Tag: Industry

Oregon Issues First Cannabis Recall Over Pesticides

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Liquor Control Commission issued its first recall of recreational marijuana after samples of a type of cannabis were found to contain a level of pesticide residue above the state limit.

The rest of grower Emerald Wave Estate’s 9-pound batch of Blue Magoo marijuana flower can’t be sold until additional testing is complete.

The Blue Magoo marijuana was sold at Buds 4 U in Mapleton, a community 45 miles west of Eugene, The Capital Press reported. The commission, which oversees retail sales of recreational cannabis, said people who bought the product should return it to the retailer or throw it out.

The retailer notified the agency immediately after spotting the failed pesticide reading in the state’s cannabis tracking system, commission spokesman Mark Pettinger said. The shop sold the brand to 31 customers March 8-10.

Pettinger said a wholesaler shipped the cannabis to the Mapleton store before the test results were entered in the tracking system.

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“The retailer was great,” he said. “They get the gold star.”

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission said the samples failed a test for pyrethrin levels. They are a mixture of six chemicals that are toxic to insects, according to the National Pesticide Information Center based at Oregon State University.

Pyrethrins are found in some chrysanthemum flowers and can be used on organic products in some cases.

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With the legalization of recreational marijuana, growers are facing a new regulatory structure. Because the federal government still considers the drug illegal, states had to establish their own rules for pesticides and cannabis. Oregon tests for 59 active ingredients.

The testing was done by GreenHaus Analytical Labs, which is certified by the state to test cannabis for potency, water content and pesticide residue.

The rest of grower Emerald Wave Estate’s 9-pound batch of Blue Magoo marijuana flower can’t be sold until additional testing is complete.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Ohioans Seek Residency Requirement for Cannabis Cultivation

REYNOLDSBURG, Ohio (AP) — Some Ohioans wanting to start a medical marijuana business are urging regulators to add a residency requirement, at least initially, for businesses getting the state’s few lucrative cultivator licenses.

The Ohio Department of Commerce currently plans to award up to 12 large grow licenses and 12 small grow licenses statewide based on criteria including a company’s business plan, security measures and experience. The rules now don’t require that growers be Ohio residents, although proof that a company is headquartered in Ohio, owned by Ohioans and plans to hire in-state workers is part of the review.

Many Ohioans speaking at a public hearing this week in the Columbus suburb of Reynoldsburg on the proposed medical cannabis growing rules urged state regulators to add a residency requirement for grower licensing.

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“We’re the ones who fought for this,” said Kelly Mottola, owner of Hydro Innovations in Hilliard. “Allowing people from outside the state is not benefiting Ohio or Ohioans or our unemployment.”

Kevin Schmidt, of the Marijuana Policy Project, believes it could prove difficult for Ohio entrepreneurs to compete for licenses with more experienced out-of-state companies. But Jason Kabbes, a cannabis cultivator based in Oregon, said there are likely other native Ohioans living out of state who would want to work in the industry back home.

“When you say these other folks in the industry are outsiders, they care about cannabis just as much as anybody and may care as much about Ohio as much as you guys,” Kabbes said.

Residency requirements have been included in several other states’ medical and recreational marijuana programs.

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A panel of state lawmakers will review the rules, which must be finalized by May 6.

Other proposed rules discussed at the hearing would require large cultivators to pay a $20,000 application fee, $180,000 license fee and $200,000 annual renewal fee. Small growers would have to pay a $2,000 application fee, $18,000 first-year licensing fee and $20,000 annual renewal fee.

Ohio’s medical marijuana law permits residents with one of the state’s pre-approved medical conditions and diseases to buy and use cannabis only if such treatment is recommended by a physician.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Outcast to Entrepreneur: Olympic Champion Ross Rebagliati’s Cannabis Redemption

Nagano, 1998

Ross Rebagliati of Canada skis to victory in the first-ever Men's Giant Slalom snowboarding competition Sunday Feb. 8, 1998 in Yamanouchi, Japan. (Robert F. Bukaty/AP)Canada’s Ross Rebagliati rides to victory in the first-ever men’s giant slalom snowboarding competition, Feb. 8, 1998, in Yamanouchi, Japan. (Robert F. Bukaty/AP)

If the name Ross Rebagliati sounds familiar, it may be because two decades ago he became the world’s most famous—and then infamous—snowboarder within the span of 72 hours.

The 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, represented snowboarding’s entry into the pantheon of Olympic sports. For some, it was still too early. Jake Burton had shaped his first board only 21 years earlier. The sport’s culture remained steeped in punk style and an attitude of youthful rebellion. Norway’s Terje Haakonsen, one of the world’s top riders, famously boycotted Nagano because he believed the commercialism of the Olympics cut against the cultural ethos of snowboarding. That culture included, for many, the embrace of cannabis—which had never found much favor with the uptight ski crowd.

”I’ve worked too hard to let this slip through my fingers.”

Ross Rebagliati, fighting to keep his medal

Rebagliati, a Canadian favorite in the giant slalom, was highly ranked entering the competition. He was already a veteran of snowboarding’s world tour, but the media attention and pressure in Nagano was something he’d never experienced.

“It was a lot different than the world tour, that is for sure,” he said. “I was having trouble dealing with all the jet lag. I was having trouble sleeping too, along with all the press, and the security around. It was pretty tense.”

Nevertheless, on Feb. 8, 1998, Rebagliati overcame the elements on the mountains outside Nagano. His first run was solid but unspectacular, and it left him in eighth place with a lot of time to make up. After enduring several delays, Rebagliati bolted out of the starting hut and put together the run of his life. With nothing to lose—there are no medals for eighth place—Rebagliati fearlessly carved his way down the mountain slope, as one of the announcers put it: “It is time to carve, or starve.” Rebagliati shredded his way down the mountain. At times it looked like he was struggling to stay on the board as he blitzed through the slalom course.

When he crossed the finish line, he knew he had something great. He gave an intense fist pump at the end of the run before raising his hands in celebration. He had crashed the party, jumping from eighth place to first in a single run.

