Tag: medical marijuana

Government Will Provide Patients With CBD Products for Treatment in Mexico

This article is sponsored by CMW Media, the premier public and media relations agency proudly serving the cannabis industry worldwide.  


Medical Marijuana, Inc., the first publicly traded cannabis company in the United States, will provide the government of the State of Mexico with medical-grade CBD hemp oil products from its subsidiary HempMeds Mexico®, which will be used in the treatment of patients suffering from a variety of conditions including refractory epilepsy and Lennox Gastaut-Syndrome.

The deal marks the first time a government in Mexico has purchased CBD products for its citizens, and follows a series of steps in Mexico’s courts and legislature that have made CBD products more accessible to patients. These include the approval of CBD products from HempMeds Mexico by the Mexican health ministry COFEPRIS.

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Mexico is just the latest nation in Latin America to make it easier for patients to integrate CBD products into their healthcare regimens. Since 2015, similar steps have been taken by the governments of Brazil and Paraguay. 

The State of Mexico’s Governor Eruviel Avila Villegas distributed HempMeds Mexico’s flagship product Real Scientific Hemp Oil-X™ (RSHO-X™), a CBD hemp oil containing zero THC, to patients during the opening of a new clinic in the Mexico City suburb of Ecatepec. Avila was joined at the event by Mexican cannabis activist Raul Elizalde and César Nomar Gómez Monge, Health Minister of the State of Mexico.

The State of Mexico’s Health Minister, César Nomar Gómez Monge, speaks on the potential treatment value of CBD for epilepsy patients. (Moises Ramirez)

“We want to congratulate the State of Mexico’s government for this historic purchase of our CBD products to help relieve the suffering of its citizens,” said Medical Marijuana, Inc. president and CEO Dr. Stuart Titus.  

“We are a company of firsts, and this is another first. We are excited to achieve the historic milestone of having the Mexican government purchase our CBD products to benefit its citizens. The plethora of benefits of medical cannabis in treating several types of indications is undeniable, and we are encouraged to see not only healthcare professionals, [but] now also governments, become increasingly interested in how CBD hemp oil can help heal.”

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Epilepsy is among the many indications that can benefit from medical marijuana products. A new study led by Dr. Saul Garza Morales, a pediatric researcher and neurologist in Mexico, helps expand on that body of work.

Recently, Dr. Garza Morales shared the positive results of a recent study he conducted on the effects of Medical Marijuana, Inc.’s RSHO-X™ product in treating children with severe epilepsy. Dr. Garza and his collaborators found that 86% of the 38 patients included in the study saw the frequency of their motor seizures cut in half. Five subjects were even totally seizure-free for four full months, a result that is usually only achieved following major surgeries.

“With the advent of RSHO-X therapy, doctors have a new approach—using natural CBD in its natural, botanical form,” said Dr. Garza. “This has shown to control seizure episodes in epilepsy children to a significant degree, meaning invasive surgeries are now a resort of last measure.” 


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Hispanic Caucus of State Legislators Calls for Marijuana Decriminalization

BOSTON, MA — Members of the National Hispanic Caucus of State Legislators have for the first time voted in favor of a resolution in support of decriminalizing marijuana.

The NHCSL is a non-partisan group that represents the interests of Hispanic state lawmakers from all fifty states.

The resolution states that federal cannabis criminalization is “unconstitutional” because it was initiated by “racist politicians” who explicitly wished to “target … Mexican-American culture.”

It calls on federal lawmakers to “enact and sign legislation to federally decriminalize marijuana.”

It urges state lawmakers to similarly enact decriminalization policies and to seal the records of those formerly convicted of marijuana-related crimes.

“NHCSL believes that our laws should focus on ending the current lawlessness of the black market and allow sound public policy based on scientific evidence to prevail on the issue of cannabis,” the group’s President stated in a press release.

The NHCSL’s actions come days after representatives of the National Conference of State Legislators resolved in favor of removing marijuana from the federal Controlled Substances Act.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s Patients Find Relief in Medical Marijuana

(Sonya Yruel/Drug Policy Alliance)

FORT COLLINS, CO — Patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis report that cannabis effectively mitigates many of their symptoms, according to survey data published in the journal Complementary Therapies in Medicine.

