Tag: Decriminalization

Houston is Getting a New Cannabis Decriminalization Policy

A new marijuana policy from Harris County could set the tone for Texas to pass more widespread decriminalization at a state level.

Newly elected District Attorney Kim Ogg ran on a campaign platform of reducing penalties for low-level, nonviolent drug offenses, and she is sticking to her word. She announced the new policy during a press conference Thursday with Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, Policer Chief Art Acevedo, and Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez.

“Every time they arrest someone in possession of marijuana, police are off the streets for an average of four hours.”

Kim Ogg, Harris County district attorney

The Misdemeanor Marijuana Diversion Program takes effect on March 1, 2017, and will mean that anyone caught with up to four ounces of cannabis will no longer face criminal or civil charges. Instead, offenders will be diverted from the court system if they agree to take a four-hour drug education class. Repeat offenders could continue to take the class, regardless of any past criminal history.

If the suspect does not agree to take the class, officials will file charges and issue an arrest warrant, which means an offender could face up to a $4,000 fine and up to one year in jail if convicted of the Class A misdemeanor.

Ogg has faced criticism for the new policy, most notably from Montgomery County District Attorney Brett Ligon who accused the new DA of trying to legalize cannabis.

“Despite a rise in violent crime rates in Harris County, Ms. Ogg chooses to focus her attention on the issue of legalization of marijuana,” Ligon stated in a press release.

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It’s true that there has been a rise in violent crime in Houston over the past year, and, in fact, the violent crime rate over the last five years has consistently been more than twice the national average. Ogg acknowledged these statistics during her campaign as playing a large part in the reason for her newly revamped marijuana policy.

“Gangs and organized crime are running rampant in Harris County, and I want law enforcement to have the time and money necessary to dismantle those operations,” Ogg said in a statement on her campaign site. “Every time they arrest someone in possession of marijuana, police are off the streets for an average of four hours.”

Cannabis prosecution in Texas is costly, time-consuming, and offers almost no return on investment.

Harris County by the numbers

  • The county spent $13,187,000 incarcerating cannabis offenders
    • Offenders spent an average of six days in jail
  • $4,780,000 was spent by the district attorney’s office to prosecute these offenses
    • There were approximately 10,000 cannabis-related cases
  • $2,970,000 in total court costs
  • $2,552,00 was spent on defendant’s lawyer fees
  • $1,790,000 was spent by state crime labs testing cannabis
  • $1,384,000 was spent on law enforcement costs

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Two-Thirds of Police Say Cannabis Laws Should Be Relaxed, Survey Says

It’s not the first time a marijuana diversion program has been enacted in Harris County.

Former Harris County District Attorney Devon Anderson announced the First Chance Intervention Program on October 1, 2014, but it had a rocky start. It was not until January 1, 2016 that it became mandatory for law enforcement to offer suspects the option of community service rather than jail time.

The two programs differ notably, but carry the same end-goal: lower cannabis arrests and law enforcement costs.

The First Chance program required that offenders have no criminal history, no outstanding warrants, or be out on bond or on probation, and they must complete eight hours of community service or attend an eight-hour class. Offenders must also stay out of trouble for the next 60 to 90 days and pay a $100 fee.

The Misdemeanor Marijuana Program, on the other hand, allows repeat offenders the option of taking a four-hour class, but also requires that offenders not be out on bond or on probation. Offenders must pay a $150 fee for the class, but this fee may be waived if they are unable to afford it.

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Houston Officials Set New Cannabis Tone in Texas

The First Chance program was fairly successful, sparing 2,270 participants from potential jail time and the rate of reoffenders was low, between six and seven percent.

Under the Misdemeanor Marijuana Diversion Program, the county could save millions of dollars and prevent up to 12,000 people from facing jail time. Ogg estimated that the county has spent an average of $25 million per year for the last decade prosecuting cannabis cases.

“We have spent in excess of $250 million, over a quarter-billion dollars, prosecuting a crime that has produced no tangible evidence of improved public safety,” said Ogg. “We have disqualified, unnecessarily, thousands of people from greater job, housing and educational opportunities by giving them a criminal record for what is, in effect, a minor law violation.”


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New York State Assembly Passes Landmark Bill to Seal Past Marijuana Possession Convictions

ALBANY, NY — The New York State Assembly voted this week in support of a bill that will seal the criminal records of people who have been unjustly and unconstitutionally arrested for simple possession of marijuana in public view.

The vote on Assembly Bill 2142 was 95 in favor and 38 opposed.

Over the last 20 years, more than 800,000 New Yorkers have been arrested for simple possession of marijuana. Those convicted face significant barriers to accessing education, employment, housing opportunities, and other state services.

