Tag: Legalization

Nevada Gaming Commission to Discuss Cannabis and Casinos

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The Nevada Gaming Commission hopes to address the problems the state’s legalization of recreational marijuana present during an upcoming special meeting.

The Las Vegas Sun reports the commission will meet Thursday to discuss ways to not allow the state’s gaming companies to be associated with something that is technically illegal.

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Though the state has legalized recreational cannabis, using and selling marijuana is still a violation of federal law.

State gaming laws and regulations specifically prohibit behavior by gaming licensees that would discredit the industry. Nevada’s gaming regulators say violating a federal law could do exactly that.

Members of the commission also worry the federal government may take a stronger interest in Nevada’s gaming industry if the state appears unconcerned about cannabis use.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Torontonians Love Their Dispensaries. Why Is Mayor Tory Dead Set Against Them?

When a cannabis consulting firm determined Toronto had taken over from Vancouver as the Canadian city with the most marijuana dispensaries, the firm’s owner was excited. “In the next month or two, we might have as many dispensaries as Pizza Pizzas in Toronto,” Harrison Jordan said, referring to the ubiquitous fast food restaurants.

Not everyone in Toronto shares his enthusiasm about marijuana dispensaries but a lot of residents are perfectly fine with them. In fact, research indicates many people in Ontario would now like to see recreational marijuana sold in dispensaries when it becomes legal next year.

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In a Forum Research survey conducted in April 2016, 52% of Ontario respondents said they thought that dedicated cannabis dispensaries would be the best place to sell recreational marijuana after legalization. In a survey conducted by Nanos Research just last month, 55% of Ontario residents said they would prefer that marijuana be sold by such licensed private retailers rather than province-run liquor stores.

52% of Ontario survey respondents say dedicated cannabis dispensaries are the best place to sell recreational marijuana. But Toronto Mayor Tory has not wavered.

Despite such findings, Toronto Mayor John Tory has not wavered from the hardline stance he took against dispensaries when he took office almost three years ago.

The same week the Nanos survey results were released, Tory sent an open letter to Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne stating his opposition to dispensaries in many parts of the city. “I have made it clear that while I support the legalization of marijuana, I do not think the people of Toronto would support the future widespread location of outlets for the sale of marijuana in residential neighborhoods or in certain retail areas,” said Tory.

In June, two months after the federal government confirmed its intention to legalize recreational marijuana in July 2018, Tory said he would like to see dispensary raids continue in Toronto.

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Why does the mayor remain steadfast in his opposition to dispensaries while so many Ontarians have indicated they want cannabis available through such private retailers once recreational use becomes legal? The answer depends on whom you ask.

Tory’s defense of his position is heavy on vagaries and hearsay. He says he’s concerned that dispensaries might not “fit within [Toronto’s] communities” and that he’s worried about the well-being of children. At a press conference in June, Tory said residents of one Toronto neighbourhood had told him that people were being harassed at ATMs by others looking for money to buy marijuana at a nearby dispensary.

But the mayor’s critics see other factors at play.

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Lisa Campbell, spokesperson for the Cannabis Friendly Business Association, attributes Tory’s criticism of dispensaries to his desire to “play nice” with Wynne, who has expressed interest in having recreational cannabis sold at province-controlled liquor stores.

In recent months, Tory has asked the Wynne government to agree to an arrangement in which Toronto will share tax revenue generated by legal marijuana sales. He has also asked the province for more money to maintain Toronto’s massive transit system, two busiest expressways and public housing—so it’s in his best interest to be on good terms with the Premier, says Campbell. “He’s doing a great job of being friendly with other levels of government,” she adds.

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Like other Tory detractors, Campbell also attributes the mayor’s stand against dispensaries, in part, to a cozy relationship with “big money” entities that would prefer different sales models. The first of those are the licensed producers that now sell medical cannabis directly to Canadians and are poised to do the same with recreational marijuana once it’s legal. The second such entity is the wealthy family, the Westons, that owns Canada’s biggest pharmacy chain, Shoppers Drug Mart, and would like medical and, possibly, recreational marijuana to be sold there.

Campbell and other critics note that Tory himself comes from the Canadian establishment. His great-grandfather founded Sun Life of Canada, a big financial services company, and his father helped build one of Canada’s most influential and politically connected law firms, Torys LLP.

