Tag: Medical Marijuana Bills

Bipartisan Vote Carries Medical Marijuana Research Bill to Passage in New Mexico House

SANTA FE, NM — The New Mexico State House voted 41-26 Saturday afternoon to pass House Bill 155, co-sponsored by Rep. D. Armstrong (D-Albuquerque) and Rep. McCamley (D-Las Cruces) to establish a fund in the state treasury for research related to the production, uses, effects, and efficacy of medical marijuana.

The bill had bi-partisan support with six Republicans voting in favor, including the minority leader, Nate Gentry, R-Abq. Other Republicans who voted in favor of medical cannabis research were David Adkins, Jim Dines, Sarah Maestas-Barnes, and Monica Youngblood from Albuqurque, and Gail Armstrong, Magdalena.

The bill also establishes protections from state level prosecution and criminal liability for researchers, similar to protections that already exist for medical cannabis patients, producers and medical providers. The proposed legislation does not create an appropriation or cost the state money, but creates a placeholder fund that the legislature or Dept. of Health could choose to direct funds toward in the future. The fund could also collect income from grants, donations, etc..

“This bill would allow researchers like Siv Watkins, a Biology Professor at NM Tech, to conduct university approved studies without fear of criminal or civil liability,” said Representative Armstrong. “This researcher already has a university approved study ready to go. They even have private funding. But, until and unless this bill passes and is signed into law, Professor Watkins and others aren’t protected from prosecution, even at the state level.”

New Mexico’s original medical marijuana bill, the Lynn Pierson Controlled Substances Research and Therapeutic Act, created a program at UNM that distributed marijuana to New Mexicans sick with cancer.

“If we want to learn more about the effects of marijuana, it is critical to ensure that academic researchers have the same level of protection from liability that is already extended to state licensed patients, producers and medical practitioners,” said Jessica Gelay, New Mexico Policy Coordinator with the Drug Policy Alliance. “It was great to see that Representatives from both sides of the aisle voted for this measure. The only way to get more data on effects of marijuana is to support well-designed research, which is what this bill sets up a framework to do.”

More than 32,000 New Mexicans are qualified to participate in the state’s Medical Cannabis Program, which is administered by the Department of Health (DOH). Patients are certified by a medical practitioner to have one of 21 serious medical conditions and must register with DOH in order to become a qualified patient.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Arkansas Governor Signs Law Delaying Enactment of Voter-Approved Medical Marijuana Initiative

Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson (arkansas.gov)

LITTLE ROCK, AR — Lawmakers passed legislation this week to delay the enactment of the state’s voter-initiated medical cannabis program.

The bill was signed into law Monday by Republican Governor Asa Hutchinson

House Bill 1026, now Act 4, postpones the implementation of the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Amendment by 60 days.

Under the new timeline, regulators have until July 1, 2017 to begin accepting applications from those seeking a state license to grow or dispense medical cannabis.

Fifty-three percent of voters decided in favor of the Amendment on Election Day.

Because the legislation amends a constitutional amendment, it required the votes of over two-thirds of state lawmakers.

Lawmakers in several states, including Florida, Maine, Massachusetts, and North Dakota, are pushing forward similar legislative efforts to either significantly delay or amend voter-approved marijuana initiatives.

NORML Executive Director Erik Altieri expressed strong criticism toward these proposed changes and delays, stating: “Voters have lived with the failings of marijuana prohibition for far too long already. Lawmakers have a responsibility to abide by the will of the voters and to do so in a timely manner.”

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Florida Health Regulators’ Proposed Medical Marijuana Rules Undercut Voter-Approved Amendment

Florida Health Regulators’ Proposed Medical Marijuana Rules Undercut Voter-Approved Amendment | NORML

TALLAHASSEE, FL — Proposed rules by the Florida Department of Health to regulate the dispensing of medical cannabis are contrary to the intent of Amendment 2, the ballot initiative approved by 71 percent of voters on Election Day. Specifically, the draft rules would not permit physicians to recommend cannabis therapy to patients with chronic pain – […]

Florida Health Regulators’ Proposed Medical Marijuana Rules Undercut Voter-Approved Amendment | The Daily Chronic


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Lawmakers Try to Delay Enactment of Voter Approved Marijuana Laws

Lawmakers Try to Delay Enactment of Voter Approved Marijuana Laws | Paul Armentano

Legislators in a number of states are pushing forward measures to delay the enactment of several voter-initiated marijuana laws. In Arkansas, House lawmakers are moving forward with legislation, House Bill 1026, to postpone the deadline for establishing the state’s new medical marijuana program by 60 days. Fifty-three percent of voters approved Issue 6 on Election […]

Lawmakers Try to Delay Enactment of Voter Approved Marijuana Laws | The Daily Chronic


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

North Dakota Bill Would Delay Medical Marijuana Implementation

North Dakota was one of four states to authorize medical marijuana during the November elections, when over 63% of voters approved Question 5.

Now, a bill introduced in the state legislature seeks to delay the law’s implementation.