This bill was sponsored by Assemblymember Crystal Peoples-Stokes of Buffalo and members of the Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Caucus, who have vocally called for equity in our state’s drug policies, citing the impact the discriminatory enforcement of these policies have had on communities of color.

“I introduced the marijuana sealing bill because drug laws have created a permanent underclass of people unable to find jobs after a conviction,” said Assemblymember Crystal Peoples-Stokes. “One of the most damaging issues derived from the war on drugs is that the policies are inherently racist. Communities of color have been devastated by bad drug policies and hyper-criminalization for the last 40 years. It is an approach that has never worked and has caused significantly more harm than good to our communities and to our families.”

“If today’s moment of increased attention to heroin encourages us to center public health in our drug policy, then we need to ensure that we are making amends to communities of color by alleviating the burden bad policies have had on their lives. Sealing low-level marijuana possession convictions is the first step to reintegrating thousands of New Yorkers who are inhibited daily from accessing employment, housing and an education all due to a conviction on their record for simple possession of marijuana,” added Peoples-Stokes.

New York State first decriminalized personal marijuana possession in 1977, recognizing the harmful impact an arrest could have on young people.

Although New York officials, including Governor Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio, have previously recognized these arrests as ineffective, unjust, and racially discriminatory, they still continue across the state because of a loophole in the law.

In 2016 more than 22,000 New Yorkers were arrested for possession of small amounts of marijuana – 80% of whom were black or Latino. Governor Cuomo proposed closing this loophole as part of his State of the State 2017, citing the damaging collateral consequences. As policymakers acknowledge that these arrests are unjust and should not take place in the future, they must simultaneously focus on repairing the harm for people burdened by a criminal record from such an arrest.

The discriminatory practices are statewide. For example, in the city of Buffalo in Erie County, African Americans represent 70% of the marijuana arrests – despite only being 38.6% of the population, and using marijuana at similar rates as other groups.

Once convicted, a permanent record can follow these mostly young people of color for the rest of their lives – a record easily found by banks, schools, employers, landlords, and licensing boards.

This sealing legislation has taken on increased importance amid the Trump Administration’s rhetoric and actions targeting immigrant communities. On the national level, simple marijuana possession is the fourth most common cause of deportation, according to the report “Secure Communities and ICE Deportations: A Failed Program?

Sealing records will provide a measure of protection for immigrants by making it difficult or impossible for immigration authorities to meet their legal burden of proof for a judge to find a lawful permanent resident deportable.

Additionally, sealing will guard against the Trump administration’s Executive Order targeting non-citizens with any criminal arrests and/or convictions for deportation. If the arrest is also sealed and the sealed information is not shared with the FBI, these individuals may be at lower risk of becoming an enforcement target.

“A marijuana conviction can lead to devastating consequences for immigrants, including detention and deportation,” said Alisa Wellek, Executive Director of the Immigrant Defense Project. “This bill will provide some important protections for green card holders and undocumented New Yorkers targeted by Trump’s aggressive deportation agenda.”

Increasingly, jurisdictions and legislators across the country are realizing that marijuana prohibition has been ineffective, unjust, and racially discriminatory, and are working to implement regulatory systems that are fair and effective. In New York, Assembly members recognize that, at a minimum, people should not be saddled with a permanent criminal record simply for possession of small amount of marijuana.

“New York must repair the harms of our racially biased marijuana laws and sealing low-level marijuana convictions is a step in the right direction. Thank you to the New York State Assembly for recognizing that a permanent criminal record is an out-sized burden for low-level marijuana possession and that allowing sealing for these convictions will allow New Yorkers to avoid job loss, eviction, and a host of unnecessary collateral consequences.” Alyssa Aguilera, Co-Executive Director, VOCAL-NY

Advocates now look to the Senate to quickly pass the Senate companion bill (S.3809) sponsored by Senator Jamaal Bailey before the session ends on June 21, and to begin to repair the harm done by marijuana prohibition to communities across the state.

Governor Cuomo also has a unique opportunity to address the harms that these arrests have caused by enacting sealing for marijuana possession arrests as part of his decriminalization proposal in the state budget legislation.

Such a move would show his commitment to communities that have borne the harshest brunt of racial profiling and those currently most vulnerable under Trump’s executive orders.

“In New York State 22,000 people were arrested for marijuana possession in 2016. The misdemeanor charge for public view of marijuana possession gives those people convicted a criminal record that will follow them throughout their lives, potentially limiting their access to education, affecting their ability to obtain employment, leading to a potential inability to provide for  their families,” said Senator Jamaal Bailey.