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Seven competitors followed him. One by one, each tried and failed to beat his overall time of 2:03.96. When fellow Canadian teammate Jasey-Jay Anderson clocked in at 2:11.33, nearly eight seconds slower than Rebagliati, the gold medal was his.

For Rebagliati, this was the crowning achievement of his life.

A wave of relief overwhelmed him. After training and competing every day for ten years, Rebagliati finally got the payoff of his dreams. He was an Olympic gold medalist. A hero in his Canadian homeland. Nobody could ever take that away from him.

Or so he thought.

Three Days to Celebrate

The next three days passed in a blur of podium ceremonies, 3am celebrations, scrawled autographs, and congratulatory phone calls. Then, on the afternoon of the third day, one of Rebagliati’s coaches came to his hotel room with unsettling news.

It was the drug test, the coach told him. Rebagliati immediately knew what it was for: THC.

He hadn’t smoked in months. Other than a few parties here and there during the lead-up to the Olympics, where Rebagliati was around friends who were enjoying cannabis, he hadn’t consumed in almost a full year. 

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Olympic officials wanted to speak to him about it. So did the Nagano police.

That evening, Olympic officials asked him to return his medal. That night, local law enforcement officials questioned him about his cannabis use. They did not let him return to the Olympic village. Less than three days after winning an Olympic gold medal, Ross Rebagliati was arrested, stripped of his possessions and stuck in a Japanese jail cell.

How Did This Happen?

Canadian Olympic gold medalist Ross Rebagliati and NBC Tonight Show host Jay Leno, left, gesture to the studio audience as they joke about marijuana use Monday, Feb. 16, 1998 during taping of the show in Burbank, Calif. Rebagliati nearly lost the gold medal in snowboarding when a routine drug test showed evidence of marijuana in his system. Rebagliati was allowed to keep the gold medal. (/Susan Sterner/AP)Rebagliati and Jay Leno gesture to the studio audience as they joke about marijuana use on the Tonight Show, one week after Rebagliati nearly lost the gold medal when a drug test showed evidence of THC in his system. (Susan Sterner/AP)

The next morning, Rebagliati’s situation led all newscasts around the world. Gold medal snowboarder arrested on marijuana charges. For anyone familiar with the skier-vs-snowboarder, snobs-against-the-slobs feud playing out on the mountains of North America and Europe, Rebagliati’s failed drug test and arrest fit neatly into a stereotypical groove. As the sun rose around the world, Ross Rebagliati found himself cast in a role that he spent years trying to escape: That Canadian snowboarder. You know the one. The gold medalist DQ’d for weed.

”You could find some hash in Europe, and smoke a little bowl to some Frank Zappa and reggae.”

Rebagliati on the snowboarding world tour

Meanwhile, Rebagliati felt like screaming: I didn’t do it!

”I’ve worked too hard to let this slip through my fingers,” Rebagliati said that morning in a statement read by Canadian Olympic officials.

He was ready to fight. But he couldn’t do it alone. He argued like a queen’s barrister before Canadian Olympic officials, and convinced them to back him rather than banish him. To this day, Rebagliati maintains that he did not consume cannabis on the lead up to the Olympics, rather he was around friends who were consuming, and the positive test was the result of being around second-hand smoke.

The Canadian Olympic Committee appealed the decision. Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien voiced his public support for Rebagliati.

In the end, Olympic officials had to concede that cannabis was not on the official IOC banned substances list. One week after his arrest, IOC officials returned the gold medal to the Canadian champion. But Rebagliati knew the hardware no longer held the promise of a glorious, unlimited future. He was broken. He hadn’t slept in 72 hours. His name was tarnished. His career was over. He left Nagano on the next available flight, wondering what kind of life awaited him back home.

Prelude to a Mighty Fall

An ocean away and twenty years removed from Nagano, Rebagliati today revels in his life in Kelowna, a thriving mountain resort town. He is now a family man, happily married with three small kids. Five ski resorts are within a two-hour drive from his house. Two of the biggest resorts in Canada are an hour away.

On a recent weekday, Rebagliati skied down the freshly powdered slopes of Big White Ski Resort east of Kelowna. Watching Rebagliati carve the run was mesmerizing. He’s 45 now but still in tremendous shape. His snow-boarding years are behind him. Nowadays he sticks to skis when he’s up on the slopes. The old skier-snowboarder feud is dead and buried, and Rebagliati has nothing to prove.

That wasn’t always the case. He began snowboarding in the early 80s as a child in the Vancouver area, during a time when many ski resorts didn’t allow snowboards on the slopes.

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After high school, Rebagliati moved to the Whistler area to hone his skills, living on bummed scraps while testing himself against many of the best freeriders in the world. He competed in his first World Series of Snowboarding in 1988, at age 17. He turned pro three years later.

“By the time 92-93 rolled around, I was immersed in the World Cup tour, spending most of my year in Europe competing there,” Rebagliati recalled.   

The World Cup was where he started to consume cannabis on a regular basis—and not just for relaxation. He found it helpful in training, too.

“My routine was wake up in the morning, do the routine for the day: train, workout with weights, and then at the end of the day, it was time,” Rebagliati said. “You could find some hash in Europe, and smoke a little bowl to some Frank Zappa and reggae, just loving it.”

That was Rebagliati’s routine for years. Then he joined a new snowboarding world tour–one that that sent their top-ranked athletes to the 1998 Nagano Olympics.

Rebagliati was among the favorites to lead Canada’s first Olympic snowboarding team. He knew there would be drug testing at Nagano, and he would not allow that to get in the way of his lifelong dream. 

“I think the Olympic dream is so big that you just don’t care what the rules are. You are like, oh, those are the rules? Okay, I am going to follow the rules,” he said. “I was going to do anything to compete there. I don’t think an athlete would give up that opportunity just to smoke some.” 

So Rebagliati gave up consuming cannabis for most of the year leading up to the 1998 Olympics.

