Tag: Decriminalization

New Hampshire Just Decriminalized Cannabis Possession

New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu on Tuesday signed a bill to decriminalize cannabis possession, removing criminal penalties for having up to three-quarters of an ounce of cannabis or up to five grams of hash.

With the law’s passage, all of New England has now a decriminalized cannabis, as Marijuana Majority founder Tom Angell noted on Twitter.

But if you’re trying to celebrate with a bit of cannabis, don’t risk it just yet. Decriminalization doesn’t take effect for 60 days.

Supporters argue that the change will ensure young people’s lives aren’t ruined by getting caught with marijuana. Opponents have argued that decriminalization sends the wrong message as the state battles a drug crisis.

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The new law makes possessing the cannabis a violation-level offense with a fine of up to $300 for adults. Minors caught with either would be subject to a delinquency petition. Someone can be charged with a misdemeanor, however, if they are found with marijuana for a fourth time within a three-year period.

It also says police cannot arrest someone for a cannabis violation. Any money collected from fines under the law will go into a fund aimed at alcohol and drug abuse prevention and treatment.

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In May, Vermont Republican Gov. Phil Scott vetoed a bill that would have legalized cannabis possession and cultivation in that state. Maine and Massachusetts voters approved legalization in ballot measures last year.

The Associated Press contributed this report.


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New Hampshire Governor Signs Marijuana Decriminalization Bill

Gov. Chris Sununu

New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu

CONCORD, NH — New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu signed a bill into law Tuesday that will decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana in the Granite State.

The new law will officially take effect in 60 days, making New Hampshire the 22nd state in the nation — and the last of the New England states — to eliminate the possibility of jail time for simple marijuana possession.

“The governor deserves credit for his steadfast support of this commonsense reform,” said Matt Simon, the Manchester-based New England political director for the Marijuana Policy Project. “Unlike his predecessors, who opposed similar proposals, Gov. Sununu appears to understand that ‘Live Free or Die’ is more than just a motto on a license plate.

“A lot of credit also goes to the House, which has been passing decriminalization bills since 2008,” Simon said. “It is refreshing to see the Senate finally come to an agreement with the House on this issue. This is a big step toward a more sensible marijuana policy for New Hampshire.”

HB 640 was introduced by Rep. Renny Cushing and a bipartisan group of co-sponsors in the House of Representatives, where it received overwhelming approval in February (318-36). The Senate amended and approved it on May 11 (17-6), and the House passed the Senate version by a voice vote on June 1.

HB 640 will reduce the penalty for possession of up to three-quarters of an ounce of marijuana from a criminal misdemeanor — currently punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,000 — to a civil violation punishable by a $100 fine for a first or second offense and a $300 fine for a third offense within three years of the first offense. A fourth offense within three years of the first offense could be charged as a class B misdemeanor, but there would be no arrest or possibility of jail time.

“There is no good reason to continue arresting and prosecuting people for marijuana possession,” Simon said. “Marijuana is objectively less harmful than alcohol, and Granite Staters are ready to see it treated that way. A very strong majority of state residents support ending marijuana prohibition altogether.

“New Hampshire lawmakers should continue to follow their constituents’ lead on this issue,” Simon said. “Every state in New England is either implementing or strongly considering legislation to regulate marijuana for adult use. It is time for the Legislature to develop a realistic marijuana prohibition exit strategy for New Hampshire.”

More than two-thirds of New Hampshire adults (68%) support making marijuana legal, according to a Granite State Poll released last month by the University of New Hampshire Survey Center.

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New York City: Minorities Still Arrested Disproportionately for Marijuana Violations

NEW YORK, NY — Eighty-seven percent of low level marijuana arrestees in New York City are either African Americans or Latinos, according to an analysis compiled by the Marijuana Arrest Research Project and published this week by the Drug Policy Alliance.

Researchers reported that New York City police officers made more than 60,000 arrests for minor marijuana violations during the first three years of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration (2014-2016) – even though he had previously called the practice “unjust and wrong.”

Of those arrested during this period, 49 percent were black, 38 percent were Latino, nine percent were white, and four percent were classified as either Asian or ‘other.’

