Tag: medical marijuana

Nearly 3 in 4 Utah Voters Support Medical Marijuana, Survey Finds

Utah’s neighbors to the west, south, and east all have legal, regulated cannabis markets for both medical and adult use. Now a new poll suggests that Utah voters want to legal medical marijuana in their state, too.

The Utah Patients Coalition survey, published Monday, found that of 402 Utah voters polled, 73% support a medical cannabis ballot initiative. Only about 20% were opposed, and 7% remain undecided.

Voters from nearly all demographic groups expressed support for medical marijuana, the survey found, included 64% of Republican voters and 63% of active voters who are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

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Older voters in Utah supported medical cannabis legalization at an even higher rate, with 75% of voters 50 and older in favor. And when asked about chronic pain, 72% of all respondents said they felt cannabis should be available as treatment.

“The poll results show overwhelming and broad support for medical cannabis in Utah,” said DJ Schanz, director of Utah Patients Coalition. “Voters believe that patients should be able to safely and legally access the medicine they need.”

The Utah Patients Coalition is also behind a prospective ballot initiative announced in Salt Lake City this week that would legalize medical cannabis in the state. Supporters say they’re frustrated by the Legislature’s inaction despite broad support for legalization from constituents.

Christine Stenquist, a campaign spokesperson for Utah Patients Coalition, said in a statement that Utah needs to adopt medicinal marijuana rules as soon as possible, especially in the face of the deadly opioid epidemic that has taken a heavy toll in Utah.

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“The opioid epidemic has already taken too many lives in our state,” Stenquist said. “We should allow medical cannabis as a treatment for chronic pain for two urgent reasons. First, medical cannabis is a more effective treatment for many patients. And second, it can potentially play a significant role in reducing the rate of opioid overdose deaths in Utah.”

The poll, conducted in February, was commissioned by the Marijuana Policy Project, a national cannabis reform organization. Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates, an opinion research firm, conducted the survey.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Puerto Rico: Young Generation Creating an Island of Cannabis Opportunity

I’m an hour and one tequila into a cocktail party in San Juan when I meet the duo who call themselves the “canna-hoods” of Puerto Rico.

This is technically a business party, a reception for press and presenters attending tomorrow’s AgroHack conference (a tech-agriculture-sustainability mashup), so they’re introduced to me simply by their names: Carmen Portela and Gaby Pagan. They’re the co-founders of Growth Leaders, a consulting company they created to shape the island’s nascent medical cannabis industry.

We find a table in the least noisy corner of the balmy, boozy restaurant patio and Portela and Pagan slide into an easy conversation that reveals how serious they are about their work, but also how much fun they’re having. In the past year they’ve scoped out grow operations in California, Florida, and Jamaica. They’ve hit eight conferences and workshops, including the annual Marijuana Business Conference in Las Vegas. “We juiced that one,” Portela says.

Gaby Pagan, left, and Carmen Portela: TK TK TK. (Colleen Kimmett for Leafly)Monticello owner Gaby Pagan, right, teamed up with Carmen Portela to create the cannabis consulting firm Growth Leaders. (Colleen Kimmett for Leafly)

Their mission, Portela says, is to “develop an ecosystem of the cannabis industry for it to be more inclusive.” Meaning an industry that prioritizes organic products and sustainable growth while making room for the small players who have been part of the underground cannabis community for years.

“We hustle with heart,” Portela tells me. Hence the Robin Hood reference.

In many ways, Portela and Pagan capture the spirit of the emerging medical cannabis sector in Puerto Rico. They are millennials with marketable skills who face the relatively high costs of living in San Juan and must create their own path to success on an island where 60 percent of the workforce is unemployed. They could easily chase careers in the mainland United States. Plenty of their peers have. But the Growth Leaders entrepreneurs have a deep desire to stay in Puerto Rico and create jobs here, at home, in an industry that could actually be good for the health of both people and the planet.

