Tag: dispensaries

Bud on a Budget: What $20, $50, and $100 Buy at a Recreational Dispensary in Seattle

The amount of cannabis $20, $50, or $100 will get you varies widely depending on where you are, what you like, and how you shop. It depends on factors like market size, tax rates, whether you’re a recreational consumer or a medical patient, and what consumption methods you’re shopping for. That said, any of these amounts can go a long way at a cannabis dispensary if you do it right.

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A few helpful tips: First, use Leafly dispensary pages’ menu tabs to research product selection ahead of time and make sure you like what you see before making a trip. When you get there, be sure to tell your budtender up front what your budget is: Matt, who helped me on my visit to Dockside, did a great job helping me stick to what I intended to spend and point out new products that fit within that window. Also, remember to account for tax. Washington state maintains a 37% excise tax on all cannabis products across the board, with a majority of that revenue going to public health programs. Most dispensaries will include the tax in product pricing, but if the prices you see listed seem crazy-low, that may be the reason.

I checked out Dockside Cannabis in SoDo to find out what $20, $50, and $100 will get you at a Seattle dispensary. Our price points are cumulative, so the images pictured at each successive level are in addition to all of the products seen before them.

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How Much Cannabis Will $20 Buy?

How Much Weed Can You Buy for $20, $50, and $100? | LeaflyA nice gram, 10mg edible, three packs of matches, and free joint crutches can be had for under $20 at Dockside. (Amy Phung and Julia Sumpter/Leafly)

At $20, my budget was relatively limited, so I spent the bulk of our budget on flower (choosing to go for one higher-quality gram rather than two grams from the bottom shelf), grabbed an inexpensive single-serving edible, and snuck in a couple freebies (and near-freebies) to fill out the cart.

What I got:

Cumulative total: $18.75

Why I bought it:

Grape Ape by Artizen | Artizen’s bright, bold packaging always catches eyes immediately from behind the counter, and since the brand that won our competition for the best Blue Dream in Washington state, I trust them to provide consistent high-quality cannabis. At $12, this isn’t a budget gram, but I’m willing to pay more when I can count on getting great value.

Lori’s Organic Salt and Pepper Potato Chips | There are a lot of sweet edibles out there, so this savory option, relatively new to the market, caught my eye right away. Turns out I discovered a new favorite: These chips are as tasty as any non-infused brand you’d pick up at the grocery store, and I could hardly detect any cannabis flavor at all. Even better, they were on sale the day I visited—I got a discount of $1.20 at checkout, so the actual price ended up being $4.80, a bargain for a single 10mg serving.

Matches and crutch cards | While I also carry a lighter, I still enjoy lighting my joints the old-school way, with matchbooks from my favorite places. And It’s always worth asking whether your dispensary offers any freebies; I wouldn’t have noticed the pile of complimentary crutch cards sitting new the register otherwise.

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How Much Cannabis Will $50 Buy?

How Much Weed Can You Buy for $20, $50, and $100? | LeaflyTwo more edibles, a pre-roll, and dabs bring the total to just under $50. (Amy Phung and Julia Sumpter/Leafly)

At $50, you’ve got a lot more wiggle room. This price point let me add a concentrate, an award-winning soda, a CBD edible, and a pre-roll (complete with an awesome custom-designed strain sticker) to my initial spend.

What I got:

Cumulative total: $49.75

Why I bought it:

Orange Cream Soda by Olala | This infused beverage won Washington’s 2017 Dope Cup award for Best Liquid Edible, so I was all for trying it out. At $6, it’s also cheaper than most other THC sodas at Dockside.

Electric Lemon Concentrate by MJ Botanicals | To stay within my budget, I went with a concentrate on the cheaper end of the spectrum, and targeted a flavor I love in my dabbable extracts: citrus.

Swifts CBD Cannabees Honey by Green Labs | I always like to pick up a CBD-dominant product on my dispensary trips, and CBD honey is extremely versatile—I can add it to drinks, spread it on biscuits or toast, or savor it plain like a honey stick.

Tangie Pre-Roll with Sticker by Leaph | Having toured the Leaph facility and met the people growing this strain, I feel a personal connection to the brand and always keep my eye out for their products. I also like collecting the brightly colored, artist-designed stickers inside their flower and pre-roll packages.

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How Much Cannabis Will $100 Buy?

How Much Weed Can You Buy for $20, $50, and $100? | LeaflyTack on a blunt, bath soak, and chocolate and you’ll land almost squarely at $100 including tax. (Amy Phung and Julia Sumpter/Leafly)

Unless I’m buying in large quantities for something like a baking project or a get-together, I rarely feel the need to spend more than $100 on a dispensary trip—I’d rather shop more frequently, and use those frequent trips to try a wider variety of products and maximize their freshness when I enjoy them.

With an additional $50 at my disposal beyond what I’d already spent, I splurged on products that aren’t necessary but are definitely fun: a cannabis-infused bath soak, a blunt to share with friends, and a colorfully painted mint chocolate square.

What I got:

Cumulative total: $99.75

Why I bought it:

Body Buzz Bath Salt Soak by Ethos | This product gave me an excuse to try something new, and I appreciate that their soak is made with full-flower extract that not only contains 60mg THC, but also includes up to 40mg of cannabinoids such as CBD, CBDA, CBN, and CBG, as well as additional terpenes.

Strawberry Cough Blunt by Seattle Green Bud | Since Washington doesn’t allow sales of cannabis products that incorporate tobacco, producers have gotten creative, wrapping “blunts” in other leaf material, such as cannabis leaves. Like the Leaph pre-roll, this product also comes with a bonus sticker.

Seagoat Mint Chocolate Square | With a goat icon and a splash of color across the front of this Ghirardelli-sized chocolate square, this product caught my eye even though the brand was new to me, and the fact that my budtender endorsed it sealed the deal. The squares are made with single-origin chocolate from Venezuela, and weigh in at 61% cacao.

A final spend: Not included on the receipt was my $5 tip, bringing the official total (including the $1.20 discount applied to the Lori’s chips at checkout) to $103.55. While tipping isn’t required, if your budtender is working with you through choosing a dozen cannabis products (or even a few) to fit your budget, they definitely deserve some appreciation. If you’re absolutely set on getting out the door under $100 total, skip that extra $5 chocolate and put the remainder in the tip jar.

How Much Weed Can You Buy for $20, $50, and $100? | Leafly(Julia Sumpter/Leafly)


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Baltimore Preps for First Batch of Dispensaries

In North Baltimore’s bustling Hampden neighborhood, a medical marijuana dispensary dubbed Chesapeake Integrated Health Institute is setting up shop inside a former cabinet hardware store. A mile east, in Wyman Park, another dispensary, Medical Products and Services, is repurposing a former art and gem gallery.