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While Tory’s motivation for opposing dispensaries is a matter of debate, one fact is not: With the legalization date less than a year away, the mayor of Toronto is at odds with many of his constituents about where recreational marijuana should be sold, making the future of cannabis in Canada’s biggest city a little hazy.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Opposites Attract: Roger Stone, John Morgan Team Up in Cannabis Coalition

Two months ago Roger Stone, the longtime political advisor to President Trump, revealed that he was forming a new bipartisan coalition to defend state marijuana legalization laws. Earlier this week Stone, along with prominent Florida attorney John Morgan, offered more complete details about the makeup of that group, the United States Cannabis Coalition.

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The USCC was created by the two men basically on the complete opposite side of politics from one another, to persuade federal decision makers—including the president—to support each states’ right to create its own cannabis laws.

Courtesy of the United States Cannabis Coalition.

Both Morgan and Stone have been longtime advocates for cannabis legalization. Morgan, who founded one of the country’s largest personal injury law firms, was largely responsible for bringing medical marijuana to Florida. Stone has been advocating for legalization throughout his political career.

The main goal of the group, according to its press release, is to urge President Trump to honor the pledge that he made several times during the 2016 campaign, that he would support each states’ authority to legalize the possession and sales of cannabis.

“I am highly confident that Donald Trump will protect the access of millions of Americans including our veterans who are currently using cannabis for medicinal purposes” said Stone, who has been a formal and informal advisor to Trump for more than 40 years. “I am confident the President will keep his pledge.”

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According to the group, the coalition will also urge the President to change the classification of cannabis from a Schedule 1 drug.

“All Americans can and should come together to stop the war on marijuana. It can no longer be a Schedule 1 narcotic. Pain, disease, and mental illness don’t pick political parties – just people. This is the perfect issue for ‘strange bedfellows’ to come together on and WIN,” said Morgan.

There are people from all political parties in the coalition: Democrats and Republicans, liberals, conservatives, libertarians, moderates, and progressives.

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Derrick Kitts, the former producer of NBC’s Morning Joe news show will serve as the Senior Consultant to the coalition, while the Executive Director will be Ryan Criscuolol of Denver.

In the coalition’s press release, Stone noted that Sessions had written Congress requesting authority to wage a crackdown on medicinal cannabis, while others in the White House have murmured that a crackdown could be coming.

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“Attorney General Eric Holder’s directive on the subject chose to respect states’ rights.  Unbelievably, now Sessions and Kelly, egged on by the likes of Governor Chris Christie and the new FBI Director, want to void the Holder directive, revive the war on drugs, and prosecute those who are making legal medicinal marijuana available even though their boss has indicated that he doesn’t share their draconian views on the subject,” Morgan said in a statement.

The following members will also be joining Stone and Morgan on the USCC advisory board:

  • Fox News Legal Analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano
  • WBAI radio commentator and Democratic US Senate candidate Randy Credico
  • Senator Jeff Brandes (R-St. Petersburg)
  • Omar Navarro, Republican Candidate for Congress 43rd District – CA
  • Norm Kent, Chairman of the National Organization for Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML)
  • Congressman Matt Gaetz R- FL
  • NY State Senator Diane Savino (D-Bronx)
  • Christian Josi, Former Executive Director of the American Conservative Union
  • Assemblyman Ron Castorina, Chairman of the Staten Island Republican Committee
  • Jeff Doctor, Director of the National Indian Cannabis Coalition
  • Jim Gray, former California Superior Court Judge and 2012 Libertarian Party candidate for Vice President
  • Elizabeth Everett, of Texans for Trump
  • Deroy Murdock, a longtime columnist and activist
  • Pastor Mark Burns, of Easley, SC
  • CATO Institute Scholar Doug Bandow
  • Missouri State Rep. Shamed Dogan
  • Curtis Sliwa, Guardian Angels Founder and Chairman of The New York State Reform Party
  • Gary Wiegert of the St. Louis Police Department
  • Arizona State Rep. Ethan Orr (R-Tucson)


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

7 Tips for Making the Most of Seattle Hempfest

Being a free-of-charge cannabis festival held in a glorious outdoor locale, Seattle Hempfest is easy to enjoy. But here are a few strategic tips for making the most of it.

The post 7 Tips for Making the Most of Seattle Hempfest appeared first on Leafly.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Ontario Report Urges Immediate Decriminalization and Many Other Things

One of the many distinctive (and divisive) features of the Cannabis Act—which proposes to legalize adult-use recreational cannabis across Canada in July 2018—is how it leaves the specifics of cannabis distribution, possession, and purchase up to the individual provinces.