“For me, it was no big deal,” he added.

He continued to train like he was, without consuming cannabis, hanging out with his pals from the world snowboard tour and preparing for the biggest race of his life.

With One Test, It All Went Away

(Leafly)Rebagliati standing inside the Ross’ Gold grow facility, RG Private Reserve, in March 2017. (Leafly)

“After the test, my career was over.”

Almost every one of Rebagliati’s sponsors bailed on him after Nagano. He lost 20 pounds. “I was traumatized,” he recalled. “It took me quite a few years to… accept what happened,” he said.

He soon retired from the sport into which he’d poured most of his life. He’d been competing professionally for more than a decade, and physically, he started to not be the same. Also, failing a drug test at the Olympics, resulted in the loss of nearly all his sponsors.

“The attention that was put on me was not about my athletic performance any-more,” he said. “Back in 1998, cannabis was super controversial. I didn’t like being ‘that guy.’ I just won a gold medal, and to be recognized not for that but for cannabis,” was too much to take.

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The lucrative X-Games started up the following year, but Rebagliati chose to walk away from the limelight–and damn near all of civilization.

“I went off the grid,” he recalled. For the next 10 years, he had no permanent home. He didn’t pay his taxes, never checked his mail. Rebagliati bounced around Whistler, Vancouver, and Kelowna, flipping houses and working construction.

He struggled financially.

“I was broke enough that I was just eating peanuts. I bought a brand new $80k truck that I didn’t have the money for, and ran out of gas on the side of the road. I had to leave it there. Everyone knew it was mine. It was brand new, special edition, only one in town like it. And it just sat there.”

Friends and neighbors kept asking about the truck. He offered no lies. “Well, I fucking ran out of gas and I didn’t have any money,” he told them.

Repo men eventually came for the truck. Rebagliati confused them by changing the address number on the front of his house.

It started to seem that winning gold wasn’t a blessing. It was more of a curse.

“It was probably a good ten years where my medal stayed in the shit drawer with the screwdriver, ruler, tape measure and all my pencils.”

Along Came Michael Phelps

In early 2009, opportunity finally found Rebagliati once again.

A video of Olympic champion swimmer Michael Phelps hitting a bong at a party hit the internet. If it were you or me, nobody would have cared. But Phelps had created a million-dollar career by pairing Olympic gold medals with a squeaky-clean all-American image.

Rebagliati’s phone began ringing almost immediately. Reporters and producers around the world wanted his comment. “I had a come-to-Jesus moment,” he recalled. “If I am going to stand up for Michael Phelps, then surely I am going to stand up for myself and the industry.”

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Rebagliati leapt into the fray. “I went on the major TV networks to defend Phelps. I was the pro-pot athlete.” He decided to come out of the cannabis closet in front of the entire world. “You might have thought I did that at Nagano, but to really come out and say that it is performance-enhancing and healthy, it blows people’s brains out. They don’t want to hear it. But it is the truth.”

The Phelps episode made Rebagliati start to consider getting into the industry. He was already one of Canada’s most famous and outspoken cannabis advocates. Why not?

The problem was money. Creating a company requires a fair bit of it. And he was still swinging a hammer to make rent. The solution came, fittingly, on the slopes of Whistler.

Enter the Silent Partner

(Leafly)A jar of medicinal cannabis on display at the Ross’ Gold dispensary in Kelowna, BC. (Courtesy of Ross’ Gold)

Patrick Smyth is a Canadian venture capitalist who’s comfortable with risk. He made his fortune creating software to serve online gambling companies. Smyth’s past ventures had names like Wiremix, Keno.com, and Gaming Transactions Inc. He’s an avid snowboarder—and he just happened to grow up in the same Vancouver neighborhood as Ross Rebagliati.

“I was up snowboarding and bumped into a friend who was sitting with Ross,” Smyth recalled. “Ross and I hadn’t seen each other since we were kids.”

They got to talking, and Rebagliati, hearing of Smyth’s venture capital background, gave him his elevator pitch.

“Hey, have you seen these new laws coming on medical cannabis in Canada?” he asked Smyth.

No, Smyth said. He hadn’t.

“This is what the cannabis industry is going to look like in Canada, America, and the rest of the world.”

Rebagliati

Health Canada was in the process of formulating its Marijuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (MMPR), which eventually took effect in 2014. Rebagliati suggested Smyth to consider it. “I’m thinking about opening a [cannabis] business,” Rebagliati told him.

Over the next two weeks, Smyth dug into the whole cannabis thing. He liked what he saw. As an experienced entrepreneur in the online gaming world, Smyth knew opportunity often hid in industries that others were afraid to enter.

Smyth called Rebagliati.

“Hey buddy let’s go snowboarding, eh?”

At the top of the hill they broke for beers. Smyth made his move.

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“I think we have something here,” he told Rebagliati. “I want to be your business partner.”

And so, Ross’ Gold was born.

“I felt like it was the right time—during prohibition—to get involved,” Rebagliati recalled. “We wanted to be a cannabis company during prohibition. That was a point that we wanted to make. We wanted to push the envelope. We wanted the attention of not only my fans and the cannabis culture. We wanted to grab the attention of the government.”

From Junk Drawer to Display Case

(Courtesy of Ross' Gold)An inside view of Ross’ Gold in downtown Kelowna. (Courtesy of Ross’ Gold)

Almost five years later, Rebagliati and Smyth have a thriving dispensary in down-town Kelowna and are laying plans to franchise future locations. They manufacture their own grinders and specialty glass.

The government’s attention has been grabbed. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected to formally propose a nationwide legalization and regulation measure later this year.

The gold medalist is no longer hiding his past. The Nagano medal has moved from the junk drawer to the display case. Laughing, Rebagliati says, “I have a beautiful brand with my name and picture all over it.”

Nowadays he’s loving life. Rebagliati raises his family in Kelowna because of all the things the city has to offer. There are mountain sports everywhere you turn, and Kelowna is a cannabis hub in booming British Columbia. And Rebagliati is a passionate advocate for the industry.