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Puerto Rico: A U.S. territory on the same growing latitude as Jamaica, and a consumer base of 3.5 million residents. (gregobagel/iStock)Puerto Rico: A U.S. territory on the same growing latitude as Jamaica, and a consumer base of 3.5 million residents. (gregobagel/iStock)

Ramping Up Quickly

Governor Alejandro García Padilla authorized the medicinal use of cannabis in 2015, and a legal regulatory framework is now working its way through government in the form of Senate Bill 340. Current regulations allow vaping, but prohibit smoking of the flower. Qualifying conditions include cancer, fibromyalgia, chronic pain and migraines.

Julian Marley’s company JuJu Royal is here. So is Colorado-based United Cannabis, and Canada’s CannaRoyalty.

With 3.5 million people, Puerto Rico’s population is about the size of Connecticut, but it’s a territory, not a state. As such, it’s not subject to federal tax laws, including IRS rule 280E, the one that prohibits cannabis businesses from claiming normal expenses. So the Caribbean island has business advantages the US mainland can’t offer. As a result, there’s been a flood of recent investment in the cannabis sector, all of it, as per Puerto Rican law, moving through majority-owned Puerto Rican companies.

Natural Ventures PR, one of the island’s first players, has already established a 100,000 square-foot cultivation facility and a 30,000 square-foot manufacturing facility in Caguas, an inland city about 15 miles south of San Juan.  The company now has licensing deals with CannaRoyalty, an investment firm based in Canada, and JuJu Royal, a Colorado company founded by Julian Marley. United Cannabis, a biotech corporation headquartered in Denver, recently partnered with San Juan-based Herbal Biotech Pathways Lab to establish a joint venture to market its Prana brand cannabis products.

The licensing process is expensive. Fees range from $5,000 to $10,000 for a manufacturing license and $20,000 for a dispensary license. Currently there are 17 dispensaries, eight cultivation facilities, four manufacturing facilities, and two laboratories approved by the Health Department. As of January, 2017, there were 114 dispensaries, 46 cultivation facilities, and 32 manufacturing facilities that had been pre-qualified for the approval process.

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Inside Track for Some

Pagan, who owns a smoke shop called Monticello on San Juan’s up-and-coming Loiza Street, told me that as she saw the industry develop, she felt a sense that “this is not fair.” When I asked what she meant, Portela jumped in.

“Like in any other state, if you have the money and the means, you have a license,” she said. “You get a cultivation and a manufacturing license—even if you don’t have any type of expertise.”

“This was an industry before it was legal,” noted Pagan.

One of their goals is to build a network of “creatives and innovators” who don’t have the capital to invest on the production side but could find opportunities in branding, marketing, and design.

“I’ve come from an industry that’s been illegal for a long time, so we’ve always had a kind of ‘whatever’ attitude towards the product. It has been tacky,” said Pagan. “Now, as the industry evolves, you have designers coming in, you have creatives coming in, and I’ve seen that trend in my store.”

Regenerative partner Frances Aparicio: 'I want to give great jobs. I want people to work with me, not for me.' (Colleen Kimmett for Leafly)Regenerative’s Frances Aparicio: ‘I want to give great jobs. I want people to work with me, not for me.’ (Colleen Kimmett for Leafly)

They’d like to develop a greener network of collaborators to build the cultivation and manufacturing sector here. So far, for example, no one in Puerto Rico is doing licensed outdoor or organic grows—and this on a Caribbean island that’s at almost the exact same latitude as Jamaica, which is world renowned for its outdoor cannabis grows.

When Parleta and Pagan met in 2015, they immediately connected over their shared cannabis politics. Together, they bring different strengths to the venture. Portela started her career in the Puerto Rican tourism bureau. That helped her develop a familiarity with the workings of government procedure and bureaucracy.  Pagan, by contrast, has been a fixture in her neighborhood’s growing independent arts and culture scene, opening Monticello not long after she graduated from the University of Puerto Rico.  “Gaby,” said Portela, “is the true nature of the industry.”

Today the duo serve as ambassadors of a sort, parsing Puerto Rico’s shifting regulatory landscape for investors abroad (“when it comes to regulations here, if you’re not in the know, it’s very complicated,” says Parleta), and bringing back useful intel, translated for a Spanish-speaking audience here.