Five hundred and ninety-five subjects responded to an online questionnaire hosted on the Michael J. Fox Foundation and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society webpages.

Respondents reported that cannabis was highly effective (6.4 on a scale from zero to 7) at providing symptom management, and 59 percent of participants said that they had reduced their use of prescription drugs since initiating medical marijuana treatment.

Those respondents who identified themselves as medical cannabis users reported lower overall levels of disability compared to non-users, specifically in the domains of memory, mood, and fatigue.

Placebo-controlled clinical trials assessing the use of both whole-plant cannabis and/or cannabis-derived extracts in patients with MS have consistently shown efficacy in the mitigation of spasticity and other symptoms.

A plant cannabis-derived spray, Sativex, is available by prescription for the treatment of MS in Canada, the United Kingdom, and in several other countries.

Patients with PD consistently report subjective benefits from cannabis, particularly for the mitigation of tremors and bradykinsea (slowness of movement).

Full text of the study, “Cannabis use in people with Parkinson’s disease and Multiple Sclerosis: A web-based investigation,” appears in Complementary Therapies in Medicine.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Court: Marijuana’s Schedule I Status Does Not Justify Workplace Discrimination Against State-Qualified Patients

HARTFORD, CT — A federal district court judge has determined that marijuana’s illicit status under federal law does not preempt statewide protections explicitly prohibiting qualified medical cannabis patients from facing discrimination in the workplace.

The defendant in the case, Bride Brook Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, argued that marijuana’s classification as a Schedule I drug under the US Controlled Substances Act provided a legal basis for its decision to rescind a job offer to a would-be employee after she failed a drug screen.

United States District Court Judge Jeffrey Alker Meyer disagreed. He wrote:

“This lawsuit calls upon me to decide if federal law preempts Connecticut law. In particular, I must decide if federal law precludes enforcement of a Connecticut law that prohibits employers from firing or refusing to hire someone who uses marijuana for medicinal purposes. I conclude that the answer to that question is ‘no’ and that a plaintiff who uses marijuana for medicinal purposes in compliance with Connecticut law may maintain a cause of action against an employer who refuses to employ her for this reason.”

The ruling follows that of a similar decision in Massachusetts in July which determined that state-registered medical cannabis patients may sue a private employer for discrimination if they are fired for their off-the-job marijuana use.

The case is Noffsinger v. SSC Niantic Operating Company, LLC.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Fired MMJ Patient Can Sue Employer, Federal Court Rules

Employers can be sued for refusing to hire applicants who test positive for medical marijuana, a federal judge in Connecticut ruled last week.

While the ruling alone doesn’t yet protect medical marijuana patients, it advances a lawsuit that could eventually carve out workplace protections for legal cannabis use.

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In the case, Noffsinger v. SSC Niantic Operating Co., therapist Katelin Noffsinger is alleging that the company reneged on its decision to hire her for a position at Bride Book Nursing and Rehabilitation Center because she acknowledged using medical marijuana.

Noffsinger, who suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder, began taking doctor-recommended THC capsules in 2015, according to the lawsuit. She takes them every night to help her sleep.

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Niantic, CT-based Bride Brook hired Noffsinger in July 2016. Ahead of a pre-employment drug screening, she informed the company that she was a medicinal marijuana patient with a doctor’s recommendation for cannabis.

According to Noffsinger’s complaint, one day before she was supposed to start her new job—and after she had quit her former job—Bride Brook rescinded her job offer, citing the positive drug test.

Noffsinger alleges that action was discriminatory and violated Connecticut’s law allowing medical cannabis consumption. Bride Brook argued that the federal Controlled Substances Act preempts state law permitting medical cannabis.

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In his ruling allowing the lawsuit to proceed, US District Court Judge Jeffrey Alker Meyer wrote that the  CSA doesn’t preempt state law in such circumstances:

This lawsuit calls upon me to decide if federal law preempts Connecticut law. In particular, I must decide if federal law precludes enforcement of a Connecticut law that prohibits employers from firing or refusing to hire someone who uses marijuana for medicinal purposes. I conclude that the answer to that question is ‘no’ and that a plaintiff who uses marijuana for medicinal purposes in compliance with Connecticut law may maintain a cause of action against an employer who refuses to employ her for this reason.