Rebagliati tending to his plants at RG Private Reserve. Rebagliati tending to his plants. (Courtesy of Ross’ Gold)

“There are zero deaths reported due to cannabis,” he said. “That is a pretty loud number. That is probably the loudest zero I have ever heard of.”

He turned reflective. “A lot of people just want to follow the law. They don’t want to go outside that envelope and be a champion for anything.”

“I don’t necessarily want too, but these things have just fallen into my lap,” he said. “I did it with snowboarding. I was snowboarding before it was accepted back in the early 80’s.”

Now he’s doing the same thing with cannabis. Advocating for and investing in a phenomenon that’s still risky, still frowned upon by some, not yet mainstream.

And he loves running the business. Most days Rebagliati will work at the store for a little bit before heading over to the Ross Gold warehouse to check on the company’s grow op.

He closes his day out by swinging by the store and closing up shop. The last thing he does every day is remove his gold medal from the store display and takes it home with him for safe keeping.

“This is what the cannabis industry is going to look like in Canada, America, and the rest of the world. We want to get behind a message of health and wellness, and being the best you can be.” 

As the sun began to set Rebagliati jumped back into his truck—all paid for, with a full tank of gas–and rumbled away down the quiet streets of Kelowna.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

15% of Every Cannabis Harvest Never Makes It to Market. Here’s Where It Goes.

There’s an interesting story hidden in the data that the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (LCB) publishes every month.

The LCB compiles statistics on the weight of cannabis harvested, and the weight of cannabis sold.

Here’s the funny thing: The two numbers almost never match up.

There’s almost always more harvest weight than retail weight sold. Like, a lot more. Over the past 20 months, Washington farmers have brought in a total of 286,962 pounds of harvested cannabis. During that same time period, retailers sold 239,712 pounds.

That makes a difference of 47,250 pounds—23 tons of cannabis harvested but not sold.

Obviously, cannabis doesn’t go straight from the field to the store. It takes weeks to cure it, process it, package, and distribute it.

But still: The gap is there every month.

Where does the missing cannabis go?

I set out to answer that question.

There are larger processors coming into the state who might purchase the entire harvest from multiple farms.

Crystal Oliver

First, it’s important to understand how the LCB records the cannabis weight that appears on its website. When a plant is freshly harvested, it has a “wet weight” that’s 80 to 90 percent more than its “dry weight,” which is its mass after curing.

“There is a pretty significant loss during the process,” explained Will Denman, president of the Washington state producer Solstice Grown. “From wet to dry, it is about 10-1 on weight, in addition to shrinkage you see throughout the post-harvest supply chain.”

But that’s not the source of the gap, because for its harvest weight figures the LCB records only the dry weight of the cannabis plant. That is, its mass after curing.

It turns out that a number of different factors contribute to the gap. Testing, market timing, and the law of supply and demand are three of the major ones.

Testing

Cannabis crops must go through quality assurance testing to make sure that there are no ‘bad’ things in the flower that could harm the consumer. According to the WLCB website, the following are tests that are done to ensure that only quality, untainted cannabis reaches the consumer:

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“The general body of required quality assurance tests for marijuana flowers and infused products may include moisture content, potency analysis, foreign matter inspection, microbiological screening, pesticide and other chemical residue and metals screening, and residual solvents levels.”

Washington LCB spokesperson Mikhail Carpenter said that some of the cannabis a grower harvests could fail QA testing. That batch or crop would then be destroyed.

Monthly Allocation of the Crop

Crystal Oliver is a cannabis farmer and co-founder of Washington’s Finest Cannabis. She and her husband and business partner, Kevin Oliver, have a specific way of doing things when it comes to selling their harvest. They want to make sure they have enough cannabis to sell to their retail partners throughout the year.

“What we have done for the past two years– we harvest in the fall, and we sort of budget our flower to get us through the year,” Crystal Oliver told Leafly. “So we are generating income throughout the course of the year. Generally speaking, you want to do that because the price you would get if you tried to unload your entire harvest in October is not as good if you sell your product throughout the year.”

There’s a limit to how much cannabis flower a farmer can keep on hand, though. According to state regulations, an outdoor grow or a greenhouse operation can store an amount of cannabis equal to 125% the amount of the producer’s yearly harvest. An indoor grower, by contrast, can only have up to 50% of their annual harvest on hand at any one time.

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Cannabis processor licensees are allowed to have a maximum of 50% of their average usable cannabis and 50% average of their total production on their licensed premises at any time.

Cannabis retailers, meanwhile, can store even less product in house. Retailers are allowed to have a maximum of 33% of their average inventory on their licensed premises at any given time.

Working within those limitations requires producers and processors to strategize how they sell their products to retailers throughout the year. A grower can sell their harvest in a one-time sale to a single buyer after harvest, but harvest time is usually when wholesale prices are lowest, because of the glut of product hitting the market.


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Holding back a certain amount of cannabis might be a smarter move, but that’s assuming the stored cannabis remains market-fresh and the wholesale price rebounds from its harvest-season low. And there’s no guarantee that both of those things will happen.

Will Denman of Solstice Grown said many farmers hold some cannabis in reserve just in case an adverse event hits the market and drives up the wholesale price.

“We know several (farmers) who have tonnage that they are simply sitting on, waiting for the drought,” Denman said. Cannabis doesn’t have an indefinite shelf life, though. “It is nonsensical,” Denman argued, “because the cannabis is degrading and losing value. But it’s certainly [the farmer’s] prerogative.”

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As for a drought hitting the cannabis market: There’s no sign of such a thing on the horizon. Cannabis sales continue to grow in Washington. At year’s end cannabis sales topped $1 billion for the first time ever.

Crystal Oliver said that it’s rare to see a single large processor buy up all of a grower’s harvest in one purchase. But that may change. “There are larger processors coming into the state who might purchase the entire harvest from multiple farms,” she said. “But right now there are very few processors who are in a position to do that.”