“Furthermore, and even more problematic, there exist significant racial disparities in the manner that marijuana possession policy is enforced. Blacks and Latinos are arrested at higher rates despite the fact that white people use marijuana at higher rates than people of color. Responsible and fair policy is what we need here and this bill will do just that. I am proud to sponsor this legislation with Assemblymember Peoples-Stokes and commend her for taking initiative on this issue. We must act now, with proactive legislation, for the future of many young men and women of our State are at stake here.”

Senator Jesse Hamilton said, “Any one of the more than 22,000 arrests made in our state last year over misdemeanor marijuana possession could snowball into the nightmare of losing one’s job, losing a license used to make a living – to be a nurse, a home health aide, or a security guard – or for immigrants, losing the ability to remain in our country. All that stands alongside stigma and other consequences. This legislation is an important part of tackling that current, overly punitive approach. Steps like this one move us toward the wiser, more humane approach New Yorkers deserve.”

“We applaud the New York Assembly for their continued leadership on marijuana reform,” said Kassandra Frederique, New York State Director of the Drug Policy Alliance. “Sealing past illegitimate marijuana convictions is not only right, it is most urgent as the country moves toward legalization and immigrant families are put at risk under our new federal administration. Comprehensive drug law reform must include legislative and programmatic measures that account for our wrongheaded policies and invest in building healthier and safer communities, from the Bronx to Buffalo, Muslim and Christian, US-born and green card-holding.”

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New York City Marijuana Possession Arrests Spike in 2016

NEW YORK, NY — Criminal arrests for marijuana possession increased ten percent in 2016 despite former promises from Mayor Bill de Blasio to reduce the city’s total number of cannabis-related prosecutions.

New York City police made over 17,600 arrests last year for which the top charge was marijuana possession in the 5th degree – a class B misdemeanor. Of those charged, 85 percent were either Black or Hispanic. Ninety-six percent were arrested specifically for possessing marijuana in a manner that was open to public view.

Under state law, the possession of up to an ounce of cannabis is a non-arrestable offense, except instances where the police contend that the substance was either being burned or was in public view.

In 2010 and 2011, New York City police made approximately 50,000 annual marijuana arrests, often following result of stop-and-frisk encounters. Annual arrests fell between the years 2012 and 2015 before rising again last year.

Legislation is pending in the New York state Senate and Assembly to eliminate the ‘public view’ loophole – a legislative fix that is endorsed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

New Hampshire Marijuana Bill Decriminalization Advances; Legalization Bill Killed

CONCORD, NH — New Hampshire won’t be joining neighboring states of Maine and Massachusetts in legalizing marijuana, but the Granite State could soon follow the rest of their New England neighbors in treating marijuana possession as a violation, rather than a crime that carries a penalty including the possibility of jail time.

Lawmakers in the New Hampshire House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee voted 14 to 2 on Tuesday to advance a bill to decriminalize marijuana possession, but elected to send a bill that would legalize marijuana for adults to further study, effectively killing the measure for the year.

House Bill 640, sponsored by a bi-partisan coalition of six Republican and six Democrat lawmakers, would would reduce the penalty for marijuana possession of up to one ounce by someone 21 years old or older to a violation, punishable only by a fine. Fines would be set at $100 for a first offense, $200 for a second offens, or $350 for a third or subsequent offense.  The bill was advanced on a 14 to 2 vote, and will now be considered by the full House.

Meanwhile, House Bill 656, which would have legalized the possession of up to one ounce of marijuana or five grams of hashish, and personal cultivation of six cannabis plants, for adults 21 or older was held for further study by a vote of 15 to 1, effectively killing the bill for the year.

New Hampshire has fallen behind the rest of its New England neighbors when it comes to reforming marijuana laws.  Possession of any amount of marijuana in New Hampshire is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to one year in jail and fines of up to $350.

The other five New England states have, at the very least, decriminalized possession of personal amounts of marijuana, eliminating the possibility of jail time and imposing only civil fines.

According to the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), police in New Hampshire make around 2,900 marijuana possession arrests each year.

Despite years of attempts to decriminalize marijuana possession in New Hampshire, the Granite State remains the only New England state where marijuana possession brings the possibility of jail time.  The New Hampshire House approved decriminalization bills in each of the last five years, only to see those bills die in the Senate.

Voters from two of New Hampshire’s neighbors, Maine to the north and Massachusetts to the south, legalized marijuana possession at the polls in November.