‘I Want to Contribute to Puerto Rico’

At the conference, working a booth at the trade-show section of the conference, I met one of the young entrepreneurs of the type that Pagan and Parleta seek to target.

Government bureaucrats are said to ‘look for the cat’s fifth leg.’

Jim Rodriguez, 34, is the co-owner of Cultivana, which imports Magical Butter machines and distributes them to dispensaries on the island. Rodriguez, who has worked as a salesman and a chef, was already making edibles in his kitchen when “the cannabis industry in Puerto Rico began with the gossip, and then the boom.”

He and some friends decided to create a company and market the product. Getting certified to do so was really difficult, Rodriguez told me. He blamed the government, saying it “buscarle la quinta pata al gato”– it looks for the cat’s fifth leg, which is to say, makes things unnecessarily complicated.

“People really want this,” he said. “They need to work harder than in the States, but it’s possible.”

Rodriguez tells me that he and his partners are all in their 30s, have all put their own money into the venture so far, and have kept their day jobs for now. “So we are 24-hours-seven working,” he says. “But we have big faith in this industry, and we want this industry to be here, in Puerto Rico.”

The Cultivana crew: Bringing Magical Butter machines to Puerto Rico. (Colleen Kimmett for Leafly)

It’s a sentiment I heard again and again at the conference: the desire, especially from millennials, to build an economy on the island that can actually support the kind of lives they want to live.

I heard it from Frances Aparicio, a 28-year-old promoter and partner in the Regenerative Group, a medical cannabis holding corporation he and his best friend started two years ago. He told me that he believes the economic crisis is an opportunity for entrepreneurs like him.

“I want to contribute to Puerto Rico,” he said. “This is the most important thing. I want to give great jobs. I don’t want minimum federal wage; I hate that. I want people to work with me, not for me.”

Aparicio says there’s a shift happening in the mindset of Puerto Rican millennials, away from the “colonialist thinking” that once held up mainland America as the land of milk and honey. “This is Latin America,” he tells me. “And we need to think globally.”

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Some are Moving Cautiously

The Regenerative Group includes three partners from Puerto Rico, one from Colorado, and one from China. Aparicio tells me the Colorado partner, who wishes to remain anonymous, has put about $2 million into the licensing and construction of a cultivation facility. The company plans to build three dispensaries on the island as well.

Aparicio said that he’s cautious about moving too quickly. “I’m very careful with the funds that we have,” he told me. “I know a lot of people who are burning a lot of cash. . . one thing I’ve learned in life is being first is not going to win every time.”

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A Bottlenecked MMJ Card System

One of the barriers to developing the medical cannabis market in Puerto Rico right now is the fact that the government’s MMJ card system is bottlenecked. 10,000 individuals have applied for medical cannabis cards but only around 4,000 have received them. According to one recent report, there is only one staff member and one card printing machine at the department.

Problem: One government worker, one medical marijuana card-making machine, and 10,000 applicants.

Bigger players with deep pockets might be able to lose money until the user market grows, but new and emerging players don’t have that luxury. Aparicio co-founded the Puerto Rico Medical Cannabis Association to educate, lobby, and campaign on behalf of users. How frustrating is the application backlog?  Aparicio himself has a medical card from California but is still waiting on his ID from Puerto Rico.

Aparicio’s group recently launched a petition (#sialaflora) calling for the flower itself—one of those most affordable means of accessing cannabis—to be included in the legal regulatory framework.

They’re also trying to educate the populace about cannabis. Despite the fact that many young people are in favor of legalization, Puerto Rico remains a very conservative Catholic place.

Hector Santiago, an agronomist who works in the plant nursery business, recently started a cannabis-focused company called Be Better (which he tells me has pre-approval from the government for a cultivation license. He keeps his finger on the public pulse via his public radio show, Manos a la Tierra (Hands in the Earth). The show is about “everything agricultural,” he told me, “but I focus a lot on cannabis, and I receive a lot of callers who want to talk about this topic.”