Baltimore will see 11 dispensaries spread across its six districts. But so far, only three have made their locations public.

Both shops sit on parallel thoroughfares in areas zoned for commercial and residential use. But while their surroundings are similar, the dispensaries have drawn divergent responses from neighbors.

In Wyman Park, residents lined up by the dozens at community meetings over the summer to air security and crime concerns around the latter dispensary, co-owned by Alan Staple. “Medical cannabis is a new industry in Maryland,” Staple wrote in an email. “So naturally people have many questions.”

In Hampden, the response was comparatively calm. Merchants and community members met with Leah Heise, co-owner of Chesapeake Integrated Health Institute, to talk through concerns in person.

While the two shops are “both essentially in Hampden,” Heise told Leafly, “[Staple’s] dispensary crosses over two different community associations, Wyman Park and Hampden.”

She added, “Wyman Park has been a little bit more upset about the fact that a dispensary is coming into their neighborhood.”

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More than four years have passed since Maryland legalized medical cannabis. After numerous delays, the state is preparing to finally begin serving patients through 102 planned dispensaries. Each of Maryland’s 47 legislative districts can have two—more if a permitted grower is also licensed to dispense product.

The city of Baltimore will see 11 dispensaries spread across its six districts, the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission announced last spring. But so far, only three of those have made their locations public. Unlike in Michigan and other states, where operators must nail down locations and local government approvals before receiving a license, applicants for Maryland’s medical marijuana licenses weren’t required to site their stores first.

“Because Maryland didn’t make you choose a location, you didn’t have to approach whatever the community association was until the time you had actually identified a property,” Heise explained.

Residents of Wyman Park were thus surprised to learn a dispensary was on its way. Most other neighborhoods are probably still unaware, as only operators in Hampden, Wyman Park, and South Baltimore’s Federal Hill neighborhood have announced they’re moving in.

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The city’s new zoning law, Transform Baltimore, handles dispensaries the same way it does retail pharmacies such as Rite-Aid and Walgreens, letting them operate in mixed commercial-residential areas. Zoning administrator Geoffrey Veale called it a “common sense approach” at a July meeting organized by the Wyman Park Neighborhood Association.

The characterization raised some eyebrows, especially among those who felt cannabis businesses should be held to a different standard.

“They left it as a retail goods establishment,” said Jack Boyson, the neighborhood association’s president. “The question is, where do we fit in? I think people are concerned about why are we having this in our backyard without any consultation.”

Baltimore’s Hampden district (peeterv/iStock)

Crime was an especially hot topic at the meetings. Gene Meyer, a resident who lives 120 feet from Medical Products and Services’ future site, pointed to a UCLA study that suggested a link between increased crime and dispensaries’ proximity to highway off-ramps.

(The research is far from conclusive. The same study concluded that density of dispensaries “was not associated with violent or property crime rates,” and a separate study by USC and UC-Irvine researchers has shown that neighborhood crime actually increased after the closure of dispensaries.)

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While some neighbors said they’d prefer a dispensary nearby to, say, a bar or music venue, others remain wary. People unfamiliar with how the businesses operate suggested the smell of pungent product would stink up the surrounding area, or that patients would consume in the parking lot outside.

“There was an array of emotion versus reason,” said Michal Makarovich, a local merchant and the vice president of the Wyman Park Neighborhood Association. “I think people, they know this is coming through. They’re OK with it, but they don’t want it in their backyard.”

The association pressed the Baltimore City Council to hold a public hearing on the issue in August. After hearing complaints, city officials said they’d consider an option to modify the zoning law by including a special application process for dispensaries and growers, a policy implemented in nearby Baltimore County.

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But in October, Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke said she and her colleagues determined that the plan ultimately wouldn’t work. The city’s zoning board had already approved the locations of Medical Products and Services and Chesapeake Integrated Health Institute.

“It’s incumbent upon each of the awardees to reach out and form partnerships and be a real part of helping the community.”

Darrell Carrington, Greenwill Consulting Group

“Even if we do change the law to require conditional use status—for example, before the zoning board or the City Council—we can’t do it retroactively,” said Clarke, whose district is home to both dispensaries.

An alternative solution has since emerged: memorandums of understanding between neighbors and dispensary operators. One is currently being finalized between Medical Products and Services and two neighborhood associations to address security, lighting, packaging of products, and even employee training, Makarovich said.

Heise said her shop’s MOU in Hampden will likely be similar, if they enter into one. Usually those issues are addressed early on in a dispensary operator’s business plan anyway, she said.

“Some of those concerns were based on the fact that [residents] don’t understand that the law prohibits people from consuming on-site,” Heise explained. “We’re no different than a pharmacy. It’s just getting the education out there and dispelling the belief that this is going to be akin to some type of opium den.”

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Darrell Carrington, a lobbyist who works with Maryland’s Greenwill Consulting Group, said MOUs with community groups allow dispensaries to forge bonds with locals, such as through financial agreements with nonprofits.

“I think it’s incumbent upon each of the awardees to reach out and form partnerships and be a real part of helping the community move forward with economic development,” he said.

While Baltimore’s zoning rules for dispensaries may have spurred tensions, other cities have faced more significant zoning troubles. Detroit lawmakers made the process so restrictive that it appears nearly impossible to find a permitted location for a dispensary. In Seattle, “Little Amsterdams” – highly concentrated areas of dispensaries – sprouted up due to buffer zones for sensitive places like child-care centers and public parks. (Seattle lawmakers enacted a fix in early 2016, reducing the buffer zones while also setting a required minimum distance between dispensaries.)

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In California, meanwhile, state regulators are requiring “local approval” in order to issue a cannabis business license— in part to encourage dispensaries to come to the table with neighborhood representatives.

While Clarke has admitted Baltimore’s lack of dispensary zoning rules was actually an oversight by the council, Carrington says the retail pharmacy designation for the businesses was actually “very forward-thinking.”

“Any place that you’ll would have a Walgreens or a CVS, you should be able to locate a medical cannabis dispensary as well,” he said.

As an owner, Heise said she would have appreciated the additional guidance of a more specific zoning law. Then again, she said, finding an appropriate location “is probably the number one most difficult task a dispensary owner faces,” particularly for those who rent their space. (Heise said she arranged to lease her location on Falls Road from a cannabis-friendly landlord. Her dispensary will be up and running in the “first quarter of 2018,” she wrote in an email. )

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Makarovich, of the Wyman Park Neighborhood Association, encouraged communities with similar concerns to follow Hampden’s and Wyman Park’s lead. Set up in-person meetings, he said, and try to set terms with dispensary operators early on.