Newly elected Governor Chris Sununu has said he would support a marijuana decriminalization bill if it were passed by the state legislature.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Wyoming Marijuana Decriminalization Bill Killed, Penalty Reform Bill Advances

Wyoming State Capitol building, Cheyenne (Wikimedia Commons)

CHEYENNE, WY — Marijuana possession won’t be decriminalized in Wyoming anytime soon, but statewide penalties could be reduced for first and second time offenders under a penalty reform bill that would also elevate some possession charges to a felony.

On Tuesday, the House Judiciary Committee considered multiple proposals that would change how low-level marijuana offenses are handled in the state, killing a bill to decriminalize possession but advancing a proposal to reduce some penalties and establish a tier-based fine structure.

Under current Wyoming law, possession of any amount of marijuana under three ounces is a misdemeanor that carries penalties of up to a year in prison and fines of up to $1,000.  Possession of over three ounces, sale or distribution of marijuana is considered a felony.

The committee chose not to advance House Bill 157, the decriminalization bill filed by Rep. Mark Baker (R-Rock Springs) and ten bi-partisan co-sponsors.  The bill would have reduced the penalty for possession of up to three ounces of marijuana in the state from a misdemeanor to a civil violation punishable only by a $200 fine and no jail time.

The committee did, however, advance a proposal that would reduce marijuana first time penalties in the state and create a tiered system of penalties for successive low-level possession convictions.

Under the proposal, House Bill 197, those caught possessing up to three ounces of marijuana would still face fines and the possibility of jail time, based on the number of times they’ve been convicted.  While the penalties for first and second time offenses would be reduced, the proposal increases the maximum possible penalties for those caught three or more times.

First time offenses would be considered a misdemeanor, punishable by up to 20 days in jail and a fine of up to $200.  A second offense within ten years would increase the penalty to up to six months in jail and fines of up to $750, but it would still be a low-level misdemeanor charge.

A third conviction would result in an elevated misdemeanor, bringing a possible prison sentences of up to two years and fines of up to $5,000.

Fourth or subsequent convictions would raise the charge to a felony, with possible prison terms of up to five years and maximum fines of up to $10,000, which is the same penalty for possessing over three ounces currently.

House Bill 197 was approved by the House Judiciary Committee by a vote of 8-1, and could soon see a vote by the full House.  The lone vote against the measure came from Rep. Baker, the primary sponsor of the failed decriminalization bill.

According to the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), state and local police make approximately 2,100 marijuana possession arrests each year in Wyoming, with the state ranking sixth in the nation in per-capita marijuana possession arrests.

More than 70% of Wyoming residents support decriminalization, according to NORML.

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Tennessee Lawmaker Wants to Nullify Local Marijuana Decriminalization Ordinances

NASHVILLE, TN — A Republican lawmaker has filed a bill in the Tennessee legislature to prevent local communities from relaxing local marijuana laws — and to nullify those ordinances that have already been passed in the state’s two largest cities.

State Rep. William Lamberth (R-Cottontown), a former Assistant District Attorney for Sumner County, filed House Bill 173 this week.

The intent of the bill is to override and nullify ordinances passed in the state’s two largest cities — Memphis and Nashville — that were passed late last year to partially decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana.

The ordinances passed in both cities give local police the option of issuing $50 citations for those who possess up to a half-ounce of marijuana, instead of arresting and prosecuting an offender.  Under state law, possession of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to a year imprisonment and a fine of up to $2,500.

In November, the state’s Office of the Attorney General wrote an opinion stating that the ordinances were unenforceable because they conflict with state drug laws.  The opinion reads:

“[T]he ordinance[s] cannot stand because [they] impede the inherent discretion and responsibility of district attorneys general to prosecute violations of the Drug Control Act.”

House Bill 173, if passed, would ban other cities from enacting similar measures:

“No county, city, town, municipality, or metropolitan form of government has the authority by ordinance, resolution, regulation, or other local law to enact or adopt a sanction for conduct involving a drug or other substance if the sanction for that conduct is established … as a criminal offense other than a Class C misdemeanor.”

The bill would also nullify the ordinances already enacted in Nashville and Memphis:

“Any ordinance, resolution, regulation, or other local law enacted or adopted prior to the effective date of this act regulating drugs and other substances that is inconsistent with this part … is superseded and repealed. Any policy, guideline, or practice of any agency, department, or employee of a county, city, town, municipality, or metropolitan form of government that regulates or permits the enforcement of conduct covered by this subsection in a manner inconsistent with state law is void. “

Nashville is the state capital of Tennessee, and is home to over 654,000 people, making it the largest city in the state.  Memphis comes in close as the state’s second largest city with a population of 653,450.

Tennessee residents can contact their representatives and urge them to reject this measure by clicking here. 