Similar racial disparities among low level marijuana arrests existed under the Giuliani and Bloomberg administrations.

Authors concluded, “In 2016, and for the last 30 years, the NYPD has had two very different patterns or systems of enforcement by race and ethnicity for the criminal offense of possessing small amounts of marijuana – separate, unequal, and unjust.”

Recent reviews of marijuana possession arrest data from New JerseyMaryland, and Virginia have identified similar trends. A 2013 American Civil Liberties Union study found that nationwide blacks are approximately four times as likely as whites to be arrested for marijuana possession, even though both ethnicities consume the substance at approximately similar rates.

Although New York state law classifies minor marijuana possession offenses as a non-criminal offense, separate penal law (NY State Penal Law 221.10) defines marijuana possession in a manner that is ‘open to public view’ as an arrestable offense.

Full text of the report, “Unjust and Unconstitutional: 60,000 Jim Crow Marijuana Arrests in Mayor de Blasio’s New York,” is available online.

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Drug Policy Alliance: Time to Decriminalize, NYC Racial Disparities Remain

The Drug Policy Alliance, a leading advocacy group, released a report Tuesday calling for an end to criminal penalties for drug use and possession. Once considered a radical approach, the position in the DPA report has already won the endorsement of more than 30 organizations and key stakeholders. Groups such as the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), Latino Justice PRLDEF, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, and various others have backed the report’s call for decriminalization, a policy that essentially removes the threat of arrest or criminal penalties in cases of simple possession.

The widespread support for decriminalization comes at a crucial time, as Attorney General Jeff Sessions call for ramping up the war on drugs in the face of the nation’s growing opioid epidemic.

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But despite the Trump administration’s shift toward more punative policies, Jag Davies, DPA’s communications director, said most Americans don’t realize how close to decriminalization many state policies already are.

“The US is closer to decriminalizing drugs than most people think, even in a red state like South Carolina,” he said on a conference call with reporters, noting that, in terms of public opinion, polls of presidential primary voters last year found that most support ending arrests for drug consumption and possession.

States included in the study were Maine (with 64% percent in favor of ending arrests), New Hampshire (66%), and South Carolina (59%).

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“Removing criminal penalties for drug use and possession will increase opportunities for people to get help,” said Emily Kaltenbach, the DPA’s senior director of national criminal justice strategy. “Today, people who need drug treatment or medical assistance may avoid it in order to hide their drug use.  If we decriminalize drugs, people can come out of the shadows and get the help they need.”

Extreme Racial Disparities Persist in New York Possession Arrests

The need to remove criminal penalties for cannabis consumption and possession persists in New York City, according to a second DPA report released today. It shows that arrests for marijuana possession under Mayor Bill de Blasio continue to be marked by high racial disparities.

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The report found that during the first three years of the De Blasio administration, the NYPD made more than 60,000 criminal arrests for cannabis possession. Nearly 86% of those arrests were of black or Latino individuals.

“We believe it’s time for a new approach, and that approach shouldn’t involve criminalizing New York’s most vulnerable populations.”

Alyssa Aguilera , co-executive director, Vocal NY

New York residents living in public housing constituted the single largest group of people arrested. Last year, in 2016, the NYPD housing police made 21% of the city’s 18,121 arrests for cannabis possession. Of those, 92% of arrests were of black or Latino residents.

The two groups make up about half the city’s population but account for 66% of the cannabis possession arrests. Of the city’s 76 neighborhood police precincts, black or Latino residents make up a majority in 37.

“Prohibition has played a significant role in devastating low-income communities of color through racially biased enforcement and has often come with steep collateral consequences,” said Alyssa Aguilera, co-executive director of the community activist group Vocal NY. “We believe it’s time for a new approach, and that approach shouldn’t involve criminalizing New York’s most vulnerable populations.”