“There’s the zoning for it; there’s the law for it, from the city, from the state. It’s going to happen,” he said. “You can keep fighting and fighting, and getting on each other’s wrong sides, or you can try to work out the best deal you can have.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Is Ontario’s Legal Cannabis Monopoly Constitutional?

The Supreme Court of Canada is about to consider the impact of the country’s legalization plan on the country’s interprovincial trade. Canada’s top court has accepted an application from cannabis-related companies to intervene in an upcoming case that some are saying could have wide implications for interprovincial trade in the country.

In 2016, Gerard Comeau of Tacadie, New Brunswick was fined almost $300 for bringing more than 14 cases of beer into the province. (New Brunswick is home to laws that restrict the amount of alcohol that can be brought across its border.) The charge was later overturned at the New Brunswick Court of Appeal, and a subsequent appeal by the Crown means the country’s top court will wade into the boozy feud.

“It is Cannabis Culture’s position that the LCBO’s control over all recreational cannabis distribution and sale is overly restrictive and amounts…to a form of interprovincial trade barrier.”

lawyer Kirk Tousaw

Now, Cannabis Culture, the marijuana lifestyle brand that once franchised its name to dispensary locations across Canada, has hired prominent cannabis lawyer Kirk Tousaw to apply as an intervenor in the Comeau case. Their application is also being submitted on behalf of 28 other corporations, which collectively operate what the application says are more than 350 cannabis dispensaries across the country.

In their application, Tousaw says that Cannabis Culture believes the upcoming ruling is “of pressing and substantial importance” because provinces “could create barriers to the free trade of cannabis products from Province to Province … and could constitute an infringement of s. 121 of the Constitution Act of 1867.”

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Tousaw is hoping to use the case to dismantle the Ontario government’s planned cannabis monopoly – or at least get the conversation going on it. “It is Cannabis Culture’s position that the [Liquor Control Board of Ontario]’s control over all recreational cannabis distribution and sale is overly restrictive and amounts … to a form of interprovincial trade barrier.” He submits that any province seeking to “exert exclusive control over the distribution and sale of cannabis and cannabis derivative products through a Provincial entity” is in effect creating such an unconstitutional trade barrier. The application asks the Supreme Court to confirm the decision of the New Brunswick Court of Appeal, which rejected the charge against Comeau.

(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Tousaw is a bold cannabis litigator famous for defending the Smith case, which brought arguments over edibles and concentrates to the Supreme Court .

In that case, a man named Owen Smith was arrested for producing cookies and edibles for patients of a dispensary. In his defense, Tousaw strove for the moon, asking the Court to rule entire sections of the country’s drug rules be ruled unconstitutional and to find that cannabis should instead be regulated by the country’s Natural Health Products regime.

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Ultimately, Tousaw didn’t get everything he wanted, but the Supreme Court did rule in his client’s favour, finding that some provisions of Canada’s drug laws were unconstitutional to the extent that they prohibit individuals from procuring and consuming concentrated forms of cannabis as they need it.

Tousaw’s bringing similar determination to the Comeau case. It’s unclear if the Supreme Court will accept Cannabis Culture’s intervenor application, and even if they do, the Court may not seriously consider their arguments. It’s unlikely that the Supreme Court will even mention the word cannabis in their ruling, similar to the lower court decisions in this case.

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There are many parallels between this case and Canada’s proposed legalization plan, and it is likely that claims regarding interprovincial trade of cannabis will continue to be heard by the country’s courts. The 30-gram public possession limit contained in the Cannabis Act could be a significant barrier to interprovincial trade, since you can only cross provincial borders, well, in public.

Tousaw and Cannabis Culture don’t mention the 30-gram limit in their application, but ostensibly if the court confirms the Court of Appeal’s dismissal of the case, a challenge to the public-possession limit could be forthcoming. Stay tuned.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Arkasas: Pulaski, Jefferson Counties Top Medical Cannabis Applications

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Data from Arkansas’ Department of Finance and Administration show that most applications for medical marijuana distribution sites came in for Pulaski County, the state’s most populous county, while the largest number of cultivation applications list Jefferson County.

Each of eight regions in the state will have up to four dispensaries.

The state’s Medical Marijuana Commission was meeting Monday as it whittles down applications from those wanting to take part in a program established to aid people with certain medical conditions. It received 95 applications for cultivation sites and will select no more than five. There are 227 applications for dispensaries. Each of eight regions in the state will have up to four dispensaries.

There are 26 applications for dispensary sites in Pulaski County, plus 22 in Garland County and 17 in Washington County.

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Jefferson County has 13 applications for growing sites.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Quebec Police Continue Zero-Tolerance Policy for Medical Dispensaries

Quebec remains quick and punishing in its response to those trying to sell medical cannabis in the province.

In August of 2016, Quebec City police swooped in to close Weeds: Herbes et curiosités, the city’s first medical dispensary, after only two months of operation. In January of this year, Marc Emery, the self-appointed “Prince of Pot,” tried opening five locations of his Cannabis Culture chain in Montreal. They were shut down in two days. Around the same time, Quebec City police shut down “therapeutic dispensary” la Croix-Verte after four months of operation.

“It’s very clear. There will be no sale of cannabis tolerated in our territory so long as the law is as it is presently.”

Constable David Poitras, spokesperson for the Service de Police de la Ville du Québec

Quebec police are not forgiving of law-flouting dispensaries. Never mind that cannabis will be recreationally legal in nine months, or that wide use of cannabis in places where it’s been recreationally legalized appears to show no ill social effects. It’s against the law, and the law is the only thing Quebec police care about.

Quebec City’s most recent medical dispensary, Cannoisseur, learned that lesson first-hand when it was raided in early October, after four months in operation in the city’s downtown core. A manager was arrested for trafficking in narcotics.

“This is the third business to be established in Quebec City and is the third business where there has been a raid,” said Constable David Poitras, spokesperson for the Service de Police de la Ville du Québec, in an interview with Radio-Canada. “So in Quebec City, at the level of the police department, it’s zero tolerance for this type of trade.”

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Poitras held forth further in an interview with La Presse: “It’s very clear. There will be no sale of cannabis tolerated in our territory so long as the law is as it is presently, which is to say that cannabis is illegal. This was a business that was openly advertised as a dispensary for the sale of cannabis. our investigation showed that no authorization was promulgated by Health Canada and that trade was therefore illegal.”