As the ruling was at the trial-court level, it doesn’t establish precedent that would apply to other fired workers who sue employers. Nevertheless it provides a test case that could signal how future cases will unfold.

Courts in many legal states have ruled that medical marijuana laws do not protect employees from being fired for cannabis use. That changed abruptly last month when the Massachusetts Supreme Court ruled that denying employment on the grounds that a prospective employee uses medical cannabis could violate antidiscrimination laws by failing to reasonably accommodate the employee’s medical condition.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Real-Life Tales of Travelling with Medical Marijuana

When Peggy Kennedy arrives at a Canadian airport to travel within the country, she can never anticipate if she’s going to be treated like a criminal or a regular passenger.

That’s because she’s been a medicinal marijuana patient since 2015. Her doctor agreed to prescribe it to help deal with the severe pain she lives with from a tractor-trailer accident in the late ‘90s.

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As a regular traveler within the country, Ontario-based Kennedy will bring the maximum amount that patients are allowed to possess–150 grams–in oils, balms, and dried flower, along with her prescription. Then she hopes for things to roll along smoothly—but that doesn’t always happen.

If Kennedy had to give a Yelp review on how she was treated as a passenger travelling with medicinal cannabis, she would give Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport five stars and Toronto’s Pearson Airport zero stars. There, she was searched, detained, and threatened with a bench warrant if her credentials didn’t work out. (They did.) She admits that travelling as a medicinal-marijuana patient is stressful, confusing and tedious, as the guidelines have never been straightforward.

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“The rules change constantly, despite the fact that they don’t tell you they’ve changed,” she tells Leafly. “I don’t enjoy being singled out, searched, pulled aside…in the end they always let me go, but it’s humiliating having people stare at you.”

As Canada’s July 1, 2018 deadline for legalization approaches, there’s still a lot of uncertainty about how medical-marijuana patients should travel with their medicine.

For Kennedy, there are few other options when it comes to travelling with the only medication that helps manage her pain. “I can’t not travel with it and make life easier, I have to travel with it,” she says.

UNCERTAINTY AMONG PATIENTS

As Canada’s July 1, 2018 deadline for legalization approaches, there’s still a lot of uncertainty about how medical-marijuana patients should travel with their medicine. Meanwhile, the number of registered patients in the country swiftly continues to spike. According to Health Canada, at the end of March, nearly 167,000 Canadians were signed up with one of the country’s 38 licensed producers.

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The brief notice on the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) website states that while medical marijuana is permitted in carry-on and checked luggage, travelers must be prepared to show medical documentation. Once security has been informed, police will be called, if they are present in the airport, to verify the documentation. The type of documentation needed depends on the individual patient, though that isn’t specified on the website. If patients get their medicine from a licensed producer, documentation would be a prescription, while those who grow themselves would need to bring a document issued by Health Canada. The CATSA website does not specify how much medicinal marijuana a patient is allowed to bring onboard.

CATSA’s Matthieu LaRoche says it’s a simple process as long as the passenger is forthcoming. “Let the screening officers know you’re travelling with medicial marijuana,” he explains. “They’ll alert local police at the airport and validate the passenger’s documents and they’ll be able to continue to the gate.”

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Passengers can request that this step be done in a private room and away from other passengers, LaRoche says, admitting that “being told we’re going to call the police can be intimidating.”

When it comes to international travel, however, the one rule is straightforward: Leave your pot at home.

ALTERNATIVE OPTIONS

Jonathan Zaid is the founder and executive director Canadians for Fair Access to Medical Marijuana (CFAMM). He spends a lot of time talking to patients looking to travel internationally but are unsure what to do about their medicine.

“Legally, the only option is not to take it,” he says. “The other option is a pharmaceutical which will give them some level of relief, an interim medication they can take across borders.”

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Zaid suggests Nabilone, a synthetic analogue of THC that helps with nausea, sleep, and pain, or Sativex, an alcohol extraction derived from cannabis that’s sprayed under the tongue.

The last option, he adds, is to obtain medicinal marijuana at your destination, but only in compliance with a country’s local laws and regulations concerning legalized cannabis.