Senate Bill 2154 would prevent the state department of health from issuing any applications or licenses for medical marijuana dispensaries until July.

Read the full story at Medical Jane.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

North Dakota Senate Unanimously Approves Medical Marijuana Delay

North Dakota Senate Unanimously Approves Medical Marijuana Delay | Scott Gacek

Lawmakers in the North Dakota Senate voted 45-0 on Tuesday to approve a measure that will delay the implementation of a voter-approved law to legalize medical marijuana in the state. North Dakota was one of four states to authorize medical marijuana during the November elections, when over 63% of voters approved Question 5. Senate Bill 2154 would prevent the state […]

North Dakota Senate Unanimously Approves Medical Marijuana Delay | The Daily Chronic


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

New Mexico Bill Would Expand Medical Marijuana Program

New Mexico Bill Would Expand Medical Marijuana Program | NORML

Legislation is pending, Senate Bill 8, to amend the state’s medical cannabis program in a manner that would better serve patients’ needs. Specifically, the measure would amend patient possession limits so that qualified persons may possess up to five ounces of herbal cannabis per month, and it would mandate the Health Department to issue identification […]

New Mexico Bill Would Expand Medical Marijuana Program | The Daily Chronic


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Comprehensive Medical Marijuana Bill Coming to South Carolina

COLUMBIA, SC — A bipartisan group of state lawmakers are introducing comprehensive medical cannabis legislation Tuesday in both chambers of the South Carolina General Assembly.

The South Carolina Compassionate Care Act will allow patients suffering from debilitating medical conditions to access medical cannabis if their doctors recommend it.

“This legislation will establish a comprehensive and tightly regulated medical cannabis program,” said Sen. Tom Davis, (R-Beaufort), the bill’s lead sponsor in the Senate. “It will ensure seriously ill patients are able to access this medicine safely and legally if their doctors believe it will help them. South Carolinians suffering from debilitating conditions deserve the same chance at relief as the roughly 200 million Americans living in states that have adopted similar laws.”

Under the proposed law, the Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) would license and regulate a limited number of qualified medical cannabis cultivation centers, processing facilities, independent testing laboratories, and dispensaries.

It would issue registration cards to patients with qualifying medical conditions who have received written recommendations from their physicians, allowing them to purchase a limited amount of medical cannabis from a licensed dispensary.

Similar laws have been adopted in 28 states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. territories of Guam and Puerto Rico.

“This legislation is about helping people who are in need, who are suffering, and who are in pain,” said Rep. Peter McCoy (R-Charleston), the bill’s lead sponsor in the House. “There are so many circumstances in which medical marijuana can provide substantial help to families and friends in South Carolina. I’m hopeful that with the filing of this bill we can raise awareness and move the ball forward when it comes to treating South Carolina citizens with epilepsy, PTSD, cancer, and many other debilitating conditions.”

In 2014, South Carolina adopted a law that allows patients with severe forms of epilepsy to use preparations of cannabis that contain high levels of CBD and very low levels of THC. It does not cover a variety of other debilitating conditions for which medical cannabis can be efficacious, and it does not provide for a regulated supply of CBD products.

Some epilepsy patients also report that a greater ratio of THC to CBD is necessary for it to be effective in reducing the frequency and severity of seizures.

“My daughter has run out of traditional treatment options and medical cannabis could help her,” said SC Compassion President Jill Swing of Charleston, whose 9-year-old daughter, Mary Louise, has cerebral palsy and epilepsy. “She has experienced some benefits from CBD oil, but whole-plant treatments are far more effective at controlling her seizures. This legislation would truly improve her quality of life.”

More than three out of four South Carolina residents (78%) think cannabis should be made legal for medical use, according to a September 2016 Winthrop Poll commissioned by The State newspaper. Only about one in six South Carolinians (16%) think it should remain illegal.

“We are tired of seeing loved ones suffer, families torn apart, and lives destroyed by our state’s current cannabis policy,” Swing said. “Seriously ill South Carolinians should not have to break the law or move to another state to access this medically beneficial and often life-saving plant. We are thankful that compassionate lawmakers have heard our pleas for help and responded with this commonsense legislation.”

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Recreational, Medical Marijuana Legislation Expected in Wisconsin

MADISON, WI — When lawmakers in Wisconsin convene next week for the start of the 2017-2018 Biennium, expect to see legislation introduced to legalize marijuana.

According to the Washington, DC-based Marijuana Policy Project, State Rep. Melissa Sargent “plans to reintroduce legislation that would end Wisconsin’s criminalization of adult marijuana consumers in exchange for taxing and regulating it like alcohol.”

The proposal would also allow medical marijuana access for seriously ill residents, including adults and minors.

Sargent introduced a similar proposal in 2015, which would have allowed Wisconsin residents 21 or older to legally possess up to half an ounce of marijuana. Out of state residents would have been limited to a quarter ounce of pot under the proposal.

Sargent’s proposed 2015 bill would have established a system of state regulated marijuana retail outlets, with retail marijuana sales subject to a special 25% sales tax.