The members-only dispensary required two pieces of ID, a medication history, and a questionnaire about diagnosis, psychiatric or psychological problems, and personal history with cannabis consumption—all before customers were allowed to pass through a locked door to the room where the cannabis products were kept. Members were required to sign a “terms and conditions” form acknowledging that they understood cannabis was a controlled substance and subject to Canadian federal law, and accepting the risk associated with cannabis possession and consumption. However, a formal medical record was not required.

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Marc-Antoine Hamel, one of Cannoisseur’s three owners, told Le Soleil two weeks ago, “We’re going to try not to do what the other stores did, which is to say close. We’ve really organized ourselves with the city, the police, and two law firms so that we stay open. It’s complicated, but we’ve agreed to ensure that we respect the law.”

Unlike Weeds: Herbes et curiosités, Cannoisseur took pains not to show the available cannabis products to non-members. “We didn’t want to do like Weeds, where you came in and you could see the products, that’s illegal,” Hamel told Le Soleil, adding that la Croix-Verte was shut down for not following the law as well, so Cannoisseur’s goal was to work with criminal lawyers in order to make sure they did things right.

Hamel claimed that Cannoisseur’s owners respected the law and had no wish to break it. “We are fully prepared to work with municipal and police authorities to ensure no one can doubt the legality and legitimacy of our business approach,” he said.

Quebec’s medical cannabis is the most tightly regulated in the country, requiring doctors first to prescribe aggressive synthetic cannabinoids.

However, Cyndi Paré, spokesperson for Quebec police, said at the time that the police force made no agreement with any “marijuana dispensary.” She added that all production, distribution, and sale of cannabis remained illegal unless accredited by Health Canada. “A single producer in Quebec, Hyropothecary de Gatineau, has so far received Health Canada accreditation,” Paré said.

Quebec’s medical cannabis is the most tightly regulated in the country, requiring doctors first to prescribe aggressive synthetic cannabinoids, and then to perform a complete medical assessment on any patient who finds their needs are not met by pharmaceutical synthetics. The guidelines for prescribing cannabis from the Collège des médecins du Québec (Quebec College of Physicians) note that “[t]he use of cannabis for medical purposes is not a recognized treatment” and “an unrecognized treatment can only be used within a research framework.”

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Upon receiving a prescription for medical cannabis, patients are also put onto the Quebec Cannabis Registry and their user-data is contributed to medical research by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and the Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids. The Registry is mandatory: Patients cannot opt out.

In a post two hours after the raid, the Cannoisseur Facebook page shared an article about the raid with the heading, “On break for the day.” A follow up comment from the page owners read, “Police gonna police! We back soon.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Cannabis Dispensaries Open Late in Major Legal Cities

We’ve all had those moments when our cannabis reserves are running low yet it’s too late to hit up our go-to neighborhood dispensary. But with so many locations out there, it’s usually not too late to track down your favorite strain somewhere—if you know where to look. Below, we dug into our Leafly database to find you the dispensaries open the latest in major cities where cannabis is legal.

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From 10 p.m. door closers to 24/7 convenience, you can find what you need at most any hour and get in and out well before closing time.

Arizona

Phoenix

Bloom Phoenix

14 S. 41st Pl., Phoenix, AZ

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

Nature’s Medicines

439 W. McDowell Rd., Phoenix, AZ

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

Herbal Wellness Center

4126 W. Indian School Rd., Phoenix, AZ

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

Encanto Dispensary

2620 W. Encanto Blvd., Phoenix, AZ

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

Urban Greenhouse

630 W. Indian School Rd., Phoenix, AZ

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

YiLo Superstore

841 W Thunderbird Rd., Ste. B, Phoenix, AZ

Hours: 9:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

The Holistic Center

21035 North Cave Creek Rd., Phoenix, AZ

Hours:

9:00am – 10:00pm, Monday – Saturday

10:00am – 8:00pm, Sunday

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Northern California

San Francisco 

Barbary Coast

952 Mission St., San Francisco, CA

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

Grass Roots

077 Post St., San Francisco, CA

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

SPARC SF

1256 Mission St., San Francisco, CA

Hours: 9:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

BASA Collective

326 Grove St., San Francisco, CA

Hours:

8:30am – 10:00pm, Monday – Friday

9:00am – 10:00pm, Saturday

9:00am – 9:00pm, Sunday

Purple Star MD

2520 Mission St., San Francisco, CA

Hours:

9:30am – 10:00pm, Monday – Saturday

9:30am – 8:00pm, Sunday

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Southern California

Los Angeles

Pure Organic Tree

3844 E. First St., Los Angeles, CA

Hours: Open 24/7

Tampa Medical Center

7550 Tampa Ave., #F, Los Angeles, CA

Hours: 10:00am – 3:00am, Daily

710 Gas Station

4469 Whittier Blvd., Los Angeles, CA

Hours:

9:00am – 2:00am, Monday – Thursday

9:00am – 3:00am, Friday – Sunday

King Kush Collective

5919 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, CA

Hours:

8:00am – 1:00am, Sunday – Thursday

8:00am – 2:00am, Friday – Saturday

Lala Land Collective

10924 S. Main St., Los Angeles, CA

Hours:

8:00am – 1:00am, Sunday – Thursday

8:00am – 2:00am, Friday – Saturday

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Colorado

Denver

Kind Love

4380 E. Alameda Ave., Denver, CO

Hours:

10:00am – 12:00am, Monday – Saturday

11:00am – 12:00am, Sunday

Nature’s Best Recreational

4601 E. Mississippi Ave., Denver, CO

Hours:

8:00am – 11:45pm, Monday – Saturday

10:00am – 11:45am, Sunday

The Green Solution – 20th Ave at Edgewater

6020 W. 20th Ave., Denver, CO

Hours: 8:00am – 11:45pm, Daily 

Boulder

Green Tree Medicinals

5565 Arapahoe Ave., Ste. G, Boulder, CO

Hours:

8:00am – 8:00pm, Monday – Wednesday

8:00am – 10:00pm, Thursday – Saturday

9:00am – 6:00pm, Sunday

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Nevada

Las Vegas 

Reef Dispensaries – North Las Vegas

1366 W. Cheyenne Ave., North Las Vegas, NV

Hours: Open 24/7

Reef Dispensaries – Las Vegas

3400 Western Ave., Las Vegas, NV

Hours: 7:00am – 3:00am, Daily

The Apothecary Shoppe

240 W. Flamingo Rd. #100, Las Vegas, NV

Hours: 8:00am – 3:00am, Daily

Pisos

4110 S. Maryland Pkwy. Ste. 01, Las Vegas, NV

Hours: 10:00am – 3:00am, Daily

Exhale Nevada

4310 Flamingo Rd., Las Vegas, NV

Hours: 9:00am – 1:00am, Daily

Reno

Blum – Reno

1085 S. Virginia St., Reno, NV

Hours:

9:00am – 10:00am, Sunday – Thursday

9:00am – 12:00am, Friday – Saturday

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Oregon

**Due to Oregon’s cannabis laws regarding dispensary hours, many locations stay open until 10:00pm, past which point they must close. Below, we highlight dispensaries are open from the earliest opening time to 10:00pm—many others are also open until 10:00pm.