“We have a relationship with a processor where we sell a portion of our product to them each month,” Oliver added. “They’re one of the top ten processors in the state, but they’re not in a position financially where they can buy our full harvest in October. So we worked it out where they buy a certain amount each month.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

When Seniors Visit a Cannabis Store, There are Questions Aplenty

On Thursday afternoon at Vela, the chic Seattle cannabis retailer, customer Maria Scott had a question for the nice young man doing all the talking about the terpenes.

“What do you have for Parkinson’s?” she asked.

“What do you have for Parkinson’s?” one customer asked.

Scott’s friend, whose walker clanged against Scott’s own, chimed in. “What about arthritis?” she demanded.

Those were some of the many questions that came up during a first trip to the cannabis store for Scott and about a dozen fellow senior citizens from the Sound Vista Village assisted living center in Gig Harbor, Washington.

A visitor from Sound Vista Village holds a cannabis gel product while making a purchase at Vela Cannabis in Seattle, Washington on March 16, 2017. A group from Sound Vista Village, an assisted living facility in Gig Harbor, visited Vela Cannabis. (Photo by David Ryder/Leafly)A visitor from Sound Vista Village holds a cannabis gel product while making a purchase at Vela Cannabis in Seattle. (David Ryder for Leafly)

The outing, part of the center’s Village Concepts University program, aimed to introduce residents to the brave new world of legal cannabis. “We want [our residents] to stay on top of current events, pop culture, what’s going on in the world,” explained Tracy Willis, head of business development for Village Concepts.

So the seniors decamped at Vela’s sleekly designed storefront on First Avenue South, between Safeco Field and the global headquarters of Starbucks.

For Vela staff members, it was a chance to get to know some great potential customers: seniors 65 and older. A recent study in the journal Addiction found that overall cannabis use by baby boomers increased 58% from 2006 to 2013. Researchers found that cannabis use among boomers peaked between ages 50 to 64. Adults 65 and older had a significantly lower prevalence of cannabis use than those in the younger group, but consumption by those in that older age cohort increased by 250% during that same time period. So adults in late middle age tended to consumer more cannabis than those of retirement age–but that seems to be quickly changing.

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Lemon Cheese Cake? She’s In.

Ilene Cohn smells a pipette containing terpenes and essential oils at Vela Cannabis in Seattle, Washington on March 16, 2017. Cohn was part of a group from Sound Vista Village, an assisted living facility in Gig Harbor, that visited Vela Cannabis. (Photo by David Ryder/Leafly)Ilene Cohn smells a pipette containing terpenes and essential oils at Vela Cannabis in Seattle, Washington on March 16, 2017. Cohn was part of a group from Sound Vista Village, an assisted living facility in Gig Harbor, that visited Vela Cannabis. (David Ryder for Leafly)

After a box lunch of sandwiches, chips, grapes and cookies, Vela general manager Erin Green told the group “I know cannabis can be intimidating, so we’re very honored that you chose to be here with us.” She briefed the seniors on the short history of legalization in Washington state, and drew a number of wide-eyed “wows” at the $400 million in cannabis tax revenue brought in since 2014.

Vela’s head grower, John Ulrey, talked them through the indica-sativa split and plant growth stages. Heads nodded among the seniors when he mentioned nutrients and flowering (there may have been some ardent gardeners in the group).

Strains and strain names seemed to puzzle a few of the luncheon guests. One woman offered a stern eyebrow raise at the name Green Crack. Another was surprised to hear that there was a product called Lemon Cheese Cake. “You have something that’s lemon cheese cake?” she wondered aloud.

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Down the hall, where the producer/processor company Suncliff houses its extraction lab, lab director Anthony Dalton passed around tubes containing different terpenes. (Suncliff is not affiliated with Vela, but its lab is housed in the same building.) Myrcene, linalool, limonene, the seniors sniffed them all. “Interesting,” Maria Scott said, handing a tube of limonene to a friend. “That is not so bad.”

Ilene Cohn took a whiff of New York Diesel terpenes. “They smell good,” she said, with her face registering surprise.

Topicals Were Very Popular

Ilene Cohn, left, shops with assistance from Elena Mishko, right, an employee at Vela Cannabis in Seattle, Washington on March 16, 2017. Cohn was part of a group from Sound Vista Village, an assisted living facility in Gig Harbor, that visited Vela Cannabis. (David Ryder for Leafly)Ilene Cohn, left, shops with assistance from Elena Mishko, right, an employee at Vela Cannabis in Seattle, Washington on March 16, 2017. Cohn was part of a group from Sound Vista Village, an assisted living facility in Gig Harbor, that visited Vela Cannabis. (David Ryder for Leafly)

As the visiting seniors were all over the age of 21, they were free to shop after their tour. “Before we set you loose on your shopping spree,” Vela general manager Erin Green told them, they’d probably want to know “what the heck these things are.”

“Most of you probably won’t get to dabbing.”

Vela staff member, to visiting seniors

After a brief lesson on flower, tinctures, vape pens, a staff member touched briefly on dabbing. “Dabbing is a really high level of vaporizing,” she said. “Most of you probably won’t get to that.”

Also: “If anyone’s sharing a cannabis-infused cookie with you, you need to take small bites.” Sound advice for everyone, that.

Then it was on to the sales floor. Scott and Cohn made a beeline for the topicals section. Others lingered over the selection of high-CBD products. As she perused the selection of balms and creams, Scott had a final question. “What’s the best one?” she asked. Spoken like a discerning consumer.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Lessons Learned From a Failed Cannabis Compliance Check

In the legal cannabis industry, it’s incredibly important to pay close attention to local and state regulations to make sure that your shop is always in compliance. Because we’re lucky to be working in the world of legalized cannabis, it’s our duty to show the world that these products can be safe, smart, and well regulated.

