Tag: medical marijuana

Canadians for Fair Access to Medical Marijuana Takes Aim at Quebec

Medical cannabis advocates are gearing up for the Quebec government’s public consultations on legal marijuana. Last weekend in Montreal, Daphnée Elisma, Québec representative of Canadians for Fair Access to Medical Marijuana and pictured below, led a discussion group for medical-cannabis patients of Montreal’s Santé Cannabis clinic. Her goal was to help them prepare, formulate, and articulate their comments during the government’s consultation process (which runs in different cities until mid-September), whether they plan to attend in person, or whether they will write letters if they are to unwell to be there physically.

Photo credit: Sasha Brunelle

“I explained to them how to present themselves on the different issues in the rights of patients who are using cannabis for medical purposes,” she told Leafly, noting that principal among her concerns are issues relating to distribution and taxation. “We’ve been asking the government to think about patients when they plan the legislation, and to have a different tax system than the recreational market for the medical users. Right now we’re being taxed, and it’s unfair for users to have to pay taxes on cannabis for medical purposes. When you go to the pharmacy and buy something prescribed by a doctor, you don’t pay taxes on that. Patients who use cannabis for medical purposes still have to pay that tax, and it’s a barrier to access. We have people on welfare using medical cannabis, and they have to choose either to eat or to buy their medicine. We’d like the government to fix that issue.”

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During the session, she noted, one of the issues that patients raised several times was the need for improved research into medical cannabis.

“Patients with chronic conditions face unfair barriers when it comes to making informed decisions on the uses of cannabis for medical purposes due to the lack of clinical medical research,” Elisma said. “We need more funding to support the onerous licensing requirements that researchers are facing at the moment. By taxing the recreational market, the Quebec government would be able to use the tax revenue from cannabis as a source of funding for education and research.”

Quebec has one of the highest barriers to medical cannabis in Canada.

She also called on the government to pour funds into cannabis education—both for medical school students, and for the public, stressing the need to lessen stigma against medical cannabis users.

At the moment, Quebec has one of the highest barriers to medical cannabis in Canada. The guidelines for prescribing cannabis from the Collège des médecins du Québec (Quebec College of Physicians) note that “[t]he use of cannabis for medical purposes is not a recognized treatment” and “an unrecognized treatment can only be used within a research framework.” Before a physician can prescribe medical cannabis, they must first prescribe other forms of cannabinoids—which some find harsh and disorienting. If the patient wishes to receive medical cannabis after that, they must also receive a “complete medical assessment.” Few of these obstacles exist for patients being prescribed opioid painkillers.

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“There is not enough scientific evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of cannabis dried for medical purposes,” the Collège des médecins du Québec’s Press Relation Leslie Labranche told Leafly. “The current state of knowledge as well as the rare studies and evidence on the subject leave physicians perplexed. That’s why physicians in Québec may prescribe cannabis within [the] cannabis framework.”

In January, the Montreal Gazette reported that some of the city’s clinics were turning to doctors located outside of Quebec, for whom the process of prescribing cannabis is significantly less onerous. According to the Collège des médecins du Québec, it is against the law for a doctor outside of Quebec to prescribe cannabis to a patient in Quebec.

“We have issues with the Collège des médecins,” said Elisma. “They don’t consider cannabis an approved drug, and they’ve been saying for years that cannabis is not backed by any research. That’s not true. We know there’s a lot of research that’s been done in the past, so we’re asking the government to do more research in order to get a more correct picture of the medical value of cannabis. We’ve seen research showing improvement for children with epilepsy treated with CBD. The population needs to know this—how things like CBD affect the body.”

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Labranche reported that the Collège des médecins du Québec is partially supporting the project “The Quebec Cannabis Register: A Research Database on the Use of Dried Cannabis for Medical Purpose,” led by Dr. Mark A. Ware, McGill University Health Centre and the Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids.

While the Collège des médecins remains conservative in its approaches, Elisma is optimistic about the provincial consultations. In June, she joined doctors, researchers, scientists, and government functionaries in the two-day Forum of Experts on Regulation of Cannabis in Québec. Both an advocate and a patient, Elisma relies on three grams of vaporized cannabis per day to help her cope with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, which she developed following having a cancerous tumour removed from her breast. As such, she grounds her activism in personal experience.

“The fact that they’re having public consultations, this to me is a good sign,” she said. “It shows the government wants to start a conversation between experts and patients. This is why an organization like Canadians for Fair Access to Medical Marijuana is working so hard to move this discussion forward. This happens slowly, but I have a feeling we’re going to get somewhere. People are ready to express their feelings about the value of cannabis for medicinal purposes, and the obstacles they’ve faced over the years to accessing it.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Study: Military Veterans More Likely to Consume Cannabis for Therapeutic Purposes

Study: Military Veterans More Likely to Consume Cannabis for Therapeutic Purposes | NORML

ANN ARBOR, MI — Nearly half of military veterans who report having used cannabis in the past year did so for medical purposes, according to data published online ahead of print in the journal Addictive Behaviors. A team of investigators from the University of Michigan and the Ann Arbor VA Center for Clinical Management Research assessed the prevalence […]

Study: Military Veterans More Likely to Consume Cannabis for Therapeutic Purposes | The Daily Chronic


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Tilray Secures Portugal License, Plans EU Expansion

Tilray, one of Canada’s largest licensed producers, has secured a license to produce medical cannabis in Portugal. Earlier this morning, the company announced that Government of Portugal has issued the Nanaimo, BC-based LP a license to import cannabis genetics and cultivate cannabis for medical purposes.