Portland

Green Front

6814 N.E. Glisan St., Portland, OR

Hours: 7:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

Nectar – Lents

5918 S.E. 89th Ave., Portland, OR

Hours: 7:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

Nectar – Sandy

3350 N.E. Sandy Blvd., Portland, OR

Hours: 7:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

One Draw Two

11711 N.E. Halsey St., Portland, OR

Hours: 7:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

Nectar – Mississippi

125 N. Mississippi Ave., Portland, OR

Hours: 7:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

Nectar – Barbur

10931 S.W. 53rd Ave., Portland, OR

Hours: 7:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

La Mota Southeast Portland

435 S.E. 52nd Ave., Portland, OR

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

AmeriCannaRx

8654 N.E. Sandy Blvd., Portland, OR

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

La Mota Northeast Portland

4999 N.E. 99th Ave., Portland, OR

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

Oregon’s Finest

1327 N.W. Kearney St.., Portland, OR

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

Oregon’s Finest HQ

36 N.E.Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Portland, OR

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

The Flowershop Powellhurst

12550 S.E. Division St., Portland, OR

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

The Green Remedy

12447 S.E. Powell Blvd., Portland, OR

Hours: 8:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

Bend

DiamondTREE – Eastside Bend

715 N.E. Hwy 20, Bend, OR

Hours: 9:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

Oregrown – Bend, Oregon

1199 N.W. Wall St., Bend, OR

Hours: 9:00am – 10:00pm, Daily

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Washington

Seattle 

Fweedom Cannabis – Seattle

12001 Aurora Ave. N. Unit 1, Seattle, WA

Hours: 8:00am – 12:00am, Monday – Saturday

10:00am – 9:00pm, Sunday

Star 21

11042 First Ave. S., Seattle, WA

Hours: 8:15am – 12:00am, Monday – Saturday

9:00am – 11:00pm, Sunday

Trees Pot Shop

10532 Greenwood Ave. N., Seattle, WA

Hours: 9:00am – 12:00am, Daily

Clutch Cannabis – Seattle

11537 Rainier Ave. S. (Main Unit), Seattle, WA

Hours: 8:00am – 11:45pm, Daily

Have a Heart – Belltown

115 Blanchard St., Seattle, WA

Hours: 8:00am – 11:45pm, Daily

Have a Heart – Greenwood

300 N.W. 85th St., Seattle, WA

Hours: 8:00am – 11:45pm, Daily

Have a Heart – Fremont

316 North 36th Street, Seattle, WA

Hours: 8:00am – 11:45pm, Daily

Herban Legends

55 Bell St. #100, Seattle, WA

Hours: 8:00am – 11:45pm, Daily

Uncle Ike’s – Seattle

310 E. Union St., Seattle, WA

Hours: 8:00am – 11:45pm, Daily

Ruckus – Seattle

1465 E. Republican St., Seattle, WA

Hours: 8:00am – 11:45pm, Daily

Grass & Glass – Seattle

14343 15th Ave. N.E., Seattle, WA

Hours:

8:00am – 11:45pm, Monday – Saturday

10:00am – 10:00pm, Sunday

Mary’s – Seattle

12230 Aurora Ave. N., Seattle, WA

Hours:

8:00am – 11:45pm, Monday – Saturday

10:00am – 10:00pm, Sunday

Ponder

2413 E. Union St., Seattle, WA

Hours: 10:00am – 11:45am, Daily

Spokane

The Hidden Joint Recreational – Spokane

6620 North Market Street Suite 100, Spokane, WA

Hours: 8:00am – 12:00am, Daily

The Vault – Spokane

213 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane, WA

Hours:

8:00am – 11:00pm, Monday – Thursday and Sunday

8:00am – 12:00am, Friday

9:00am – 12:00am, Saturday

4:20 Friendly – Spokane

1515 S. Lewis St., Spokane, WA

Hours:

8:00am – 10:00pm, Sunday – Wednesday

8:00am – 12:00am, Thursday – Saturday

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British Columbia

Vancouver

Sea to Sky Alternative Healing Society – Vancouver

6636 Fraser St., Vancouver, BC

Hours: 9:00am – 11:00pm, Daily


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

‘Reasonable Access’: This Court Case Could Decide the Future of Ontario Dispensaries

It’s Monday morning, September 25, in courtroom number nine in Toronto’s Osgoode Hall, and lawyer Paul Lewin is sweating.

He reaches into a green Kleenex box and dabs his brow. Outside, it’s oppressively humid and the lawyers, still arriving, carry warmth into the room as they enter. They settle in and lift heavy binders from their large wheeled briefcases, their faces glowing under the courtroom lights. Lewin pours a glass of ice water. “Gin and tonic pull?” he says, offering the cup to a member of his counsel.

The city is seeking an immediate closure to the Canna Clinic dispensaries. Lawyers are attempting to intervene on behalf of 14 medical cannabis patients.

Lewin and co. are metaphorically steeling their nerves for what is to follow, a two-day hearing that pits the City of Toronto against Canna Clinic, with precedent-setting implications.

The city is seeking an immediate closure to the Canna Clinic dispensaries that are operating within the municipality. Lewin and his counsel are representing Canna Clinic and attempting to intervene on behalf of 14 medical cannabis patients. They’ve also filed a separate motion of notice to the court, challenging the constitutionality of the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations, which doesn’t include dispensaries. Dispensaries, they will argue, are part of reasonable access.

At one point, Canna Clinic, a British Columbia-based company, had seven dispensaries operating across Toronto. After repeated raids, they are currently down to two storefronts, one of which was raided in early September, with police seizing nearly 500 pounds of bud, oil, and shatter. If the city is successful in seeking an interim injunction, it will shut down the dispensaries in a way that repeated raids have, so far, been unable to.

“This is the big one,” Toronto cannabis lawyer Jack Lloyd said in the days leading up the hearing. “It’s really going to be the determinant of the future of dispensaries in Ontario.”