When a store fails a compliance check, it’s worth taking a moment to step back and examine why the infraction occurred. Beyond that, take their shortcomings as a lesson for your own cannabis business, and use that knowledge to ensure that your business won’t make the same mistakes.

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Failing Compliance Checks Can Shutter Your Business

One of Washington state’s more prominent cannabis retailers, Lux (formerly known as Stash Pot Shop), announced that it would be closing doors for 15 days starting March 13 due to a failed compliance check. In this instance, it came to light that two former employees failed to enforce the state identification checking standard when selling cannabis to undercover Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (WSLCB) officers.

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The Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board regularly works with underage investigative aides to ensure that cannabis shops do not sell cannabis to minors. Businesses cited for a Sale to a Minor face a 10-day suspension and a $2,500 fine for the first penalty, a 30-day suspension for a secondary penalty, and may face license cancellation for a third violation within three years.

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The Washington state identification checking standard requires the following:

  • Identification MUST be valid (not expired) and show:
    • The bearer’s date of birth,
    • The bearer’s signature (except US Military ID – see below)
    • A photograph of Bearer

Examples of acceptable identification:

  • Driver’s License, Instruction Permit, or ID card issued by any US state, territory, or district
  • Driver’s License, Instruction Permit, or ID card issued by any Canadian Province
  • Valid Washington State Temporary Driver’s License
  • US Armed Forces ID card (encrypted signature acceptable)
  • Merchant Marine ID card issued by the US Coast Guard
  • Official Passport
  • Washington State Tribal Enrollment card.

The WSCLCB may consider mitigating circumstances and allow for some negotiation regarding penalties.

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Lux had already faced a $500 fine for a previous infraction involving standard ID checks. As this was its second infraction, the shop faced a 30-day suspension, which it negotiated down to 15 days and a $3,100 fine. A third violation within a three-year period could result the loss of the business’s cannabis retail license.

Why It’s Crucial to Comply Every Time

When navigating the uncharted territory of regulated legal cannabis, staying in compliance is not always easy. For those who are in a similar situation, building a new cannabis business in an industry that’s just starting to feel established, avoiding a violation like this can mean the difference between staying afloat and falling behind.

Take this as a lesson and take the time to train your employees, emphasizing absolute compliance with state law. Ensure that your employees recognize valid (and invalid) identification, and require that employees always check ID.

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“One of the most common complaints are from people who are obviously of age, not wanting to have their ID scanned. Unfortunately, while a ‘we card everyone under 47’ policy works at liquor stores, bars, etc., scanning every single ID that walks in the door is the only way retailers can truly safeguard their business,” Lux owner KC Franks echoed in a press release on the closure.

How to Turn a Negative Into a Positive

Lux has taken these infractions with a grain of salt, using what could be perceived as a negative and turning it into a positive. During the 15-day closure, Lux is offering compensation to its employees to volunteer and give back to the community. Employees will be volunteering at St. Luke’s Parish serving food to those in need, as well as volunteering for a new cleanup program called “Beautify Ballard.” The location will also be holding a Customer Appreciation Sale on the day it re-opens, March 28.

The location has reacted admirably, choosing to turn this embarrassing oversight into a positive PR move by giving back to the local community while simultaneously taking care of its employees. Its Customer Appreciation Sale also acknowledges its compliance oversight to its patrons and thanks them for their patience and loyalty during its temporary closure.

This is a classic “making lemonade out of lemons” situation from which other cannabis businesses can learn. By being open and honest with the public, Lux makes it easier to forgive the business for its missteps, and locals can rally behind the dispensary for its perception of learning from its mistakes and striving to be better in the future.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

The Benefits of POS System and Dispensary Menu Integration

If you’re the owner or operator of an up-and-coming cannabis dispensary serving customers and patients, one of the most important parts of tracking your sales and revenue will come from your point-of-sale (POS) system. For businesses that are listed on Leafly, one of the best ways to maximize store pages is to integrate Leafly menus and POS systems.

To get the full scoop on POS integration, how it can impact your cannabis business, and how dispensaries listed on Leafly can use it to maximize their listing, we caught up with Leafly’s own client success specialist, James Scott, and developer Andrew Otwell.

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What is POS integration?

POS systems can be integrated with a variety of other tools and functionality. For example, POS menu integration allows a dispensary to automatically feed inventory information into a menu. On Leafly.com, POS menu integration allows a dispensary to automatically feed inventory information to their corresponding integrated menu on our site.

Please note that POS integration on Leafly only updates a dispensary’s menu. All other features of a dispensary’s Leafly profile will still need to be updated manually, but POS integration helps do away with the time-consuming task of updating a large menu.

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How does POS menu integration software work?

This allows a point-of-sale system to push menu items through Leafly’s API directly to a dispensary’s Leafly menu. Once POS integration is enabled (instructions available here)  you will be unable to edit your menu from within Leafly. Instead, all edits must be performed from the POS. Edits you make in the POS will be reflected in the corresponding products on the Leafly menu.

Why should dispensaries use a POS to keep Leafly menus up to date?

With a proper audit of the store’s inventory beforehand, and if a store follows strict formatting procedures when in-taking new product, it will eliminate the need to focus valuable employee hours on updating the menu. For stores that struggle to keep an up-to-date menu, or for stores with a large inventory, it can be an invaluable resource to keep menus accurate for their customers. It also allows clients to use other parts of their Leafly profile that they may have neglected due to the labor of updating their menu.

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What are the biggest pitfalls to consider when setting up Leafly integration with a POS?

The biggest pitfalls going into an integration come from:

  1. Not performing an initial audit of a dispensary’s inventory before turning the integration on. As integration relies on data built into individual products in the POS, if any of them leave the “strain” or “brand” fields left blank or filled out incorrectly, those menu items may be incomplete or missing from the Leafly menu.
  2. Not following a consistent inventory intake procedure. For example, leaving a strain field blank or mismatching the strain also listed in the “name” field can cause inaccurate data to be floating around in your POS. It is possible to fix after the fact, but again, if the goal with POS integration is to spend less time managing menus, formatting products properly the first time will eliminate costly corrections further down the line.