This week, Ontario took a step toward creating its own regs with the release of “Cannabis Legalization and Regulation,” a report by the Ontario division of the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA). The report provides provincial officials with “wide-ranging recommendations to reduce the health risks and harms associated with the legalization and regulation of cannabis.”

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The most notable of those recommendations: immediate decriminalization. “Given the plans for legalization of cannabis in 2018,” the report states, “decriminalization of cannabis for simple possession for the general population should be considered immediately in the coming months prior to legalization.”

That policy advice came in the report’s “Focus on Health Equity” section, which also includes this observation: “Currently, there are systemic inequalities leading to the criminalization of marginalized groups for cannabis possession, which account for thousands of arrests and convictions every year. Arrests for cannabis possession continue to take place, often disproportionately impacting marginalized communities across the country.”

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Other recommendations range from revenue mandates (the CMHA urges allocating 100 percent of cannabis-related revenue to mental health and addictions services) to the minimum age for cannabis purchase, which the CMHA would like to align with the Ontario’s legal age for purchasing alcohol (19). A few notable passages from the 5,000-word document:

* The “Regulating Sales” section puts forth an impressively intricate recipe for doing so, from restricting advertising to the same cartoon- and endorsement-free zone occupied by tobacco marketers, to ensuring “appropriate and reasonable pricing to deter consumers from purchasing cannabis through illegal means.” The CMHA would also have cannabis distributors earn the title: “Distribution of cannabis should include the provision of cannabis education to patrons through the implementation of a Cannabis Card program, similar to Ontario’s Smart Serve program.”

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* In the “Road Safety” section, things get strict, with the CMHA urging a zero-tolerance policy for cannabis consumption in any motorized vehicle. “A zero-tolerance policy would include both the driver of the motorized vehicle, as well as any passengers in the car,” reads the report. “It is important that a clear message be sent to the public as soon as possible regarding zero tolerance for impaired driving due to cannabis use.”

* Tagged onto the section addressing the Minimum Age for Purchase is this bracing proposition: “The Government of Ontario should advocate with the Federal Government to remove criminalization for simple possession of cannabis, especially for youth. CMHA recommends further research into a model similar to the Portugal’s decriminalization policy for young people that would allow for social services, counseling and education instead of criminal sanctions for underage cannabis possession.”

Read the full CMHA Ontario report here.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

How to Change a Local Cannabis Law

As American citizens, we are bestowed with the opportunity to participate in the law-making process. It may seem daunting, but getting involved in helping create, pass, and support legislation at a local level is not as difficult as it might seem.

Watching politics stall at a federal level can be incredibly frustrating and could make even the most patriotic citizen feel disheartened in the convoluted and often sluggish political process. But if you get involved at a local level, you are far more likely to enact change that will impact you and your community on a much intimate scale.

Here are ways you can make a difference and work to either introduce a local cannabis law or get an existing law changed.

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1. Identify Your Issue

In this case, the issue that concerns you is probably cannabis-related, but there are plenty of other reasons to get involved in local politics. Concerned about transportation? City council members? Police accountability? These are all great motivations to get involved in your local political scene. Whatever your cause, take that passion with you all the way through this journey.

One local issue that’s often overlooked is that of cannabis decriminalization. This can be accomplished at a state, city, or county level, but be careful not to allow your law to supercede the state law, as was the case when Nashville, Tennessee tried to decriminalize in 2016, leading to the law being overturned. Decriminalization is a huge and important step, and many states are behind the times with this one. Even in many states where medical marijuana is legal, you can still face arrest and jail time for the possession of even small amounts of cannabis.

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2. Do Your Research

It’s all too easy to complain about an issue, especially when it directly affects you, but sometimes it’s worth doing a little digging on the legislative history of this particular topic. What other relevant changes have been enacted in the past? Is this the first or 50th rendition of the policy? Has it changed many times? Did it used to be better? Worse? How was it drafted and decided? If it was decided with a city council vote, for instance, it will probably be decided by a city council vote again.

You may find that the root of the issue stems from a completely different cause and requires a completely different approach to the problem than originally anticipated. Once you’ve pinpointed the heart of the issue, you can begin to address it.

A relevant example is Georgia’s cannabis oil registry. Georgia passed a law in 2014 allowing the use and possession of cannabis oil for medical reasons, but the law was vague. In 2016, Georgia Rep. Allen Peake (R-Macon) introduced a new bill to expand the program and outline clear rules, which passed and was signed into law.

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3. Find Allies

This is where you’ve got to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get out there. This may an especially daunting task for introverts, so consider encouraging your friends to get active on the political scene, too. Go to local city council meetings, attend meetings for public input on your preferred issue, take notes, and write letters to your representative or preferred candidate and ask for their support on this issue.