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The Mail-Order Mess

On Monday morning, Lloyd settles into the back row of the small courtroom, sandwiched between a couple of journalists. A number of lawyers are here to watch the proceedings and with every seat taken they lean against the walls, or sit on the floor, laptops and notepads propped up against their knees. Tomorrow, to accommodate the crowd, the hearing will be moved to a larger room on the second floor.

There is greater harm in closing the dispensaries, the lawyers imply, then letting them operate—even if the government is uncomfortable with their presence.

Lewin is addressing the judge. He says she will hear two recurring themes from his side, the first being that all the problems with Canada’s medical cannabis regime stem from the broken mail-order system. He will also argue that the people who are affected by shuttered dispensaries are society’s most vulnerable. There is greater harm in closing the dispensaries, this argument implies, then letting them operate—even if the government is uncomfortable with their presence.

The mail-order system, Lewin argues, strips patients off on-demand access to cannabis, which can lead to hospitalization and long-term health issues. He cites a patient with Crohn’s disease, who waits on average three to five days for his medicine to arrive by mail. Because he lives in a shelter, this means he has to wait outside, sometimes for eight hours, to sign for his package. He has ended up in the emergency room as a result of delayed treatment.

This is not unique, Lewin says. There are many others in similar situations, where one miscalculation on an order form, one delay, can send them to the hospital.

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There are also economic challenges to the mail-order system. Patients need a computer, and computer literacy and payment options are limited, requiring a bank account or a credit card. Canada’s licensed producers of cannabis (LPs) also require minimum purchase orders, on average $75 per order. For those on a fixed income, meeting minimum order requirements is impossible. With storefronts, a patient can access some form of relief with a few dollars, money that would mean nothing to an LP.

Patients are also bound to the LPs they are assigned to, and they can be fired from their service. If a patient wants to switch producers, maybe because they find their LPs prices too high or they are not satisfied with the product line, it’s a tangled three- to six-week process, with paperwork, doctors visits, and services fees ranging from $50 to $100.

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Another byproduct of the mail-order system is packages go missing, often with no refund. There is also, of course, the fact that many don’t want to receive their medicine in the mail, where it can be publicly displayed on their front porch.

“You can even get opioids at a storefront, but only cannabis is so special that it has to be delivered by mail,” Lewin says. Lloyd, watching in the back, pleased with this point, can’t help but pump his first.

A City’s Discontent

In contrast, the city argues that medical access is a ruse, that this is really about Canna Clinic’s private interests and revenues, citing that the seven locations were averaging around $3.5 million in business a month.

(Courtesy of Canna Clinic Toronto)

Canna Clinic, the city argues, also denied their attempts to gather evidence. They refused the city’s request for patient medical records, even anonymized records. In the end, the city received one record out of more than 19,000 members.

There is no information about where Canna Clinic’s product is coming form, or documentation about its clients needs for medical cannabis. Financial disclosures were also refused.

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“Canna Clinic’s requirements don’t come close to what courts require of medical clinics,” the city argues. They say nothing is done to confirm a medical diagnosis, no information is sent to any doctors, and there is no information about dosages or any time limitations on membership.

Later, the judge describes the lack of information about how Canna Clinic operates as a problem for Lewin and his counsel. (“You give me zero evidence and you’ve basically shielded yourself. That’s not good.”)

The city also argues that after repeated raids and bylaw breaches, the dispensaries remain open, which leads to a waste of resources when they are inevitably raided again. They argue that the primary activities of the dispensaries have nothing to do with medical cannabis, that it’s only incidental based on the number of members. There is no constitutional right to access via dispensary, the city says.

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“The federal regime provides that access,” the city argues. “If we authorize them to continue, we authorize their practices without regulation.”

Does a Win for Dispensaries Require an Activist Judge?

Last month, in a case in Hamilton, a neighboring city of Toronto, a judge allowed a dispensary to remain open provided it only sells cannabis to medical patients. The City of Hamilton had been seeking to shut it down. When this case is raised in court on the second day, the judge appears indifferent.

“I don’t care what’s happening in Hamilton,” she says, leaning back in her chair, arms spread at her sides to emphasize her point.

The City continues, “The government of Ontario made it clear that they expect the new system be run under government authority,” they say. “So illicit cannabis dispensaries are not legal now and they won’t be legal then.”

If the judge rules that dispensaries can remain open, she would be overriding three levels of government that want the dispensaries shuttered.

When the hearing closes on the second day, the lawyers and journalists and spectators stream out of the room. One of those lawyers is Russell Bennett, who represents a few dispensaries in the city and made the 1998 documentary, STONED: Hemp Nation on Trial, which aired on the CBC.

“It’s not looking good for the dispensaries,” he says, noting that the impression he got, when the judge was speaking and taking notes, was that she might be building a case against the dispensaries. If the judge rules that the dispensaries can remain open, she would be overriding three levels of government—municipal, provincial, and federal—who have all made it clear they want the dispensaries shuttered.

“This would be a large political statement form the judge,” Bennett says. “It would be a huge political stance.”

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Despite Canada’s government promising to legalize cannabis by July 2018, they have also encouraged hundred of raids across the country since taking power. Simple possession arrests have also continued. Currently, there are an estimated 60 to 80 dispensaries operating in Toronto, but the clock is ticking. How much time they have left is anyone’s guess, and up to the judge now. There is no timetable for when she will make a decision.

“The beating heart of this case,” Lewin said at the end of the second day, “is the fact that the mail-order system is not working and if the Canna Clinics are shut down its going to be the sickest, oldest, poorest, the most vulnerable who are going to suffer greatly.

“I think years from now we’re going to wonder what all the fuss was about.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Given a Monopoly on Ontario Store Product, Licensed Producers Push for Online Sales

The Ontario government’s recently unveiled framework for distribution and sales of recreational marijuana has come under fire from dispensary owners and other stakeholders who will be marginalized by it. But even stakeholders who stand to benefit the most from the framework see room for improvement.

On September 8, the province announced that the Liquor Control Board of Ontario, a government-run corporation, will have a monopoly on the distribution and sales of recreational cannabis when it becomes legal next year, selling it at dozens of standalone storefronts and online.

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In his response, the head of Aphria, one Canada’s biggest licensed producers, acknowledged that the framework will be a boon to the profit margins of big producers. “Selfishly, I’m really glad to see that the supply chain through the Ontario brick-and-mortar stores, and online, is coming from licensed producers across the country,” CEO Vic Neufeld told the Financial Post.