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Jobs They Need in an Industry They Love

Santiago says most young people under 35 are enthusiastic. Seniors 65 and older are “very, very religious,” and they often initially opposed any form of legalization. They become more receptive, he said, when they realize that cannabis can be used to treat symptoms of glaucoma, fibromyalgia, and cancer. It’s the middle-agers, 40 to 60, Santiago said, who seem the most difficult to convince. “We were raised to believe that this is bad, this is not good, that it’s from the hell,” he said. “That’s the mindset that we have to change.”

Puerto Rico might not have to wait for islanders to change their minds. Puerto Rico’s current regulations include a reciprocity clause, which opens the possibility for individuals with medical marijuana cards from states like California and New York to use them on the island. This “canna-tourism” angle is what makes Puerto Rico particularly interesting to industry leaders on the mainland—particularly executives with companies based in New York, Illinois, and Massachusetts. If the cannabis market’s potential is realized in Puerto Rico, more ambitious young people like Carmen Portela will be able to stay on the island, “and get the jobs they need in the industry they love.”

“I mean,” Portela said, “why would you want to leave this paradise?”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Cannabis Tax Rates: A State-By-State Guide

Here’s how each state stacks up in terms of state taxes, excises taxes, and wholesale taxes on both medical and retail cannabis.

Click on a state to jump down to its tax guidelines.


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Alaska

  • Medical: No tax
  • Wholesale tax: $50 per oz on flower, $15 per oz for stems/leaves

For more information, please visit the Alaska Department of Revenue – Tax Division.

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Arizona

  • Medical: 6.6% state tax + 2-3% optional tax in cities

For more information, please refer to the Arizona Medical Marijuana Rules & Statutes.

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Arkansas

  • Medical: 4% state tax

For more information, please refer to the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Commission.

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California

  • Medical: Certain medical marijuana sales are tax-exempt
  • Retail: 15% excise tax
  • Wholesale: $9.25 per ounce of flowers, $2.75 for leaves

For more information, please refer to the Tax Guide for Medical Cannabis Businesses.

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Colorado

  • Medical: 2.9% sales tax
  • Retail: 2.9% sales tax + 10% excise tax
  • Wholesale: 15% excise tax

For more information, please refer to the Marijuana Taxes File at the Colorado Department of Revenue.

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Connecticut

  • Medical: $3.50 per gram

For more information, please refer to the Marijuana and Controlled Substances Tax.

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Delaware

  • Medical: No tax

For more information, please refer to the Delaware Medical Marijuana Act Regulations.

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District of Columbia

  • Medical: No tax
  • Retail: No retail sales allowed

For more information, please refer to the Department of Health Medical Marijuana Program.

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Hawaii

  • Medical: 4% excise tax, 4.5% tax on island of Oahu

For more information, please refer to the State of Hawaii Medical Marijuana Program.

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Illinois

  • Medical: 1% pharmaceutical tax
  • Wholesale: 7% tax on cultivators/dispensaries

For more information, please refer to the Medical Cannabis Cultivation Privilege Tax Law.

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Maine

  • Medical: No tax
  • Retail: 10% sales tax

For more information, please refer to the Sales of Medical Marijuana and Related Products and Recreational Marijuana in Maine.

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Massachusetts

  • Medical: No tax
  • Retail: TBD

For more information, please refer to the Medical Use of Marijuana Program.

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Michigan

  • Medical: 3% sales tax

For more information, please refer to the State of Michigan Tax Policy Newsletter.

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Minnesota

  • Medical: $3.50 per gram

For more information, please refer to the Minnesota Controlled Substance Tax.

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Montana

  • Medical: 4% from July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018; 2% after June 30, 2018

For more information, please refer to the Montana Marijuana Bill (SB0333).

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Nevada

  • Medical: 2% excise tax
  • Retail: 10% excise tax
  • Wholesale: 15% excise tax

For more information, please refer to the Nevada Department of Taxation Medical Marijuana Tax.

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New Hampshire

  • Medical: No tax

For more information, please refer to the Therapeutic Cannabis Program.

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New Jersey

  • Medical: 7% sales tax

For more information, please refer to the Medical Marijuana Alternative Treatment Center Taxation.

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New Mexico

  • Medical: No tax

For more information, please refer to the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program.