You may discover an entire group of concerned citizens like yourself who has worked to change the law in the past and may support your efforts to improve the law. These groups may also be likely to know which local politicians are more sensitive than others to your cause.

If you’re not sure where to start, try reaching out to local chapters associated with national groups, like NORML (the National Organization of Reform for Marijuana Laws) and Americans for Safe Access (ASA). There are also local groups in less cannabis-friendly states, such as New Approach Missouri, New Approach South Dakota, New Approach Idaho, etc. Reach out to the coordinators and find out the best way to get involved and make an impact.

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4. If Possible, File an Initiative or Referendum

This is not always a possibility and you’ll have to do some research on the inner workings of your own local government, but if you have the opportunity, make a draft of the most important subtopics related to your issue. Drafting legislation is not easy, so consider enlisting an attorney or city council member to help draft it and support it. You may also want to work with a local community group that supports the issue to help draft an initiative to enact the change you wish to see.

If you’re already involved in local politics, you may already know which lawmakers are more cannabis-friendly and, therefore, more likely to help you in your quest. If you don’t, however, pick up a voter’s pamphlet, visit a few city council member websites, and do some light reading on who might be the best person to approach to support your cause. Additionally, if you get involved with local advocacy groups, they may already know which officials are most likely to lend an ear.

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5. Rally Your Community

This may mean testifying at council meetings, contacting local groups, and even gathering signatures on the street. However you get the word out, it’s crucial that you garner enough support within the community and local government leaders to help pass your initiative.

When it comes to cannabis, a broad range of citizens from varying demographics often support measures related to decriminalization and legalization, and showing that your ordinance has a diverse group of people supporting it will signal to elected officials that this issue is important to a significant portion of the community (and they’ll be more likely to throw their weight behind your efforts, too).

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6. Know Your Counterarguments

When it comes to any major issue, no matter where you stand, there will always be opposition and a point to your counterpoint. Prepare yourself to answer any questions that may arise, and keep research and statistics handy so you have knowledge to back up your proposal.

What are the possible counterarguments that people may try to use against you? Practice speaking in favor of your proposal and anticipate detractors—not only will this help you firm up your own personal reasons for supporting this ordinance, it’s great for your public speaking skills (and it might give you a little boost of confidence, too).

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7. Get Loud

Get the word out about your proposed policy change in any way you can. Speak out at community meetings, and schedule a meeting with the editorial board of a local newspaper to ask if they would be willing to publish an op-ed. Contact other media outlets, including local radio and television stations, and let them know about your efforts. Tell every registered voter you’ve ever met in your life just how important this issue is to you and why.

One of the most commonly discussed topics when it comes to cannabis legalization is the story of Charlotte Figi, the little girl who was able to treat her seizures with a specialized high-CBD strain named for her. This story, which aired on CNN in 2013, has inspired laws across the United States, even in Southern and Midwestern states that would never normally give cannabis legislation a chance at a hearing, let alone sign it into law.

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8. Be Patient

The good news is that policy changes at a local level move much faster than at a federal level. The bad news is that it’s still not very fast. It can take months for your initiative to get approved, and getting it in front of voters or considered by local politicians may also take some hard-earned connections within the community.

Be patient, be persistent, and be indefatigable. Do not lose hope if you don’t succeed on your first go-around. Take it as a learning experience, and keep moving forward. Personal experiences and anecdotes are often the reason a voter or politician is moved to vote in favor of an issue, so keep sharing your story and why this issue is important to you.

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Arkansas is a great example of when perseverance and determination came out on top. The state has had several different cannabis advocates introducing both medical and adult-use measures over the past five years, but the Arkansas Attorney General rejected each measure, again and again, on the basis that the proposal’s language was unclear.

Advocates were tireless, however—after seven rejections, Little Rock attorney David Couch was able to secure a spot on the ballot with Issue 6 to legalize medical marijuana, which was passed by the voters and enacted into law in 2017. Never underestimate the power of perseverance!

9. Don’t Give Up

Fall down once, get up twice. No matter how many times you may feel like giving up, don’t! If this issue is truly important to you and is something you truly and passionately believe in, it’s worth the time and effort to make this policy change stick. Be willing to compromise, especially if you hear a particularly compelling argument from the opposition. If at first you don’t succeed, re-group, re-organize, and get ready to fight for what you believe in.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Maui’s Newly Opened Medical Marijuana Dispensary to Close Temporarily

WAILUKU, Hawaii (AP) — Less than a week after it opened, Maui’s first state-licensed medical marijuana dispensary is reworking its opening hours as demand for its product outstrips supply because of a backlog.