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Wyoming: Joint Resolution 11 Would Legalize Marijuana for Adults

CHEYENNE, WY — Two lawmakers from opposite sides of the aisle have come together to co-sponsor a measure that would legalize marijuana for adults 21 and older.

House Joint Resolution 11 is co-sponsored by state Reps. James Byrd (D-Cheyenne) and Mark Baker (R-Sweetwater), the same two lawmakers who have co-sponsored a separate bill to decriminalize marijuana possession in Wyoming.

The resolution would legalize and regulate the commercial cultivation and retail sale of marijuana to adults over the age of 21.

Adults would be able to legally possess up to three ounces of marijuana and grow up to six cannabis plants in the privacy of their home.

As a joint resolution, if passed by the legislature the measure would be sent to voters in the next general election for final approval.

If passed by lawmakers and voters, it would create a constitutional amendment that would legalize marijuana in the state.  Marijuana would become legal in Wyoming on July 1, 2019.

Wyoming residents can contact their representatives in Cheyenne asking them to support HJR 11 by clicking here.

Wyoming’s 2017 legislative session ends the first week in March.

The full text of the bill can be found here.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

North Dakota Marijuana Decriminalization Measure Introduced

BISMARCK, ND — Lawmakers in the North Dakota House have filed a bill to decriminalize the possession of marijuana and marijuana-related paraphernalia.

If passed, House Bill 1340 would amend the state’s existing law so that activities involving the possession of marijuana, marijuana-related paraphernalia, or the internal possession of marijuana are reduced from criminal misdemeanors to non-criminal infractions — punishable by a fine only, no arrest, no jail, and no criminal record.

Under existing law, marijuana possession of one ounce or less is punishable by up to 30 days in jail and a $1,500 fine, while the possession of greater amounts are classified as a felony offense punishable by up to five years in prison.

Possessing marijuana-related paraphernalia is punishable by up to one year in jail and a $3,000 fine.

North Dakota residents can click here to contact elected officials and urge them to support reducing North Dakota’s marijuana-related criminal penalties.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Israel Could Soon Decriminalize Personal Marijuana Use

TEL AVIV, ISRAEL — Israel could soon decriminalize personal use and possession of marijuana, a leading government official said Thursday.

Speaking at a news conference in Tel Aviv, Internal Security Minister Gilad Erdan said if the government approves his policy suggestion, those caught possessing or smoking small amounts of marijuana would face fines instead of arrested and prosecuted, similar to approaches taken in many US states.

“This would mean moving to administrative fines, and criminal prosecution would only be a last resort,” Erdan said.

Up to 15 grams of cannabis would be decriminalized under Erdan’s proposal, which he says could help police focus on more serious matters.

“Police will be able to redirect resources … away from normative personal users and focus instead on dangerous drugs,” Erdan told a news conference in Tel Aviv.

Fines, which have yet to be determined but are likely to be around 1,000 shekel (approximately $265 USD) for a first offense, would be issued to first and second time offenders. Fines would likely be doubled for a second offense.  Third time offenders could face criminal charges if police deem it necessary, and could also risk losing driving and firearm privileges.  Those caught a fourth time would be indicted on criminal charges.

“On the one hand we are not giving up the option for criminal enforcement,” said Erdan, “but on the other we are moving the focus and weight of our policy to education and treatment.”

Enforcement would likely only apply to those caught smoking marijuana in public. Home use and possession of marijuana would no longer be a punishable offense, although it would remain technically illegal to do so.

If Erdan’s plan is approved by the government, it would take effect within three months, Erdan said.

The proposed policy change would not affect the country’s estimated 10,000 licensed medical marijuana patients.

Erdan hinted that the policy change could be the first step in further reforming marijuana laws in Israel, including the possibility of future legalization.

“If data shows that in spite of criminal enforcement there is no reduction in the number of cannabis users, than we must examine if and how we can remove the criminal component either fully or partially,” he added.

Legalizing the retail production and sale of marijuana in Israel could generate approximately 1.6 billion sheckels ($450 million USD) in tax revenue and law enforcement savings annually, according to an economic assessment published in 2013.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Marijuana Decriminalization to Appear on April Ballot in Kansas City, MO

Marijuana Decriminalization to Appear on April Ballot in Kansas City, MO | NORML

KANSAS CITY, MO — Kansas City voters will decide this April on a municipal ordinance to decriminalize marijuana possession offenses. The local initiative, spearheaded by Kansas City NORML, would amend citywide penalties for the possession of up to 35 grams of cannabis from a criminal misdemeanor to a civil violation, punishable by a $25 fine. Council […]

Marijuana Decriminalization to Appear on April Ballot in Kansas City, MO | The Daily Chronic


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.