That’s exactly what Ellen Durkee does, but only when she’s visiting California. The Maritime-based retiree, who’s been a patient since 2010, was invited there for a medicinal Cannabis Cup, which had a doctor on site. She paid the $100 consultation fee and can now buy her supplies when visiting the state. However, she otherwise knows not to travel internationally with her medicine. Durkee says that when she does travel abroad without medication, the biggest consequence is the heightened pain from her condition that she has to face as a result.

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Unlike Kennedy, Durkee has only been stopped once while travelling within Canada with her medicinal cannabis, and only after she informed security she was travelling with 30 grams. When the RCMP checked her through, one official advised her to put it in her luggage and not say anything next time, which contradicts LaRoche’s instructions. Since then, she’s followed that advice and has never been stopped.

WHAT THE FEDS SAY

A spokesperson for Health Canada told Leafly that it’s the patient responsibility to learn about guidelines and restrictions relating to travelling with their medications. The Global Affairs Canada website has directives, recommending passengers “carry a copy of the original prescription and ensure that both the generic and trade names of the medication are included in case of loss or theft. A doctor’s note describing why you are taking the medication is also recommended.” However, there’s no specific mention of cannabis.

FUTURE CHANGES UNCLEAR

Zaid sees the current system as problematic. When police or RCMP at the airport screens patients, they are obtaining information about how much cannabis the passenger is travelling with. “There’s no kind of data security mechanisms to keep track of that and patients are receiving all kinds of information [on what they should do when they travel with their medicinal marijuana],” he says.

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Earlier this year, Canadians for Fair Access to Medical Marijuana filed a formal complaint with the privacy commissioner of Canada to look into the situation. They want to determine whether tracking legally authorized patient’s information—who is flying with what amount of medicinal cannabis—is a privacy violation on the part of police or RCMP.

“There’s no regulatory or legal obligation for them to do that,” Zaid says. “Their job is to ensure protection of aviation and what goes along with that, rather than tracking legally authorized medications.”

The CFAMM website also provides tips on travelling with medicinal cannabis. It advises travelling with receipts and Health Canada-issued documents, as well as any original bottles from licensed producers. It also suggest travellers grant themselves extra time at airports.

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Zaid can’t predict whether travelling as a patient will get easier or more challenging once legalization is in place. He suspects the biggest challenge for Canada will be making changes to international regulations and treaties that the country is part of.

Since most treaties allow the import and export of marijuana for medicinal purposes, he sees potential for the government to open it up to patients.

“There really isn’t a reason why, if you have a legal destination with medical cannabis and you’re legally authorized, you shouldn’t be allowed to cross borders like you would with any other medications,” he says.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Feds to Study Medical Marijuana’s Effect on Opioid Use

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently awarded a five-year, $3.8 million grant to researchers for the first long-term investigation to see if medical marijuana reduces opioid use among adults with chronic pain.

The study will use real medical cannabis from New York dispensaries, not low-quality NIDA product.

The federal grant, given to scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System, could provide peer-reviewed evidence of the widespread but anecdotal phenomenon of chronic pain patients stepping down from opioid use to a safer reliance on medical cannabis to manage and alleviate their pain. Notably, the study will use real medical cannabis from licensed dispensaries in New York State, not the lower-quality “research grade” cannabis grown by federal contractors in Mississippi.

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“There is a lack of information about the impact of medical marijuana on opioid use in those with chronic pain,” Chinazo Cunningham, associate chief of general internal medicine at Einstein and Montefiore and principal investigator on the grant, said in a media release. “We hope this study will fill in the gaps and provide doctors and patients with some much needed guidance.”

The study will have a special focus on chronic pain patients with HIV. Cunningham plans to enroll 250 HIV-positive and HIV-negative adults with chronic pain who use opioids and who have received certification from their physicians to use medical marijuana, which is provided through approved dispensaries in New York State.

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Over 18 months, the study subjects will complete web-based questionnaires every two weeks, which will focus on pain levels and the medical and illicit use of marijuana and opioids. They’ll also provide urine and blood samples at in-person research visits every three months. In addition, in-depth interviews with a select group of these participants will explore their perceptions of how medical marijuana use affects the use of opioids.