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The following groups and individuals have endorsed the Drug Policy Alliance’s report, “It’s Time for the U.S. to Decriminalize Drug Use and Possession”:

  • A New PATH (Parents for Addiction Treatment & Healing)
  • American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)
  • American Friends Service Committee Colorado
  • Broken No More
  • Center for Juvenile and Criminal Justice
  • Center for Living and Learning
  • Centro Cáritas de Formación
  • Clergy for a New Drug Policy
  • Community Oriented Correctional Health Services
  • CURB Prison Spending
  • DanceSafe
  • Denver Justice Project
  • Drug Policy Australia
  • Drug Policy Forum of Hawai’i
  • Drug Truth Network
  • Grief Recovery After a Substance Passing (GRASP)
  • Harm Reduction Action Center
  • Harm Reduction Australia
  • Iglesia Evangélica Protestante de El Salvador
  • Intercambios Asociación Civil
  • International Centre for Science in Drug Policy
  • International Drug Policy Coalition
  • Junot Díaz
  • Latino Justice PRLDEF
  • Law Enforcement Action Partnership
  • Moms United to End the War on Drugs
  • National Advocates for Pregnant Women
  • New Mexico Criminal Defense Lawyers Association
  • Progress Now NM
  • Protect Families First
  • Release
  • Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference
  • StopTheDrugWar.org
  • Students for Sensible Drug Policy
  • Transform Drug Policy Foundation
  • Trinity United Church of Christ, Chicago
  • Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA)
  • Women With a Vision


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Tale of Two New Yorks as NYPD Continues Discriminatory Marijuana Arrests

NEW YORK, NY — The Marijuana Arrest Research Project will release a major report Tuesday, commissioned by the Drug Policy Alliance.

The report, Unjust and Unconstitutional: 60,000 Jim Crow Marijuana Arrests in Mayor de Blasio’s New York, shows that despite changing mayoral administrations and police commissioners, the NYPD continues to make large numbers of unjust and racially-targeted marijuana possession arrests.

Despite Mayor Bill de Blasio’s campaign promise to end racially-biased policing, marijuana possession was New York City’s fourth most commonly charged criminal offense in 2016.

Black and Latino New Yorkers continue to comprise 85 percent of the more than 60,000 people arrested for low-level marijuana possession on Mayor de Blasio’s watch. Most people arrested are young Blacks and Latinos – even though studies consistently show young Whites use marijuana at higher rates.

The new report shows that the NYPD targets Blacks and Latinos for marijuana misdemeanor enforcement all over New York City. One key finding is that in many neighborhoods where Blacks and Latinos constitute a small minority of the residents, they are arrested in much higher numbers than Whites.

The NYPD arrests Black New Yorkers at 10 times the rate of Whites in Manhattan and 15 times the rate of Whites in Staten Island.

The report includes extensive analyses of marijuana arrest data from the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services and demographic data for all five boroughs.

The full report will be released at noon Tuesday.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

It’s Time for the US to Decriminalize Drug Use and Possession

An unprecedented and wide-ranging coalition of powerful stakeholders is calling for an end to the widespread practice of arresting people solely for drug use or possession. The release of a new Drug Policy Alliance report, endorsed by over 30 organizations, that lays out a roadmap for how U.S. jurisdictions can move toward ending the criminalization of people who use drugs.

Ending criminal penalties for drug possession, often referred to as decriminalization, means nobody gets arrested, goes to jail or prison, or faces criminal punishment simply for possessing a small amount of a drug for personal use.

The emerging consensus for decriminalization comes at a pivotal moment, with the federal government ramping up the drug war in the face of bipartisan opposition and widespread public support for health-based responses to increasing opioid addiction and overdose deaths.

Polls of presidential primary voters last year found that substantial majorities support ending arrests for drug use and possession in Maine (64%), New Hampshire (66%) and even South Carolina (59%).  In 2016, the first state-level decriminalization bill was introduced in Maryland and a similar version was reintroduced in 2017. The Hawaii legislature, meanwhile, overwhelmingly approved a bill last year creating a commission to study decriminalization.

Just last month, the United Nations and World Health Organization released a joint statement calling for repeal of laws that criminalize drug use and possession. They join an impressive group of national and international organizations who have endorsed drug decriminalization that includes the International Red Cross, Organization of American States, Movement for Black Lives, NAACP, and American Public Health Association, among many others.