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I have a Leafly listing and want to integrate my POS and menu. Who should I talk to?

Currently Leafly can only integrate with GreenBits POS. Contact your Greenbits representative to get started.

Can I turn it off if it doesn’t work for me?

Absolutely. Your Leafly menu will be left as it was when it was last modified through Greenbits and you’ll be able to edit it in Leafly again. Important note: Don’t be tempted to disable the integration briefly just to make quick manual edits in Leafly (like updating a price). Greenbits works by replacing a Leafly menu with its current inventory data, and won’t first check to see if you’ve made changes outside Greenbits.

Learn how Leafly can grow your business


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

How Much Tax Revenue Do Legal Cannabis Sales Generate?

Countless times I’ve heard people from all around the world argue that “Keeping weed illegal is a big business,” surrendering themselves to the notion of legalization being nothing but a distant pipe dream. Depending on where they live, they’d point to private correctional facilities that benefit from the sentencing of cannabis users, producers, and distributors; to unscrupulous public servants who are not squeamish about taking bribes; to pharmaceutical companies that produce highly addictive and expensive drugs that could be easily replaced with cannabis and its derivatives.

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However, legal cannabis is also big business. Beyond the human, social, and economic benefits generated by legalization, cannabis is an extremely profitable commercial enterprise. I’m not just talking about pot sales, but also hundreds of adjacent opportunities that arise from legalization–think lighting companies, agricultural technology, real estate investment trusts, and so many others.

By exploring some of the most relevant data regarding the cannabis industry’s magnitude and potential, we can gain a better understanding of the way the industry works and the benefits it can produce.

Disparities in Legal Cannabis Sales vs. Total Dollars Spent

Total legal cannabis sales in North America hit $6.9 billion in 2016, with the US accounting for $6 billion. While significant, this number represents less than 13 percent of the total dollars spent on cannabis last year.

The ArcView Group has estimated that only 12.3 percent of the total money spent on cannabis in North America last year ($56 billion) went through the legal system. This means that we’re missing out on taxing more than $49 billion in cannabis transactions, which would translate into roughly $12 billion in new tax revenue.

“Cannabis is a major industry already, but most of the trade is happening in illicit channels that are not being taxed and are not being regulated yet,” Tom Adams, editor-in-cheif of Arcview Market Research, said.

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In addition to highlighting the costs of processing arrests for cannabis possession or distribution, Leslie Bocskor, investment banker and president of advisory firm Electrum Partners, commented, “Imagine how much wealth will be staying in our country [the US], which is currently exiting, going to [drug] cartels in other countries, leaving our economy.”

Colorado, Washington, and Oregon Are Making Big Bucks

According to ArcView’s latest report, medical and adult-use cannabis sales in Colorado, Washington, and Oregon alone generated more than $500.8 million in taxes throughout 2016.

Some perspective: Assuming that the inflation-adjusted median cost of building a school in the US stands at roughly $17.6 million for an elementary school, $28.7 for a middle school, and $48.7 million for a high school, these states could have used the $500.8 million to build approximately:

  • 28 elementary schools, or
  • 17 middle schools, or
  • 10 high schools

If, instead of building schools, these states wanted to feed their inhabitants, they could have provided between 5 billion and 10 billion full meals. A budget of such magnitude would have been enough to provide all of the people living in those three states one full meal for every day of the year. Furthermore, the money left over after feeding everybody would have sufficed to build about nine elementary schools.

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“And that’s with Colorado just barely getting started and Washington having really capped the growth of this business with incredibly high tax rates–37 percent,” Adams pointed out.

Legal Cannabis Sales Are Expected to Reach at Least $20.8 Billion per Year by 2021

And that’s just a conservative estimate that does not contemplate the prospect of cannabis being legalized in several states in the near future. Projections aside, cannabis has proven to be one of the–if not the–fastest growing industries in the world, with sales up 30 percent over 2016 versus 2015. Furthermore, going forward, the growth rate is anticipated to hover around 26 percent per year over the next five years, ArcView revealed. Even in this conservative scenario, the cannabis industry would match the size of the craft beer industry or the entire chocolate market by the beginning of the next decade.

Based on even lower sales estimates, research firm New Frontier Data projected tax revenue of $1.8 billion by 2020. And, this growth (and growth potential) does not only translate into taxes, but also into new jobs and an explosion among industries related to cannabis production and distribution, like lighting, security, software, and agricultural technology.

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“We don’t have sales estimates for cannabis verticals and ancillaries like lighting or software yet, but we believe it’s several multiples of the $6.9 billion in cannabis sales seen in 2016. So, I’d say somewhere in excess of $10 billion, at the very minimum,” ArcView’s Adams added.

If Federally Legal, the Cannabis Market Could Surpass $100 Billion per Year

A few months ago, Viridian Capital Advisors’ founder and president, Scott Greiper, went even further and told me that, according to statistics from Bloomberg, if federally legal, the cannabis industry in the US (including ancillary services) could surpass $100 billion per year, more than doubling the size of the entire wine industry.

To make this figure comprehensible, let’s establish some comparison. $100 billion is comparable to:

  • The combined sales of Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo products all around the world
  • Every transaction made via Amazon.com last year
  • Five times the money Starbucks made in 2016
  • 27 times what Donald Trump is worth (meaning all he owns), and about 33 times what Oprah Winfrey is worth

The Cannabis Stock Index Is Rapidly Gaining

Viridian’s Cannabis Stock index, which tracks most of the main companies in the space–including related businesses–gained 236.1 percent last year. Although the performance of the stocks in the index was very mixed, what this shows is that Wall Street is increasingly realizing how valuable the legal cannabis opportunity really is, Viridian’s Scott Greiper and Harrison Philips told us.

Again, some context: shares of Wall Street darling, Apple, rose only 32.4 percent over 2016. This means cannabis stocks did seven times better than Apple’s–although, of course, the risk implied was very different.