Compared to the general population, chronic pain and opioid use is even more common in people with HIV. Between 25 and 90 percent of adults with HIV suffer from chronic pain. Previous studies have reported that despite the high risk for misuse of opioid pain relievers, adults with HIV are likely to receive opioids to help manage their pain. In recent years, medical marijuana has gained recognition as a treatment option. Twenty-nine states, plus the District of Columbia, have legalized its use; in those states, chronic pain and/or HIV/AIDS are qualifying conditions for medical marijuana use.

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Researchers have never studied—in any population—if the use of medical marijuana over time reduces the use of opioids. Additionally, there are no studies on how the specific chemical compounds of marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), affect health outcomes, like pain, function, and quality of life. Most studies that have reported negative effects of long-term marijuana use have focused on illicit, rather than medical, marijuana.

“As state and federal governments grapple with the complex issues surrounding opioids and medical marijuana, we hope to provide evidence-based recommendations that will help shape responsible and effective healthcare practices and public policies,” Cunningham said.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

No One Has Applied to Grow or Sell Medical Marijuana in Arkansas (Yet)

LITTLE ROCK, AR — Arkansas is halfway through the application period for medical marijuana growers and dispensaries for their fledgling medical marijuana program, and so far the total number of applications received is zero.

While some naysayers could claim this shows little interest in the upcoming medical marijuana industry in Arkansas, a spokesperson for the state says they’re not concerned as applicants are most likely being diligent in navigating the complex application process.

“We are not concerned, as we understand the applications require detailed and specific information that will take time to complete,” Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration spokesman Scott Hardin told The Associated Press.

“Applicants are likely performing their due diligence to provide quality applications,” Hardin says, noting that the applications are likely to be received closer to the September 18 deadline.

Meanwhile, over 400 completed patient applications have been approved to date, according to the Department of Health, who estimates approximately 30,000 residents will eventually participate in the program.

Medical marijuana identification cards will not be issued until 30 days prior to the first dispensaries opening.

Issue 6, the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Amendment, was approved by voters on November 8, garnering over 53 percent of the vote.

More information on the Arkansas medical marijuana program is available from the Arkansas Department of Health.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

New York Medical Marijuana Program Could Expand Under DOH Proposal

New York, NY (WikiMedia Commons)

NEW YORK, NY — The New York State Department of Health has announced the issuance of new proposed regulations that would make changes to the state’s medical marijuana program to improve access.

Among other things, they would reduce some of the onerous security requirements for registered organizations, shorten the length of the medical marijuana course certifying practitioners must take from four hours to two, and allow additional types of medical marijuana products to be sold.

“This is yet another positive step forward for New York State’s Medical Marijuana Program,” said New York State Department of Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker. “These regulations will continue to improve the program in several ways, including making new forms of medical marijuana available and improving the dispensing facility experience.”

New York’s medical marijuana program has been criticized by patient advocates as unnecessarily restrictive, and initial patient registration numbers were very low compared to other state medical marijuana programs.

The Department of Health has made several changes to the program since it issued a report in August 2016, including adding chronic pain as a qualifying condition and allowing registered nurses and physician’s assistants to recommended medical marijuana.

Lawmakers have also been working to improve the medical marijuana program this session. In June, the Legislature passed a bill to add post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a qualifying condition. Gov. Andrew Cuomo must still sign the bill in order for it to become law.

“Many of the patients I worked with to help pass New York’s medical marijuana law have been unable to benefit from the program due to high prices and the inability to find a medical professional who is participating,” said patient advocate Kate Hintz in a statement. “I’m hopeful that the reduction in burdens on practitioners will encourage more of them to participate, and that these regulatory changes will help registered organizations reduce their costs, with those savings then being passed on to patients.

“We are grateful to the Department of Health for listening to what patients need and working to expand the program and increase access to medical marijuana,” said Kate Bell, legislative counsel at the Marijuana Policy Project.  “Different patients benefit from different types of products, and we are glad that the new rules will allow a wider variety of choices. This is a great step toward reducing costs and improving patients’ options.”

Here are the proposed changes, as posed in a press release issued by the Department of Health:

Expanding the Variety of Medical Marijuana Products

Under the new regulations, registered organizations will be allowed to manufacture and distribute additional products including topicals such as lotions, ointments and patches, as well as solid and semi-solid products including chewable and effervescent tablets and lozenges. Certain non-smokable forms of ground plant material will also be permissible for manufacture and distribution. All products will be subject to rigorous testing and the Department will reserve the right to exclude inappropriate products or those which pose a threat to the public.