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New York

  • Medical: 7% excise tax

For more information, please refer to the Excise Tax on Medical Marijuana.

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North Dakota

  • Medical: No tax

For more information, please refer to House Bill 1430.

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Ohio

  • Medical: TBD

For more information, please refer to the Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program.

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Oregon

  • Medical: No tax
  • Retail: 17% state tax + 3% optional local municipality tax

For more information, please refer to the Oregon Department of Revenue Marijuana Tax Program.

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Pennsylvania

  • Wholesale: 5% excise tax

For more information, please refer to the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue Medical Marijuana Tax.

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Rhode Island

  • Medical: $25 per plant tag for patients/caregivers

For more information, please refer to the Edward O. Hawkins and Thomas C. Slater Medical Marijuana Act § 21-28.6-15 Medical marijuana plant tags.

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Vermont

  • Medical: Exempt from the Vermont Sales and Use Tax

For more information, please refer to the Taxation of Sales of Medical Marijuana and Related Paraphernalia.

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Washington

  • Medical: 37% excise tax
  • Retail: 8% state tax + 37% excise tax

For more information, please refer to the Department of Revenue – Taxes Due on Marijuana.

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West Virginia

  • Medical: No tax
  • Wholesale: 10% excise tax

For more information, please refer to Senate Bill 386.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Fate of New York’s PTSD Bill Rests With Cuomo

A bipartisan proposal that would add post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a qualifying condition for New York’s medical marijuana program has received final approval from state lawmakers. It now heads to the desk of Gov. Andrew Cuomo for final approval.

The Senate approved S 5629 on a 50–13 vote on Tuesday. The Assembly version of the bill, A 7006, passed with overwhelming support (131­–8) in May.

Veterans advocates, who pushed hard for the  addition, said the move would be a boon to the health and well being of those who served their country and would otherwise have to move out of the state to obtain cannabis legally.

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“Military veterans, first responders, and victims who have survived assault all deserve society’s respect and the best available treatments; they should not have to abandon their homes and move to another state in order to seek access to medical marijuana,” Michael Krawitz, executive director of Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access, said in a statement. “This is compassionate and commonsense legislation that is widely supported by the public as well as lawmakers from both sides of the aisle.”

Kate Bell, legislative counsel for the Marijuana Policy Project, added the group hopes Cuomo wastes no time in signing the bill.

“State lawmakers are standing up for thousands of New Yorkers who are suffering from PTSD and might benefit from medical marijuana,” she said. “We hope Gov. Cuomo will do the same and sign this important legislation. With a single swipe of his pen, he can help countless people find relief.”

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The bipartisan bill was introduced by Sen. Diane Savino (D-Staten Island) and seven co-sponsors, including Sen. Martin Golden (R-Brooklyn), who previously opposed medical marijuana legislation. The Assembly version was introduced by Assembly Health Committee Chair Richard N. Gottfried (D-Manhattan) with a bipartisan coalition of more than three dozen co-sponsors.

Out of the 29 states with medicinal marijuana programs, 26 of them allow patients with PTSD to qualify for medical marijuana. Both Colorado and Vermont recently added PTSD to their respective lists, and patients in New Hampshire are waiting for the governor’s signature on a bill recently passed by the Legislature.

“In the past year, 11 more states have approved allowing trauma survivors to use cannabis for PTSD. Now only three medical cannabis states exclude PTSD patients,” Bell of MPP said. “Senate Majority Leader John Flanagan and his colleagues should be commended for addressing the needs of New York residents who are dealing with this terrible condition, including our veterans. By signing this legislation, Gov. Cuomo can ensure New Yorkers don’t get left behind.”

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Mexico President Signs Bill Authorizing Medical Marijuana

Enrique Peña Nieto

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has signed into law a bill to make medical marijuana available in Mexico.

The new law, which was approved by lawmakers earlier this year, will direct the Ministry of Health to draft and implement policies to regulate the use, importation, and production of pharmaceutical products derived from CBD-dominant/low-THC cannabis.

Currently, CBD-infused products may be imported into the country on a case by case basis.

The bill was passed in April by a vote of 371 to 11.