Maui Grown Therapies says it had expected its most recent batch of flowers to clear state lab certification by Saturday, but that didn’t happen, The Maui News reported. Company officials said it sold out its first batch of certified flowers Saturday.

Maui Grown Therapies opened for business Tuesday. Company officials say the dispensary could only sell flowers — resulting in depleted flower stocks on Maui and “disappointed patients.”

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The company said it needs the Department of Health’s State Labs Division “to help unclog a backlog of products so Maui patients can have access to quality-assured medicinal cannabis products.”

It will be closed Monday and Tuesday and reopen at noon Wednesday, when it will sell to patients who make appointments through its website.

“It’s unfortunate that an administrative hindrance of this magnitude prevents patients from getting the help they need,” said Christopher Cole, director of product management for Maui Grown Therapies. “We had planned to open with a full range of derivative products such as concentrates, oils, capsules and topical products, but at the eleventh hour we discovered that the State Labs Division had failed to certify a lab to conduct testing of manufactured products.”

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State offices were closed Saturday, and state Health Department officials could not be reached for comment.

“We could serve thousands of patients with the amount of manufactured product we currently have available for final compliance testing,” Cole said. “Even though we were approved by the Department of Health on May 24 to manufacture cannabis products, the restrictions placed on the state’s only licensed lab have prevented us from offering these products to our patients — and it is entirely unclear to us when this will change.”

The dispensary’s initial posted hours were 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Dispensary hours have been changed to noon to 6 p.m. until further notice.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Cannabis States Try to Curb Smuggling, Fend off Administration

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Well before Oregon legalized marijuana, its verdant, wet forests made it an ideal place for growing the drug, which often ended up being funneled out of the state for big money. Now, officials suspect cannabis grown legally in Oregon and other states is also being smuggled out, and the trafficking is putting America’s multibillion-dollar marijuana industry at risk.

In response, pot-legal states are trying to clamp down on “diversion” even as U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions presses for enforcement of federal laws against marijuana.

Tracking legal cannabis from the fields and greenhouses where it’s grown to the shops where it’s sold under names like Blueberry Kush and Chernobyl is their so far main protective measure.

In Oregon, Gov. Kate Brown recently signed into law a requirement that state regulators track from seed to store all marijuana grown for sale in Oregon’s legal market. So far, only recreational marijuana has been comprehensively tracked. Tina Kotek, speaker of the Oregon House, said lawmakers wanted to ensure “we’re protecting the new industry that we’re supporting here.”

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“There was a real recognition that things could be changing in D.C.,” she said.

The Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board says it’s replacing its current tracking Nov. 1 with a “highly secure, reliable, scalable and flexible system.”

California voters approved using a tracking system run by Lakeland, Florida-based Franwell for its recreational cannabis market. Sales become legal Jan. 1.

Franwell also tracks marijuana, using bar-code and radio frequency identification labels on packaging and plants, in Colorado, Oregon, Maryland, Alaska and Michigan.

“The tracking system is the most important tool a state has,” said Michael Crabtree, who runs Denver-based Nationwide Compliance Specialists Inc., which helps tax collectors track elusive, cash-heavy industries like the marijuana business.

But the systems aren’t fool-proof. They rely on the users’ honesty, he said.

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“We have seen numerous examples of people ‘forgetting’ to tag plants,” Crabtree said. Colorado’s tracking also doesn’t apply to home-grown plants and many noncommercial marijuana caregivers.

In California, implementing a “fully operational, legal market” could take years, said state Sen. Mike McGuire, who represents the “Emerald Triangle” region that’s estimated to produce 60 percent of America’s marijuana. But he’s confident tracking will help.

“In the first 24 months, we’re going to have a good idea who is in the regulated market and who is in black market,” McGuire said.

Oregon was the first state to decriminalize personal possession, in 1973. It legalized medical marijuana in 1998, and recreational use in 2014.

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Before that, Anthony Taylor hid his large cannabis crop from aerial surveillance under a forest canopy east of Portland, and tended it when there was barely enough light to see.

“In those days, marijuana was REALLY illegal,” said Taylor, now a licensed marijuana processor and lobbyist. “If you got caught growing the amounts we were growing, you were going to go to prison for a number of years.”

Taylor believes it’s easier to grow illegally now because authorities lack the resources to sniff out every operation. And growers who sell outside the state can earn thousands of dollars per pound, he said.