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Also supporting the view that Wall Street is getting behind cannabis were the more than $1.2 billion in investments made in the space. Cultivation and retail companies alone raised almost half a billion dollars from individual investors and funds, while biotech and pharma firms raised almost $350 million, Viridian revealed in January.

“As more states and countries around the world legalize cannabis, there is an ‘Industrial Revolution’ occurring, bringing advanced technologies and new companies into an industry that is just emerging from the shadows,” Greiper concluded. “This is driving opportunities for entrepreneurs and investors to participate across key business segments of the cannabis marketplace, from real estate to biotech and agtech. The cannabis industry is evolving from a social cause to a large, global business.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Anchorage Sales Topped $400K in January

City officials in Anchorage, AK, reported that the city’s four cannabis dispensaries sold around $440,000 to local consumers in January. That generated $22,000 in sales tax for Anchorage. January marked the first full month of city cannabis tax collection.

The total city tax revenue wasn’t that much more than it was in December, when the first shop, Arctic Herbery, opened its doors on Dec. 15. Two other stores opened in the following days.

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Blyss Cruz, a manager in Anchorage’s Treasury Division, told the Alaska Dispatch News that the half-month of sales in December generated $19,880 in sales tax.

Anchorage collected a 5% city cannabis sales tax, which was approved in April 2016. That’s a separate tax from the state excise tax of $50 per ounce of cannabis bud, and $15 per ounce for other parts of the plant.

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According to the Alaska Dispatch News, shops across the state faced supply shortages going into January, which affected business. Only a few Anchorage growers had started producing at that time, leaving the city fairly dry of cannabis during the month.

There are now six cannabis dispensaries open in Anchorage, and 18 across the state of Alaska.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

What Is Influencer Marketing and How Can It Help Cannabis Businesses?

Leafly is the first ever cannabis company to sponsor SXSW, and as we gear up for this year’s festival, we decided to take a look at one of the most crucial pieces of any successful brand: influencer marketing. With cannabis restricted by the federal government, many standard marketing platforms are off-limits. Because traditional marketing efforts off the table, cannabis brands have to be incredibly creative to ensure their campaigns are successful.

We spoke with Dominick Damico, the founder of Adspire, the world’s fastest growing influencer marketing agency dedicated to cannabis, to see how cannabis businesses can make the most of their brand by using outside influencers to boost their audience and maximize their marketing impact.

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Leafly: What is influencer marketing?

Dominick Damico: Influencer marketing is the usage of people and platforms to drive a brand’s message to a target market. The influencer can be a person, a website, or a social media page. Essentially, any person or platform that has influence over an audience can be considered an influencer.

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What are some examples of different types of influencers?

  • Niched: These influencers are typically devoted to a specific market or subject (ex. Cannabis / beauty / sports / etc.)
  • Celebrity: These influencers are traditional celebrity types (artists, athletes, entertainers)
  • Social: These influencers found their fame through social media platforms
  • Micro: These influencers have a small amount of influence, but they can be useful when brands are looking to activate many niches at once
  • Localized: These influencers and their content are typically localized (ex. “Seattle Stoners”)

Influencers can fall under more than one of the categories above. For example, there are localized-micro influencers, and there are social-niched influencers.

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What are some of the challenges of achieving impact through influencer marketing?

The number of followers does not necessarily equal impact. Bigger is not always better. Many brands make the mistake of judging the value of an influencer based on how much influence they possess. Engagement rate is the holy grail of measuring influencer value. This is because a 100k influencer with a 50% engagement rate gets five times more action than a 1 million influencer with a 1% engagement rate. I’ve seen pages with millions of followers that get less engagement than pages 1/10th their size.

Your content and ads will not do well just because they’re going out to a lot of people. There is a misconception that influencers have the magical allure of getting their fans to do what they want. Just because you post your products, content, and ads on influencer platforms in the same industry, doesn’t mean you will get results. They need to be aligned with your content style, focused on value-add, and consist of a well thought out advertisement or post. It’s no different than any other advertising methods. Bad ads and content will always perform badly.

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When do you think paid digital marketing channels may be available to cannabis brands? What about print/traditional marketing?

Hard to say. I’d imagine even if Google, Facebook, etc. does want to get on board, their legal team will give them the thumbs down due to the current federal standing of cannabis. I would guess 3-6 years for USA advertising only, or whenever cannabis is no longer a federally illicit substance in America. As for the rest of the world, I have no clue.

I do believe that print advertising at a local level is easier to access. This is because local print works within the jurisdiction of state lines, where cannabis is legal. It’s different for these digital companies that have an international presence and have much more pressure to abide by federal law compared to the local print companies complying within their jurisdictions.

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Do you have any tips to run a successful influencer marketing campaign?

  • Keep up with social rules and algorithms: Social media platforms are always changing the rules of the game. Companies that don’t stay nimble and up to date on the latest rules can miss out on changes required to maximize success.
  • Keep up with the latest marketing trends: Take some time out of each day to go through Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and platforms of interest. This will help you recognize what is working well for other pages and companies. It helps you to identify successful and unsuccessful marketing strategies without having to spend your own money to find out.
  • Follow page patterns: If an account only does direct photo posts, try to format your marketing campaign so that specific influencer drives your goal with a direct photo post.
  • Be good to the influencers you work with: At the end of the day this is a relationships game. Everyone knows everyone and if you screw over an influencer, other influencers will find out about it and won’t want to work with your company. These influencers get plenty of opportunity. At the end of the day, they are going to want to work with people they like who treat them fairly.
  • If you aren’t sure how to do all of this, outsource it to Adspire: I’ve watched new companies waste thousands of dollars on influencers and campaigns that absolutely bombed due to their lack of expertise. We’ve got the knowledge and experience to make your influencer marketing campaign a success.

You can hear more about influencer marketing at the SXSW Conference. Leafly will be sponsoring a three-part track of cannabis programming, including one keynote speaker and two panels, on March 14, 2017.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.