Mexican lawmakers in 2009 decriminalized the personal possession of up to five grams of cannabis. Last year, President Nieto proposed legislation to increase this threshold to one ounce.

In 2015, Mexico’s Supreme Court ruled that federal anti-drug laws should not trump individuals’ rights to grow and consume cannabis for their own personal use.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Mexico Legalizes Medical Marijuana

A decree issued by Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto today confirmed that Mexico has legalized cannabis for medicinal use after overwhelming support from Mexico’s Lower House of Congress.

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Pena Nieto was once a vehement opponent of cannabis legalization, but has since called for a re-examination of global drug policy after a nationwide public debate on legalization in early 2016. “So far, the solutions [to control drugs and crime] implemented by the international community have been frankly insufficient,” Peña Nieto told the 2016 United Nations General Assembly Special Sessions in April 2016. “We must move beyond prohibition to effective prevention.”

Mexican President Enrique Peña NietoMexican President Enrique Peña Nieto By PresidenciaMX 2012-2018 (Own work); CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Last year, Peña Nieto even went so far as to introduce a measure that would allow Mexican citizens to possess up to an ounce of cannabis without repercussions, but the bill stalled in Congress.

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The medical marijuana bill sailed through the Senate with ease in December 2016, and Mexico’s lower house in parliament passed the bill in April with a vote of 347-7 in favor of approval. Mexico’s Secretary of Health, Dr. José Narro Robles, voiced his support for the measure, saying “I welcome the approval of the therapeutic use of cannabis in Mexico.”

The decree was issued by the president today and specifies that the Ministry of Health will be tasked with drafting and implementing the regulations “public policies regulating the medicinal use of pharmacological derivatives of cannabis sativa, indica and Americana or marijuana, including tetrahydrocannabinol, its isomers and stereochemical variants, as well as how to regulate the research and national production of them.”

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Mexico Supreme Court Paves the Way for Legal Cannabis

The decree effectively eliminates the criminalization of the medicinal use of cannabis, THC, CBD, and all cannabis derivatives, as well as legalizing the production and distribution of cannabis for medicinal and therapeutic uses.

“The ruling eliminates the prohibition and criminalization of acts related to the medicinal use of marijuana and its scientific research, and those relating to the production and distribution of the plant for these purposes,” stated the Lower House of Parliament, known as La Cámara de Diputados.

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Currently, the only cannabis that will be permitted must contain 1% or less of tetrahydrocannabinol, and the Ministry of Health will be required to study the medicinal and therapeutic effects of cannabis before creating the framework for a medical marijuana program infrastructure.

There will certainly still be hurdles to overcome on the bumpy road to medical marijuana, but Mexico just surpassed the biggest obstacle so far.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Ontario Dogs to Remain CBD-Free

The life of a dog can be an enviable thing, filled with sleeping, eating, and sniffing the butts of peers with impunity. But sometimes things go wrong, with the unluckiest dogs experiencing ailments like anxiety, chronic pain, persistent seizures, and osteoporosis. One potential remedy for these canine ills: CBD oil, which progressive pet owners have successfully used to treat their dogs’ serious medical conditions.

Unfortunately, officially sanctioned medical marijuana for dogs is a way off, as recent discussions between the College of Veterinarians of Ontario and the Office of Medical Cannabis at Health Canada confirmed that Canada’s Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations do not apply to veterinarians or their animal patients.

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“Both cannabis (marijuana) and cannabidiol are Schedule II drugs under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act,” notes the College of Veterinarians of Ontario. “As veterinarians are included in the definition of practitioner in this Act, veterinarians would be permitted to prescribe either substance if there was a legal pathway to do so. The Office of Controlled Substances at Health Canada has confirmed that there are currently no approved CBD products for animals, meaning there is no legal pathway to obtain these products for animals in Canada.”

A ray of hope: Colorado State University is currently conducting clinical trials for CBD as a possible treatment for epilepsy and osteoporosis in dogs. If successful, these trials could lead to FDA-approved cannabidiol treatments in the U.S., which might inspire Health Canada to follow suit.

