conditions.

Betrayed By Family and Country

As Schwab and his wife were on their way to Colorado to get everything set up for them and their 6 children, they received a call. They were told their children were in state custody and they needed to appear for an emergency hearing. The children were in the care of a relative while Schwab went to Colorado. That relative took the children to the police station and told them their parents abandoned them to work on a ‘pot farm’ in Colorado. This all happened in April of 2015.

Since then, Schwab has only seen his children 3 times.

Dr. Sue Sisley is a psychiatrist who recently got a $2 million grant to study the effects of cannabis on PTSD. Dr. Sisley says “A lot of these vets, they can’t function without their meds. And they have to live in fear of a positive drug test, and losing their kids to Child Protective Services. So they live this crazy, covert lifestyle where they’re afraid to be open to the people around them, for fear of that they’ll call CPS.”

Schwab told reporters that as soon as he regains custody of his children he plants to sue the state of Kansas for violating his constitutional rights. “They’re holding my kids hostage and threatening to terminate my rights if I don’t seek cannabis-abuse therapy in a state that’s legal. They’re threatening other people with jail time or losing their kids if they speak out, but I will not submit. I’ll take this to the supreme court if I have to.” said Schwab.

Deliberately Ignoring the Facts, Spreading Fear and Misinformation

In the Parental Drug Use As Child Abuse guide it says “exposing children to the manufacture, possession, or distribution of illegal drugs is considered child endangerment in 11 states.”

It doesn’t seem to matter if a patient has a prescription to use medical marijuana, these 11 states reserve the right to take their children away if the parent uses cannabis. The fear is that the children will be exposed to cannabis and get a ‘contact high’ or even put the raw cannabis in their mouth. Well… this ‘contact high’ has been proven to be a myth, and in order for anyone to feel anything after putting cannabis in their mouth, it would have to be cooked / prepared. There simply isn’t any danger of a child touching / eating a raw cannabis plant, except for sticky fingers and a bad taste in their mouth.

It’s extremely sad and infuriating when stories like this pop up in the news, and we are only exposed to a very small sample size. It is that much more infuriating when someone who served our country is the target. Schwab gave years of his life, risking it in the Gulf war to help protect our freedom and rights. He, along with countless other army vets have been exposed to horrifying scenes that the average person couldn’t even fathom. And we thank him for his service by treating his PTSD with dangerous prescription drugs that drove him to use heroin. When Schwab decided to seek a treatment alternative that would allow him to live his life again, without the plethora of dangerous side effects, we took his children away and held them hostage.

Let’s Start Treating Criminals Like Criminals Regardless of Wealth

This is a brilliant example of how broken our system is. Massive multi-billion dollar industries (tobacco, alcohol and pharmaceuticals) have a vested interest in keeping marijuana illegal. Legalizing marijuana would severely damage their bottom line, and after all, they are in the business of making money, not making lives better.

Allowing these industry titans the ability to buy political favor and sway politicians to vote against legalization is not only irresponsible, it is criminal. How many more lives need to be ruined? How many more families need to be torn apart? How long before we recognize this massive injustice and say enough is enough!?


sources: thedenverpost, theguardian.comthechillbud.com & rt.com

© 2016 The Daily Chronic. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without expressed, written permission.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

ASA Releases New Report on State Medical Marijuana Programs

ASA Releases New Report on State Medical Marijuana Programs

With the release last year of the first detailed analysis and comparison of state medical marijuana laws, Americans for Safe Access (ASA) created a patient-focused tool to identify effective programs and problem areas. That groundbreaking report was followed by the release of ASA’s new, far more detailed report on state programs, which reflects the many new states that have added programs as well as others that have improved their existing programs.

Like the original report, this latest white paper enables advocates, policy makers and concerned citizens to compare and contrast from the patient’s’ point of view the 40 different approaches currently in place in the U.S. Unlike last year’s, this report takes a much closer look at the regulatory frameworks for ensuring product quality and safety. By examining in detail the differences in how state medical cannabis programs have been designed and implemented, ASA’s latest report shines a light on the what’s working and what’s not in ways that can assist policy makers in making the programs under their oversight as broadly effective as possible in ensuring a consistent supply of quality-controlled medicine for the qualifying patients who need it.

A number of states — including Illinois, Maryland, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and Washington — have adopted regulations that reflect the best practice standards set forth by the American Herbal Products Association (AHPA). In addition to the AHPA Recommendations for Regulators, states are also incorporating the laboratory testing standards set forth in the American Herbal Pharmacopoeia Cannabis Inflorescence Monograph. These authoritative, expert standards mean states no longer a need to omit these protocols or “reinvent the wheel” for medical cannabis product safety regulations.

Those expanded regulations to assure product quality and safety are the focus of the new rubric employed in this latest report on state programs. While states got credit in our original report for implementing regulations based on the AHPA and AHP, for 2016 we have taken a far more fine-grained approach to evaluating the extent to which each state program has adopted the recognized industry standards for everything from cultivation, manufacturing and distribution to laboratory testing for product identity and purity. Also included are measures of the ease of access for qualifying patients – arguably the most important criteria for programs – as well as the degree of civil protections from discrimination state law provides patients.  These laws all make a difference in patient’s’ lives, and in some cases may mean the difference between life and death.ASA average grade for state medical cannabis programs

Given the weight of product safety in the updated report’s scoring system, there are some grades that may stand out and raise certain questions. For example, states like Maryland, New York, and New Hampshire all received similar letter grade scores as long time states providing safe access, such as Arizona and Rhode Island. In most instances, this is due the lack of product safety regulations, or having outdated product safety regs that are no longer consistent with best practices. For states like Arizona and Rhode Island, the adoption of up-to-date product safety regulations will bring the overall grades in line with best performing states.

Much has changed in the nearly two decades since California passed the first medical marijuana law. Today, more than 275 million Americans, or about 85% of U.S. population, live where some form of medical cannabis use is legal locally. We estimate that these programs serve approximately two million patients under physician’s’ supervision. Within those various programs, physicians now recommend cannabis-based treatments for over 50 qualifying medical conditions and symptoms. That expansion has not created the problems opponents feared. States with medical cannabis programs have not experienced increased rates of teen use of cannabis. In fact, those states have seen unexpected benefits, including significant drops in opioid overdoses as well as in highway fatalities.

The takeaway from the report is that states are capable of implementing high quality  medical cannabis programs, but not nearly enough are do so in a way the serves patients well in all of the ways that these programs impact patients. This report highlights the given strengths and weaknesses that a state program has, and makes it clear where lawmakers and regulators can make improvements. Patients and caregiver activists can utilize this tool by showing their state officials what key features and protections their programs lack. Every medical cannabis law in the country has room for improvement, and this report can serve as the guide make those improvements become reality. Of course, states would be more free to create medical cannabis laws and regulations the best serve the greatest number of patients if the federal government would permanently end their interference with state programs. Passage of the CARERS Act would do just that, and would signal to lawmakers and regulators that their medical cannabis guidepost should be focused on improving patient outcomes rather than avoiding federal raids.

View and Download a Copy of the Report.

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Letter-grades for all 23 state laws and Washington, D.C.: Alaska (D-), Arizona (B-), California (B+), Colorado (B), Connecticut (C+), Delaware (C), Hawaii (B), Illinois (B+), Maine (B-), Maryland (B), Massachusetts (B), Michigan (D+), Minnesota (C), Montana (D-), Nevada (B), New Hampshire (C), New Jersey (C), New Mexico (B+), New York (C), Oregon (B), Rhode Island (C-), Vermont (D+), Washington (B), and the District of Columbia (C).


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