Wisconsin’s 2017-18 legislative session begins January 11.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Two Medical Marijuana Bills Introduced in Missouri

Two lawmakers in Missouri have filed proposals for the upcoming 2017 legislation to legalize medical marijuana and create a comprehensive statewide medical cannabis program.

The two bills, Senate Bill 56, sponsored by Jason Holsman (D-Kansas City), and Senate Bill 153, sponsored by Rob Schaaf (R-St. Joseph), were pre-filed earlier this month.  With Republicans holding a super-majority in the state Senate, SB 153 could have the upper hand, however.

Passage of either of these bills could finally bring a true medical marijuana program to Missouri. In 2014, Missouri lawmakers passed a limited medical marijuana bill to allow some patients with intractable epilepsy access to products containing marijuana extracts with THC amounts below 0.3%.

Voters in Missouri narrowly missed out on a chance to vote on a comprehensive medical marijuana bill in the November elections when thousands of signatures collected by proponents were invalidated in court, leaving the measure off the ballot.  Polling results released in June found that 62% of Missouri voters supported the referendum, with only 27% opposed, making it highly likely that it would have been approved by voters had they gotten the chance to do so.   Senate Bill 56 is very similar to the proposal that would have appeared on the November ballot.

Here’s a look at the details of the two proposals filed in advance of the 2017 Regular Session, which starts on January 4, and ends May 30.

Senate Bill 56

Holsman’s SB 56 would allow the state’s Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) to “grant licenses for the cultivation, manufacture, distribution, and sale of marijuana for medical use.”  The department would be responsible for overseeing the medical marijuana program.

Under SB 56, retail sales of medical marijuana would be subject to a four percent tax, which would used to pay for the administration of the medical marijuana program. Any surplus revenue from collected taxes would go to the Missouri Veterans Commission to be used for health and care services for military veterans.

The bill would establish a statewide medical marijuana program, including licenced cultivators, processors and dispensaries.  For patients purchasing marijuana at dispensaries, DHSS would be authorized to set a limit on how much marijuana is purchased in a thirty day period, but that limit can not be less than six ounces, according to the bill.  In addition, any patient needing to purchase more marijuana than is allowed by state rules would be able to do so with recommendations from two physicians.

In addition to buying medical marijuana from dispensaries, patients and caregivers would be allowed to grow up to six flowering cannabis plants and maintain a 90-day supply of marijuana.  Again, two doctors can override the 90-day supply limit if necessary for the patient’s needs.

Unlike many medical marijuana bills introduced in the conservative southern states, Senate Bill 56 allows for medical marijuana use for a broad spectrum of ailments, giving physicians latitude when deciding if cannabis therapy is a viable treatment.

Qualifying medical conditions for medical marijuana would include cancer, epilepsy, glaucoma, intractable migraines unresponsive to other treatments, chronic medical conditions that cause sevre muscle spasms (including multiple sclerosis, seizures, Parkinson’s disease, and Tourette’s syndrome), debilitating psychiatric disorders including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), HIV/AIDS, any terminal illness, or any “chronic, debilitating, or otherwise equivalent condition, including but not limited to hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, agitation of Alzheimer’s disease, cachexia, and wasting syndrome.”

In addition, any chronic medical condition that is treated with a prescription medication that “could lead to physical or psychological dependence” would also qualify for medical marijuana if the patient’s doctor determines that medical marijuana could be effective in treating the condition as a safer alternative to pharmaceuticals.

Minors under the age of 18 would be allowed into the medical marijuana program with the recommendation of their physician and parental consent, but would not be allowed to purchase medical marijuana on their own. Only their parents or legal guardians would be allowed to purchase their medicine.

The bill also provides specific protections for organ transplant patients, who would not be allowed to be denied a transplant because of their status as a medical marijuana patient.

Unlike recently enacted medical marijuana laws in Minnesota, New York and Pennsylvania, SB 56 does not ban patients from smoking marijuana.

The full text of Senate Bill 56 can be found here.

Senate Bill 153

Schaaf’s SB 153 is an identical refiling of last year’s Senate Bill 912 and House Bill 2625, neither of which received a hearing or vote.

Under the proposal, qualifying patients would be allowed to possess a 30-day supply of medical marijuana, as determined by their doctor.

Qualifying conditions would include cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, severe migraines, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis,  damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord with objective neurological indication of intractable spasticity, epilepsy, inflammatory bowel disease, neuropathies, Huntington’s disease, cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe or chronic pain; severe nausea, seizures, and severe or persistent muscle spasms.

SB 153 does not specifically ban smoking or access to cannabis flowers, but it requires physicians to determine delivery and consumption methods for their patients.   Doctors recommending medical marijuana to their patients would need to include in the certification “the form of medical marijuana the patient should consume, including the method of consumption and any particular strain, vairety, quantity or percentage of marijuana or active ingredient and the appropriate dosage.”

Senate Bill 153 does not allow patients to grow their own cannabis.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.