Improving the Dispensing Facility Experience

The new regulations will also allow prospective patients and practitioners to enter a dispensing facility to speak directly with an RO representative, learn about products, and get information about the medical marijuana program.In addition, these measures will allow people other than designated caregivers to accompany certified patients to the dispensing facility.

Refining the Training Program for Practitioners

Based on feedback from practitioners,the Department’s proposed regulations will allow for shortened versions of the practitioner’s course required to certify patients for medical marijuana, in addition to the currently available four-hour courses.The Department will work with course providers to offer a two-hour course, which is similar to other medical education courses.

Other Regulatory Actions

In addition, the proposed regulations also make a number of changes to help enhance the medical marijuana program. These changes include broadening the capability of registered organizations to advertise, streamlining the manufacturing requirements for medical marijuana products, amending security requirements, and clarifying laboratory testing methods, among other actions.

For more information on New York’s Medical Marijuana Program, visit: https://www.health.ny.gov/regulations/medical_marijuana/.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Cannabis Shows Great Promise in Treating Cancer—Let’s Not Wreck It With Hyperbole

There’s no topic like cancer to inspire cacophonous claims of a cure, pegged to everything from the rinds of fruits nobody has ever eaten to powders drawn from Micronesian beaches no one has ever visited. As such, claims of miracle cures for cancer typically cause the medical establishment to roll their eyes and avert their attention.

This is why it’s so important to eschew such cure-related hyperbole when discussing the cancer-treating components of cannabis, which could all too easily be lumped into the same National Enquirer “wonder cure” category.

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Such talk is especially counterproductive given that there is little doubt that cannabis plays a very important role as a treatment option for cancer—a fact even government agencies are ready to acknowledge, issuing statements on cannabis and cancer that are profoundly encouraging.

The National Cancer Institute has said that “Cannabis has been shown to kill cancer cells in the laboratory.” (Presumably it does something similar outside of the laboratory, but taking cannabis from lab to bedside is an exercise in Schedule-I bureaucratic frustration.) In addition, the NCI states that “[c]annabinoids appear to kill tumor cells but do not affect their non-transformed counterparts and may even protect them from cell death.”

Anecdotes of success in treating cancer with cannabis can’t be ignored—they’re what’s driven the medicalization of cannabis for a long time.

This is because cannabis is what’s known as “pro-apoptotic.” Apoptosis means that a cell commits suicide. Cannabis encourages this in some cancer cells while protecting non-cancer cells from the same fate. As any oncologist will tell you, killing cancer cells while not affecting normal tissue is one of the Holy Grails of treatment. Cannabis can also prevent cancer cells from further dividing, spreading, and growing.

Even the National Institute of Drug Abuse—an organization historically devoted to vilifying cannabis—has gotten on board, stating that “marijuana extracts may help kill certain cancer cells and reduce the size of others.” Not even they can ignore the science.

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Anecdotes of success in treating cancer with cannabis can’t be ignored—they’re what’s driven the medicalization of cannabis for a long time. But anecdotes aren’t enough to support touting cannabis as a miracle cure. As always with cannabis and its 144 cannabinoids, the range of effects and variations is vast. Medical cannabis is still the wild west. One size simply does not fit all. There are just too many permutations.

So let it be said, loudly and often: Cannabis is not a cure for cancer. It is not a panacea that has been evilly suppressed by greedy pharmaceutical corporations.

Exaggerations such as these do nothing but sabotage the potential of cannabis. T-shirts emblazoned with “Cannabis Cures Cancer” and assorted leafy greens simply give the appearance of Rastafarian snake oil.

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Let’s not further embolden biased clueless conservatives, who look for reasons to further vilify cannabis and stigmatize cannabis users. Now is the time for common sense and reason rather than common screech and rhetoric. Overcoming stigma means reversing ideas that are all too often loosely formed yet firmly held.

Progress in cannabinoid science is truly exciting and packed with great promise If we are to advance, the focus needs to be on objective science and studies. Let’s keep it that way.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.