“From an organizational perspective, it’s now simple for us; we’ll be dealing with one Ontario retailer rather than many. We don’t have to focus on the retail side of our business in that province.”

Jordan Sinclair, Canopy Growth Corporation

“We now have the guidance and clarity we need to move forward,” Jordan Sinclair, spokesperson for Canopy Growth Corporation, a big licensed producer, told Leafly. “From an organizational perspective it’s now simple for us; we’ll be dealing with one Ontario retailer rather than many. We don’t have to focus on the retail side of our business in that province. We can focus instead on the production side—work out how we’re going to get our product onto store shelves.”

But Canopy Growth and some other big producers believe the plan could be better; they want to be able to sell to consumers directly.

Canopy Growth has enhanced its online sales operations in the hopes of doing just that. When the province unveiled its plan, the Ontario-based producer issued a statement calling on the government “to consider allowing existing licensed producers to continue their e-commerce sales if [that would] allow for a more cost-effective, expeditious, and varied sales model for Ontarians.”

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“We have established ourselves as an e-commerce business. We can [sell cannabis] in a responsible way and we would like the province to take that into consideration,” Sinclair told Leafly. “This has been our message all along.” He said he is hopeful because the province’s framework “leaves some wiggle room” when it comes to online sales.

His thoughts are echoed by the head of Cronos Group, which owns and operates two licensed producers. “I would like to see Ontario licensed producers have the ability to make direct e-commerce sales to Ontarians,” CEO and chairman Michael Gorenstein told Leafly. “Given these producers’ demonstrated ability to safely and compliantly handle e-commerce distribution under the medical framework, it would be a low-cost and natural transition that would supplement the [province-run] store fronts.”

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The Cannabis Canada Association, which represents the majority of the country’s licensed cannabis producers, released a statement calling for “the expansion of e-commerce mail-based distribution and retail of medical cannabis by licensed producers to include adult-use cannabis.” That would support the “immediate logistical problem” of providing adequate supply and access for Ontario adults, said the association, “and it would support a smooth and rapid transition to legalized cannabis.”

Ontario plans to have 40 cannabis stores open when legalization hits next July, and many industry insiders and analysts say that won’t be enough to meet demand.

Ontario plans to have 40 standalone cannabis stores operational when recreational marijuana becomes legal next July, and many industry insiders and analysts say that won’t be enough to meet demand. (The province plans to have 150 stores up and running by 2020.)

Some producers have also expressed an interest in selling to consumers at retail outlets that are not run by the province in much the same way beer, wine and liquor are.

Smaller cannabis producers have greater misgivings about the province’s framework, claiming that it gives an unfair advantage to big corporations that have financial resources, lobbying power and expertise to win supply contracts with the LCBO. “It’s [possible] that smaller producers will experience more pressure in an environment with fewer independent retailers,” Dan Sutton, the founder of Vancouver-based marijuana producer Tantalus Labs, told The Canadian Press.

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But nothing is set in stone, says Sinclair. “Cannabis regulations will have to undergo constant evaluation. If the system isn’t working after 18 months, changes can be made,” he said, adding that craft growers could eventually gain a foothold in the Ontario market much the same way craft brewers have in recent years. “You can’t always get it right on the first pass.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

12 Minority-Owned Cannabis Businesses That Are Shaping the Industry

In the fight to end the war on drugs, one fact of cannabis prohibition has been prominent throughout history: that people of color are disproportionately affected by cannabis-related arrests and convictions. Although white and black Americans use cannabis at equal rates, people of color are four times more likely to be arrested for cannabis possession. Even in states where cannabis is legal, people of color are still twice as likely to face a cannabis charge.

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As the cannabis industry becomes more robust, one way to help combat the war on drugs and its devastating effects on minority Americans is to support your local minority-owned cannabis companies. This is far from a complete list, but here are some great cannabis companies that are owned and operated by minority business owners.

Panacea Valley Gardens

Based out of Oregon, Panacea Valley Gardens is a medical cannabis cultivation facility owned by the co-founder and chairman of the Minority Cannabis Business Association (MCBA), Jesce Horton. He also owns Panacea, an adult-use dispensary.

In 2016, Horton began developing a new vertically-integrated cannabis cultivation hub known as Saints Cloud. The facility is expected to have a 20,000 foot cultivation space, a dispensary, an onsite processing plant, and water recycling, solar paneling, and a heat exchange system for maximum energy efficiency. Eventually Horton hopes to add an event space, cannabis lounge, and bed & breakfast.

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Hollingsworth Cannabis Company

Hollingsworth Cannabis is a family affair involving three generations of the Hollingsworth clan. Located in Washington, this Tier III I-502 licensed cannabis producer and processor offers cannabis flower and infused, triple filtered cannabis oil at a number of different retailers across the state.

Raft Hollingsworth III (also known as RT3) works alongside his father, Raft Hollingsworth, Jr., two sisters, and even their 96-year-old grandmother, Dorothy Hollingsworth. With a commitment to environmentally friendly practices, Hollingsworth uses naturally sustainable growing and harvesting practices to ensure that the company’s carbon footprint remains as small as possible.

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Simply Pure

Simply Pure, a dispensary in Denver, Colorado, is the brainchild of Wanda James and her husband, Scott Durrah. After a successful run at managing Caribbean restaurants, consulting companies, and even a bid for Congress, Ms. James saw a need to shed light on social justice issues related to cannabis. Her brother was arrested and charged with a felony for the possession of cannabis when he was still a teenager, and she saw his future branded with an irreversible mark. In wanting to put a new face on cannabis, she and her husband are aiming to change how the world views cannabis and especially people of color involved with cannabis.

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99th Floor

Miguel Trinidad, the brain behind 99th Floor, was a renowned chef of Filipino cuisine when he decided to embrace cannabis with his own invite-only pop-up infused dinners. Trinidad hails from Dominican Republic, but spent time in the Philippines studying the local cuisine before opening a restaurant with his partner, Nicole Ponseca, in New York called Maharlika.

New York has very strict cannabis laws; ergo any invitations to this dinner are exclusive and very hush-hush. Trinidad carefully curates an entire multi-course meal that revolves around the strain chosen for each dinner. Less discreet is Trinidad’s new line of edible products and more gourmet pop-up dinners that will be available on the California cannabis market.

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The American Cannabinoid Clinics

The American Cannabinoid Clinics is made up of a family of physicians who combined their respective fields to help thousands of patients in California, Oregon, and Washington seeking answers about medical marijuana. Dr. Janice Knox spent 35 years working in medicine, but when she retired, she continued to hear from patients that had questions about using medical cannabis.