“Removing criminal penalties for drug use and possession will increase opportunities for people to get help,” said Emily Kaltenbach, senior director of national criminal justice strategy at the Drug Policy Alliance. “Today, people who need drug treatment or medical assistance may avoid it in order to hide their drug use.  If we decriminalize drugs, people can come out of the shadows and get the help they need.”

The criminalization of drug possession is a major driver of mass incarceration and mass criminalization in the United States. Each year, U.S. law enforcement makes at least 1.2 million arrests simply for drug possession. On any given night, there are at least 133,000 people behind bars in U.S. prisons and jails for drug possession – and 63,000 of them are held pre-trial.

“Our current laws have branded tens of millions of people with a lifelong criminal record that makes it hard to get a job or an apartment,” said Art Way, senior director of national criminal justice strategy at the Drug Policy Alliance. “The experience of the last few decades shows that criminalization has been utterly ineffective in reducing problematic drug use.”

Discriminatory enforcement of drug possession laws has produced profound racial and ethnic disparities at all levels of the criminal justice system. Black people comprise just 13 percent of the U.S. population – but they comprise 29 percent of those arrested for drug law violations, nearly 35 percent of those incarcerated in state or federal prison for a drug law violation, and roughly 35 percent of those incarcerated in state prison for drug possession.

“Decriminalizing drug use would be a huge step toward eliminating racial disparities in law enforcement,” added Way.

Drug criminalization also fuels mass detentions and deportations.  For noncitizens, including legal permanent residents – many of whom have been in the U.S. for decades and have jobs and families – possession of any amount of any drug (except first-time possession of less than 30 grams of marijuana) can trigger automatic detention and deportation, often without the possibility of return. From 2007 to 2012, more than 100,000 people were deported simply for drug possession.

Many jurisdictions in the U.S. have already made successful steps toward decriminalization by reducing criminal penalties for drug possession. Some of these efforts include “de-felonizing” drug possession by reducing it from a felony to a misdemeanor (which the Oregon legislature just approved last week), decriminalizing or legalizing marijuana possession, establishing pre-arrest diversion programs such as Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD), and enacting 911 Good Samaritan laws, which allow for limited decriminalization at the scene of an overdose for people who are witnesses and call for emergency medical assistance. But more ambitious efforts are needed.

Several countries have successful experience with decriminalization, most notably Portugal.  In 2001, Portugal enacted one of the most extensive drug law reforms in the world when it decriminalized low-level possession and use of all illegal drugs.  Today in Portugal, no one is arrested or incarcerated for drug possession, many more people are receiving treatment, and HIV/AIDS and drug overdose have drastically decreased – all without any significant increases in rates of crime or drug use. The Portuguese experience demonstrates that ending drug criminalization – alongside a serious investment in treatment and harm reduction services – can significantly improve public safety and health.

Next week in Chicago, DPA will host an invitation-only two-day convening of several dozen leading criminal justice and public health stakeholders to strategize next steps in building support for drug decriminalization.

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16 Years Later: What Happened After Portugal Decriminalized Drugs in 2001?

By the late 1990s, Portugal had reached a crisis point. Facing unprecedented rates of addiction, prison overcrowding, and a rapidly growing HIV epidemic, the country was in dire need of a solution. Change finally occurred when in 2001, it decriminalized all drugs, embarking on the first step of a great nationwide experiment.

Decriminalization is not legalization; drug offenders may still incur penalties, but the idea is to redirect enforcement resources and prevent flooding prisons with non-violent offenders. Not all decriminalization models look the same, but now that Portugal’s has been in effect for 16 years, we look back to see what effect this particular model has had on its society.

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Drug Decriminalization in History

In Portugal, drugs are still illegal, but any user carrying less than 10 days’ worth of illicit substances will simply have their supply confiscated. They will then undergo an assessment with a social worker, psychologist, and lawyer. Only a small fraction of users will experience further consequences. These can range from a few days’ community service to a ban on visiting venues in which the person is known to obtain or use drugs. Some high-risk cases may receive invitations to undergo treatment. Drug rehab is voluntary in all but the most exceptional circumstances.