Still, it’s hard to say if cannabis smuggling has gotten worse in Oregon, or how much of the marijuana leaving the state filters out from the legal side.

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Chris Gibson, executive director of the federally funded Oregon-Idaho High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area program, said the distinction matters less than the fact that marijuana continues to leave Oregon on planes, trains and automobiles, and through the mail.

“None is supposed to leave, so it’s an issue,” Gibson told The Associated Press. “That should be a primary concern to state leadership.”

“Marijuana has left Oregon for decades. What’s different is that now we have better mechanisms to try to control it.”

US Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR)

On a recent morning, Billy Williams, the U.S. attorney in Oregon, sat at his desk in his office overlooking downtown Portland, a draft Oregon State Police report in front of him. Oregon produces between 132 tons (120 metric tons) and 900 tons (816 metric tons) more marijuana than what Oregonians can conceivably consume, the report said, using statistics from the legal industry and estimates of illicit grows. It identified Oregon as an “epicenter of cannabis production” and quoted an academic as saying three to five times the amount of cannabis that’s consumed in Oregon leaves the state.

Sessions himself cited the report in a July 24 letter to Oregon’s governor. In it, Sessions asked Brown to explain how Oregon would address the report’s “serious findings.”

Pete Gendron, a licensed marijuana grower who advised state regulators on compliance and enforcement, said the reports’ numbers are guesswork, and furthermore are outdated because they don’t take into account the marijuana now being sold in Oregon’s legal recreational market.

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A U.S. Justice Department task force recently said the Cole Memorandum , which restricts federal marijuana law enforcement in states where marijuana is legal, should be reevaluated to see if it should be changed.

The governors of Oregon, Colorado, Washington and Alaska — where both medical and recreational marijuana are legal — wrote to Sessions and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin in April, warning altering the memorandum “would divert existing marijuana product into the black market and increase dangerous activity in both our states and our neighboring states.”

But less than a month later, Sessions wrote to congressional leaders criticizing the federal government’s hands-off approach to medical marijuana, and citing a Colorado case in which a medical marijuana licensee shipped cannabis out of state.

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In his letter, Sessions opposed an amendment by Oregon Democratic Rep. Earl Blumenauer and California Republican Rep. Dana Rohrabacher that prevents the Justice Department from interfering with states’ medical marijuana. Congress is weighing renewing the amendment for the next fiscal year.

In a phone interview from Washington, Blumenauer said the attorney general is “out of step” with most members of Congress, who have become more supportive “of ending the failed prohibition on marijuana.”

“Marijuana has left Oregon for decades,” Blumenauer said. “What’s different is that now we have better mechanisms to try to control it.”

Taylor believes cannabis smuggling will continue because of the profit incentive, which will end only if the drug is legalized across America. U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, a New Jersey Democrat, introduced a bill in Congress on Aug. 1 to do just that.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Utah Initiative for Medical Cannabis Moves to Signature Drive

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Medical marijuana backers are moving forward with a ballot initiative to ask Utah voters directly to pass a broad medical marijuana law next year.

The Utah Patients Coalition got state approval Thursday to start collecting the 113,143 voter signatures for the ballot initiative in November 2018. The group has until April 15 to collect the signatures.

Coalition members say they’re done waiting for lawmakers who rejected proposals to pass a broad medical cannabis law three years in a row.

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Utah Lawmakers Turn Timid on Medical Marijuana Plans

The coalition wants Utah to join 29 other states that allow marijuana to be dispensed and used as a treatment.

The proposed initiative would set up state-regulated growing and dispensing of marijuana for use by residents with about a dozen types of conditions, including cancer and post-traumatic stress disorder.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Herbal Cannabis Sales Still Dominate the Retail Marijuana Market

SANTA MONICA, CA — Herbal cannabis is far more popular among consumers than are plant-derived edibles or extracts, according to an analysis of retail sales data in Washington state.

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh and from the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica reviewed data from over 36 million separate retail cannabis transactions in Washington.

Sales occurred from July 2014 to September 2016.

Authors reported that “traditional cannabis flowers still account for the majority of spending (66.6 percent), though they acknowledged that sales of plant-derived extracts have increased significantly over the past two years.

Researchers also reported that prices on cannabis-related products fell sharply in the months following legalization “as new retailers entered the market and production expanded.”

Full text of the study, “Variation in cannabis potency and prices in a newly legal market: Evidence from 30 million cannabis sales in Washington state,” appears in Addiction.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.