In the meantime, please enjoy this photograph of a dog dressed as a pickle.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Marijuana Infused Tea is Effective in Treating Chronic Pain, Study Finds

PARMA, ITALY — Oral cannabis administration is safe and effective for the treatment of chronic pain conditions, according to clinical data published in the Journal of Pain Research.

Italian researchers conducted a retrospective case series analysis assessing the use of cannabinoids for intractable pain in a cohort of over 600 patients. Study subjects were typically over the age of 60 and consumed cannabinoids via infused tea.

Researchers reported that no subjects in the study complained of severe side effects, and that relatively few patients discontinued cannabis treatment.

They concluded: “[I]t can be stated that the treatment seems to be effective and safe in the majority of patients.”

In 2015, the Italian government authorized the use of cannabis to treat several debilitating conditions, including chronic pain, glaucoma, Tourette syndrome, multiple sclerosis, HIV/AIDS, and certain types of epilepsy.

In January, an extensive literature review by the US National Academy of Sciences acknowledged that “conclusive or substantial evidence” exists for cannabis’ efficacy in patients suffering from chronic pain, among other conditions.

Full text of the study, “Cannabis and intractable chronic pain: an explorative retrospective analysis of Italian cohort of 614 patients,” appears in the Journal of Pain Research.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Bipartisan CARERS Act Medical Marijuana Bill Reintroduced in US Senate

The United States Capitol in Washington, DC (Wikimedia/David Maiolo)

WASHINGTON, DC — United States Senators Rand Paul (R-KY), Corey Booker (D-NJ), and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) reintroduced a bill Thursday that would end the federal prohibition of medical marijuana. Sens. Mike Lee (R-UT) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) also signed on to the legislation as original co-sponsors.

The Compassionate Access, Research Expansion, and Respect States (or CARERS) Act of 2017 would allow individuals and entities to possess, produce, and distribute medical marijuana if they are in compliance with state medical marijuana laws. It would also open up avenues to medical marijuana research and allow physicians employed by the Department of Veterans Affairs to recommend medical marijuana to veterans in states where it is legal. The bill also proposes excluding cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in marijuana, from the federal government’s definition of “marijuana.”

This is the second time the CARERS Act has been introduced. It was first introduced on March 10, 2015, during the 114th Congress.

Twenty-nine states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. territories of Guam and Puerto Rico have enacted effective medical marijuana laws. An additional 19 states have adopted laws that recognize the medical value of marijuana but are unworkable or exceptionally limited.

According to an April poll conducted by Quinnipiac University, 94 percent of U.S. voters support allowing adults to legally use marijuana for medical purposes, including 96 percent of Democrats, 90 percent of Republicans, and 95 percent of independents.

“The reintroduction of the CARERS Act is the first of many steps we hope this Congress will take to end the federal prohibition of medical marijuana,” Don Murphy, director of conservative outreach for the Marijuana Policy Project, said in a statement. “The addition of Sens. Lee and Murkowski as original co-sponsors should inspire other Republicans to seriously consider this legislation and the absurd federal overreach that it seeks to correct. Marijuana is effective in the treatment of several debilitating conditions. The federal government should not be meddling in state laws that allow it or obstructing research into its many medical benefits.

“Polls show overwhelmingly strong support for medical marijuana, and it spans the political spectrum. There is no better example of an issue that garners the level of bipartisan support necessary to pass meaningful legislation. Twenty-nine states and our nation’s capital have enacted effective medical marijuana programs, and an additional 19 states have adopted laws that recognize marijuana’s medical value. There is no rational reason to continue prohibiting seriously ill patients from using this medicine or punishing those who provide it to them,” added Murphy.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Colorado Governor Signs Law Allowing Medical Cannabis for PTSD

DENVER, CO — Governor John Hickenlooper has signed legislation, Senate Bill 17, permitting physicians to recommend cannabis therapy to patients suffering from post-traumatic stress.

PTSD is the first new qualifying condition to be added since the state legalized medical cannabis in 2001.

Members of the Colorado Board of Health had previously rejected efforts to include PTSD as a qualifying condition, opining that sufficient evidence did not yet support its efficacy.

More information is available here.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.