Portugal has seen significant positive change in the realm of disease prevention, with nationwide HIV rates decreasing dramatically since decriminalization.

Portugal’s geography made it a hot spot for drug trafficking between Europe and Africa. Heroin grew in popularity in the 1980s, and despite the implementation of government-funded methadone and needle exchange programs, blood-borne illness had become rampant by the 90s. Though the country seemed to have consumed drugs at much lower rates than its neighbors, it still had the highest rate of HIV amongst injecting drug users in the EU, with CIA estimates claiming that by 2001, over 22,000 people were living with HIV/AIDS.

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Cannabis and HIV/AIDS

Still, the decision to decriminalize was not undertaken lightly. The only modern Western country to attempt decriminalization had been Italy, and its program failed to reap many discernible positive consequences. Many fierce opponents, especially those from the more conservative Social Democratic Party, argued that abuse would skyrocket and the country would become a hub for drug tourism. Ultimately, the more progressive Socialist party was able to push the law through, mostly due to its near majority in parliament.

The Effects of Portugal’s Drug Decriminalization Model

Aspects of Portugal’s model have been used to either support or critique decriminalization as an answer to various social problems. While many of these statistics can be difficult to measure and interpret, it would appear that it’s had had both positive and negative impacts. Let’s look at a few.

Disease Prevention

Portugal has seen significant positive change in the realm of disease prevention, with nationwide HIV rates decreasing dramatically since decriminalization. In 2014, only 40 intravenous drug users tested positive for HIV, down from 1,482 in 2000. The good news doesn’t stop there–after a decade and a half of battling Hepatitis C with lackluster results, the Portuguese government committed to 100% coverage of the disease. Since then, 96% of those who finished treatment have been effectively cured.

Drug Use Rates

Many proponents of decriminalization claim that Portugal managed to decrease overall drug use, but it really depends on how we choose to interpret the statistics. Lifetime drug users (defined as people who have tried any drug, even once) actually rose from 8% to 12% between 2001-2007, then declined once more to 9.5% in 2014. ‘Problem’ drug users–those who have come into contact with the police or rehabilitation facilities due to their drug habit–seem to have decreased by more than 10%. However, these statistics could be flawed due to differences in measurements through the years. Past month and year drug use has remained steadily low, with only 5% of 18-24 year olds, for example, having used cannabis in the past month.

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Lack of information makes it difficult to plot usage of ‘harder’ drugs over time. Comparing Portugal to its neighbors, however, puts it in a generally favorable light. For instance, as of 2012, Portugal’s lifetime cocaine use per capita was about one-tenth that of Spain’s and one-fifth that of France’s.

As of 2012, Portugal’s lifetime cocaine use per capita was about one-tenth that of Spain’s and one-fifth that of France’s.

Crime Rates

Though we’ve seen some positive benefits, it should come as no surprise that large, sweeping changes to the legal system have also resulted in some negative repercussions. Arguably, the most glaring issue is the rise in homicides, which climbed by about 60% from 2001-2007. They have evened out since, though, and currently sit at a little more than 10% more than they were pre-decriminalization.

Incarcerations

The criminal landscape has certainly changed, but it doesn’t seem to be growing smaller. Incarcerations have risen slightly from 2001 to 2012 despite the fact that fewer than half as many people are now incarcerated for drug crimes. Those who are pro-decriminalization often point to this statistic as a sign that police are now unburdened from their duties in persecuting small drug offenses, and are now able to tackle more substantial crime. Others argue that lax drug laws have led to more crime, and back up their claim by referencing the growing underground population reported by undercover agents interviewed in the study What Can We Learn From the Portuguese Decriminalization of Illicit Drugs?

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Takeaways From Portugal’s Drug Decriminalization

Many people have cited the Portuguese model as evidence that the US should adopt a similar policy. It isn’t certain, however, that we could apply these techniques in America as it currently stands. The successes achieved in Portugal were not due to decriminalization alone–the country stands on a strong foundation of socialized public health care, which differs enormously from what we see in the US.

America also has significantly greater problems with intentional homicide, gang-related crime, and gun violence. A growth in the already prominent underground criminal scene could have disastrous social consequences.