The company also said it would invest up to €20 million (C$29.2 million) in a European Union campus based in the BIOCANT Research Park in Cantanhede, Portugal, an agricultural and biosciences hub between Porto and Lisbon. The first phase of the project, expected to be completed by the spring of 2018, includes an indoor laboratory and genetics bank, outdoor cultivation sites, a 10,000-square-meter greenhouse, and a 1,500-square-meter processing facility.

Tilray is owned by Privateer Holdings, the Seattle-based private equity firm that also owns Leafly.

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“For the past two years we’ve been working hard to find the right location for cultivation, processing, and research facilities to serve rapidly growing demand for high-quality medical cannabis products in Europe,” Tilray CEO Brendan Kennedy said in a statement released by the company. “Portugal has the ideal climate to cultivate cannabis, a highly-skilled health care workforce, and a vibrant research community. It’s more environmentally-friendly and cost-effective to supply European patients from Portugal than from northern climates.”

The Portuguese license and facility continues the Canadian company’s global expansion, which includes subsidiaries in Germany, Australia, and New Zealand.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

House Committee Rejects Medical Marijuana Protections

In a significant blow to medical marijuana advocates, patients, and cannabis companies around the nation, the House Rules Committee has rejected protections for MMJ patients and banks that want to serve state-legal cannabis businesses.

The Rohrabacher-Blumenauer amendment (a spending bill amendment that prevents the Department of Justice from using its budget to arrest or prosecute people acting in accordance with state medical marijuana laws), and a proposal to protect banks serving legal cannabis businesses were both rejected by the committee in a Wednesday session that stretched into the night. The actions mean the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer amendment, a version of which has protected MMJ patients since 2014, will not proceed as part of the spending package to a vote by the full House. The current version of the amendment is scheduled to expire at the end of September.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, the California Republican who has long championed the rights of medical marijuana patients, spent much of the past two days lobbying his fellow Republicans to support the measure. As Molly Hooper reported in The Hill earlier today:

At a Wednesday morning closed-door briefing of House Republicans, California Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R) implored his GOP colleagues to press House leaders to allow a vote on his amendment. Fellow Californian Rep. Duncan Hunter told The Hill that after Rohrabacher “talked about it this morning in conference,” GOP leaders said “it splits the conference too much so we’re not going to have a vote on it.”

Rohrabacher’s Washington Post op-ed. headlined “My fellow conservatives should protect medical marijuana from the government,” ran in the paper’s Tuesday edition. The conservative lawmaker wrote about the schism between some in his party over the issue: 

Unfortunately, my longtime friend Jeff Sessions, the attorney general, has urged Congress to drop the amendment, now co-sponsored by Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.). This, despite President Trump’s belief, made clear in his campaign and as president, that states alone should decide medical marijuana policies.

Rohrabacher followed up with an impassioned pitch to his colleagues on the House floor on Tuesday night. Without the amendment, he said, “we’re changing the status quo in a way that undermines the rights of the states and the people” to set their own cannabis policies.

There’s Still Hope

Wednesday’s vote was a setback, but it doesn’t mean the measure is dead. A version of the same MMJ protections is included in the Senate appropriations bill that was approved in July. That means the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer language might survive in the final version of the bill hammered out in a joint House-Senate reconciliation committee.

Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), the amendment’s cosponsor, noted in a tweet that a vast majority of Americans and members of Congress supported the rights of medical marijuana patients. The House Republican leadership, though, did not want the amendment to proceed to a full House vote.

What has a less chance of survival, though, are the proposals put forth by Rep. Denny Heck (D-WA) and others that would have prohibited funds from being used to penalize a financial institution for serving a legitimate marijuana business that abides by state law. 

Wednesday’s actions by the House Rules Committee left many in the legalization movement momentarily deflated, but ready to fight for the measure in reconciliation with the Senate. “Unless Congress chooses the Senate budget version, millions of seriously ill patients and the legitimate businesses that provide them with safe access to their medicine will be at risk of prosecution,” said Don Murphy, director of conservative outreach for the Marijuana Policy Project. “This vote is a slap in the face of patients, their families, their elected representatives, and the 10th Amendment.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

‘This Industry Should Be Systematically Shut Down’: The Week in Cannabis Quotes

From politics to pop culture, whether it’s good or bad, people have plenty to say about cannabis. Here’s a roundup of quotes from the past week.