Knox teamed up with her husband, Dr. David Knox, who has 37 years of clinical experience in Emergency Medicine, as well as both of her daughters; Dr. Jessica Knox, who specializes in Preventive Medicine, and Dr. Rachel Knox, who studied Family and Integrative Medicine. Together, the Knoxes have spent the last six years treating thousands of patients across the Pacific Northwest.

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Supernova Women

Supernova Woman is an organization formed by Women of Color in Cannabis in 2015 to help foster small cannabis business opportunities to become self-sufficient in the industry. The group, founded by Tsion “Sunshine” Lencho, Amber Senter, Nina Parks, Andrea Unsworth, offers a series called Shades of Green to educate communities of color on how to get involved with legislative efforts for cannabis, and how regulations and local politics can affect your business.

Located in California, the organization also offers professional services on how to build your cannabis business and how to stay in compliance. It works with people who have prior cannabis convictions to help get their records expunged, guiding them through the entire legal process. Supernova is especially aimed at creating and fostering a safe space for women of color in the cannabis industry. One of the founders, Andrea Unsworth, also owns the cannabis collective Stash Twist.

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Cali Premium Produce

When Lynwood, California began accepting applications for permits in the Los Angeles County, Priscilla Vilchis jumped at the chance to grow and manufacture cannabis products as a Latina woman in the legal California market. With two medical marijuana cultivation and processing licenses already under her belt in Nevada, she won preliminary approval for a new retail cannabis business, Cali Premium Produce.

In Nevada, one of her flagship brands is cheekily named “Queen of the Desert,” and Vilchis is hoping to expand her flagship products to California. She will also be working on outreach efforts to educate the public and especially older generations in the Hispanic community on the benefits of cannabis.

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Natural Blessing

Corey Stevens wanted to take advantage of the new legal cannabis market in Washington state, but he had no idea of the many obstacles he would have to overcome. Stevens had to fight tooth and nail to get a foot in the door. He applied for a license multiple times, applied for a Conditional Use Permit in the local jurisdiction, and submitted public comments to the county. Though he fought an uphill battle, his persistence paid off. Natural Blessing opened its doors in July 2016 and has been serving the cannabis community ever since.

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Apothecarry

Apothecarry was started by a 36-year-old Michigan State University graduate named Whitney Beatty. Initially Beatty did not set out to enter the cannabis industry; rather, she only looked into cannabis for therapeutic reasons after being diagnosed with anxiety. As Beatty became more and more educated and versed in cannabis knowledge, she didn’t identify with the pervasive image of “stoner culture” that stigmatized cannabis for so long. More and more, she found others who lamented the lack of high-quality storage for cannabis that could keep their stash safely out of reach from children and pets.

Available in the United States and Canada, the Apothecarry line includes its most popular product, the Apothecarry Case, a state-of-the-art Humidor organizational system crafted from hardwood and secured with a dual combination and key lock to prevent kids, pets, or nosy neighbors from seeing or smelling your stash. Not only is Apothecarry challenging long-held cannabis stereotypes, it’s one of the few companies owned by a woman of color and the entire operation was funded by minority investors.

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Euphorium – Oakland

Euphorium in Oakland, California, is a woman-owned non-profit cannabis collective and delivery service. The owner, Charlita Brown, comes from a background in pharmaceuticals and uses her knowledge to make sure that patients’ questions are answered and that they are satisfied with both the product and the services provided. Brown also uses her cannabis collective as a platform to help empower women of color in the cannabis industry.

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Zion Gardens

Aaron McCrary got his start as a cannabis cultivator in Washington state, working first underground and then within the legal medical marijuana market. When Nevada voted to legalize cannabis, he took a chance on the emerging market and is now known as the first black master grower in the state.

Zion Gardens, his 6,000-square-foot facility in North Las Vegas, is growing like a weed, and McCrary has plans to expand to a new building by January 2018. During the hiring process, McCrary goes out of his way to provide opportunities for other people of color, women, disabled individuals, and anyone else who might otherwise be excluded.

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Commencement Bay Cannabis

Commencement Bay Cannabis, the first retail cannabis shop in Fife, Washington, is one of a kind. The Puyallup Tribe, native to the Pacific Northwest, transformed its former high-end cigar lounge, Stogie, into a classy upscale space for retail cannabis customers to peruse menus and make educated purchases. Commencement Bay Cannabis has inspired participation from Puyallup Tribal Council members, the Fife-Milton-Edgewood Chamber of Commerce, and other local business owners. The store celebrates the spirit of Mount Tahoma and the Puyallup River while providing high-quality cannabis in a judgement-free environment.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Michigan Proposal Could Allow Dispensaries to Stay Open Past Dec. 15

Democrat Lawmakers in Michigan have introduced legislation that would allow all existing medical marijuana dispensaries in the state to stay open while they are applying for licenses.

State Sen. David Knezek (D-Dearborn Heights) and Rep. Yousef Rabhi (D-Ann Arbor) introduced the bills in the Senate and House this week to solve a problem recently created by the Michigan Medical Marihuana Licensing Board. The board issued an advisory notifying dispensaries that they should close before Dec. 15, or risk not getting a license, according to the Detroit Free Press.

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Medicinal cannabis was approved in Michigan back in 2008, and dispensaries have since been selling to nearly 220,000 patients while operating in a legal grey area. In 2016, Gov. Rick Snyder signed a package of bills—HB 4209, HB 4210, HB 4827, SB 141, and SB 1014—which together regulate the retail sale of medical marijuana products.

Since then, there has been a lot of back and forth about what to do with Michigan dispensaries—whether to allow them to stay open while applying for licenses, or shut them down until they’re licensed.

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Michigan Live recently reported that the Michigan Medical Marihuana Licensing Board notified existing dispensaries that if they don’t cease operations by Dec. 15 of this year, that could be a possible impediment to getting licensed.

The bills introduced by Knezek and Rabhi would allow dispensaries in Michigan that are still operating on Dec. 15 to apply to the cannabis board for a medical marijuana license, and then stay open until the board decides accepts or rejects the application.

Rabhi’s bill, HB 5014, defines an already-operating medical cannabis dispensary that applies for a license before Feb. 18, 2018, as a “licensee” until the board makes a final decision on the dispensary’s application.

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According to reports, Knezek’s bill is very similar to Rabhi’s.

Rabhi told MLive that it is important to keep the state moving forward on medical cannabis.

“We can’t go back in time. Here in Michigan, we have something very important: safe access. And while the legislation that was passed in 2016 changes the landscape, we can’t let this intermediary period disrupt what we’ve built here in the state,” he said.

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