Finally, it’s important to step back and remember that large-scale social transformation doesn’t happen in a vacuum. Portugal, like the rest of the world, has witnessed unprecedented change since 2001. Factors including the technological revolution, the growth of the EU, and the economic crisis must all be considered. Still, anyone advocating for decriminalization should analyze the results carefully. From this data, we can reap valuable insight into the successes and setbacks which may lie on the road ahead.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Maryland Marijuana Expungement Bill Becomes Law Without Governor’s Signature

Maryland Marijuana Expungement Bill Becomes Law Without Governor’s Signature | NORML

ANNAPOLIS, MD — Legislation permitting certain marijuana offenders to petition for an expungement of their criminal convictions became law on May 27. Republican Gov. Larry Hogan took no action on the bill. Senate Bill 949 permits those previously convicted of a marijuana possession offense to petition to have their criminal record expunged. The law takes effect […]

Maryland Marijuana Expungement Bill Becomes Law Without Governor’s Signature | The Daily Chronic


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New Hampshire Lawmakers (Finally) Pass Bill to Decriminalize Marijuana

CONCORD, NH — Getting busted for small amounts of marijuana in a state who’s motto is “Live Free or Die” will soon no longer result in the possibility of jail time.

New Hampshire will finally become the final state in New England to decriminalize marijuana possession, as the House of Representatives voted Thursday to give final approval to House Bill 640, sending it to the desk of Chris Sununu, who is expected to sign the measure into law.

Once it takes effect, the new law will reduce the penalty for possession of up to three-quarters of an ounce of marijuana or five grams of hash from a criminal misdemeanor — currently punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,000 — to a civil violation punishable by a $100 fine for a first or second offense and a $300 fine for a third offense within three years of the first offense.

A fourth offense within three years of the first offense could be charged as a class B misdemeanor, but there would be no arrest or possibility of jail time.

Despite years of attempts to decriminalize marijuana possession in New Hampshire, currently possession of any amount of marijuana in New Hampshire is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to one year in jail and fines of up to $350.

According to the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), police in New Hampshire make around 2,900 marijuana possession arrests each year.

The New Hampshire House approved decriminalization bills in each of the last five years, only to see those bills die in the Senate.

Voters from two of New Hampshire’s neighbors, Maine to the north and Massachusetts to the south, legalized marijuana possession at the polls in November.

HB 640 was originally introduced in the House by Rep. Renny Cushing and a bipartisan group of co-sponsors.  Text of the bill, as passed by lawmakers, can be found here.

Changes to the law will take effect 60 days after the bill is signed by the Governor.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

New Hampshire Cannabis Decriminalization Bill Heads to Governor

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — New Hampshire moved a step closer to joining the rest of New England in decriminalizing small amounts of marijuana.

The New Hampshire House on Thursday voted to remove criminal penalties for possessing small amounts of cannabis. The bill now goes to Republican Gov. Chris Sununu, who plans to sign it. The bill passed the House without debate.

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The House originally approved changing possession of up to an ounce of marijuana from a misdemeanor to a violation-level office. The Senate changed that to three-quarters of an ounce, and the House agreed to the change.

Supporters argue that the change will ensure young people’s lives aren’t ruined by getting caught with marijuana. Opponents have argued that decriminalization sends the wrong message as the state battles a drug crisis.

The legislation makes possessing the cannabis or five grams of hashish or less a violation-level offense with a fine of up to $300 for adults. Minors caught with either would be subject to a delinquency petition. Someone can be charged with a misdemeanor, if they are found with marijuana for a fourth time within three years.

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It says police cannot arrest someone for a marijuana violation. Any money collected from fines under the law will go into a fund aimed at alcohol and drug abuse prevention and treatment.

The House’s action comes a little after a week since Vermont Republican Gov. Phil Scott vetoed a bill that would have legalized marijuana in that state. Scott said he thinks it still could be possible to pass a bill. He said negotiations have been taking place to address his concerns with the one he vetoed.

Maine and Massachusetts’ voters approved legalization in ballot measures last year.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.