“We do not want individuals prosecuted—we want the industry to be accountable. This industry—starting from the top — should be systematically shut down.”

Kevin Sabet, president of Smart Approaches to Marijuana, during a phone conference discussing the Cole Memo

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“The President has told me he is a strong supporter of medicinal marijuana. He has launched a just war on opioids which he has correctly said is the real drug abuse crisis today.”

Roger Stone, in a prepared statement in which he also apologizes for referring to a number of black Americans as “negro”

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“If I hadn’t begun self-medicating with [cannabis], I would have killed myself. The relief isn’t immediate. It doesn’t make the pain disappear. But it’s the only thing that takes the sharpest edges off my symptoms…But I live in fear that I will be arrested purchasing an illegal drug. I want safe, regulated medical cannabis to be a treatment option.”

– Thomas James Brennan, a former sergeant in the Marine Corps who wrote an op-ed for the New York Times, “Make Pot Legal for Veterans With Traumatic Brain Injury

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“People who use medical marijuana to treat arthritis are literally burning joints to soothe their burning joints.”

– a “shower thought” from reddit user furiouspasta

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“The dumbest purchase I ever made…hmm…dumbest purchase I ever made…I think it was when I bought what was supposed to be five dollars worth of pot in the village, way, way, way back, and the guy who got it for me got oregano. And I bought myself an envelope full of oregano.”

– David Crosby, founding member of both The Byrds and Crosby, Stills & Nash, during an impromptu call into The Best Show after “these pruciferous [which isn’t a word] people on Twitter” kept asking him to call in

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[The idea of legalized recreational marijuana] “makes the hair stand up on the back of my neck.”

– US Attorney General Jeff Sessions addressing an audience at the National Alliance For Drug Endangered Children in Wisconsin

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“Aren’t you the two that pulled me over before? How are you mounties now? Or should I say ‘meownties,’ heh heh.”

– Jim Gaffigan as Mr. Larry Johnson in the teaser trailer for Super Troopers 2 (okay, it’s not an explicit cannabis quote, but the first movie is enjoyed by many cannabis enthusiasts and the sequel drops on 4/20/2018)


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Texas Issues One of Three Planned Producer Licenses, But Questions Remain

Production of low-THC, high-CBD cannabis can begin in Texas, as the state’s Department of Public Safety granted one of three planned licenses to a medical marijuana producer on Friday.

The constricted medical marijuana program was created by the Texas Compassionate Use Act more than two years ago. Currently, only patients suffering from intractable epilepsy are allowed to receive low-THC cannabis with permission from a very limited number of physicians.

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Cansortium Texas, the company that received the license on Friday, will now start growing medical cannabis. Two other companies, Compassionate Cultivation and Surterra, were granted provisional licenses back in May but are still waiting on their final licenses.

Heather Fazio, Texas political director for the Marijuana Policy Project, told Leafly that it remains unclear why the other two cultivators weren’t issued final licenses today. Each of the three that were given provisional licenses had to pass onsite inspections before given a final license to start producing, so that may be a reason.

Even with the delivery of a first license, the Texas medical marijuana program still has major issues to work through.

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According to the Marijuana Policy Project, data obtained from the Texas Medical Bureau, the American Board of Psychiatry, Neurology, and the American Board of Clinical Neurophysiology indicate that only 411 doctors in Texas have the necessary qualifications to register for the program.

According to MPP, this amounts to approximately 0.54% of the licensed physicians in Texas.

The number who actually register will likely end up being lower. Some physicians may not decide to register in light of the personal and professional risk involved.

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“The few patients that could be helped by this program are now one step closer to finding relief,” Fazio said. “However, the extremely limited scope and flawed language may doom the program unless it is revised.”

So far, all attempts to fix the program have failed. Earlier this year, Rep. Eddie Lucio III introduced HB 2107, which would have resolved the problems contained in the current Compassionate Use Program.

A majority of House members signed on as supporters, but the bill did not end up getting to a floor vote before the end of the session.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

After Weeks of Waiting, Arkansas Receives MMJ Dispensary Applications

The medical marijuana system in Arkansas has been moving at a snail’s pace. After opening the door for applications to grow and dispense cannabis on June 30, the state didn’t receive a single one for a month and a half.

The silence, at least, is over. As of yesterday, two would-be dispensaries have applied for licenses, and the state Department of Health has approved nearly 800 medical marijuana registry identification cards. But according to Arkansas news website Talk Business & Politics, the commission has yet to receive any applications to grow the plant.

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Applications—the state is accepting bids for five cultivators and up to 32 dispensary operators—must be delivered to the commission by Sept. 18, at which point applicants must submit a $15,000 fee. Applicants must also provide proof of assets or a surety bond in the amount of $1 million, along with proof of at least $500,000 in liquid assets, according to Talk Business.

Despite the small number of applications received, state Rep. Doug House (R-North Little Rock) said he expects a mad rush as the deadline nears. He said he’s had conversations with several investor groups planning to seek cultivation and dispensary licenses.

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“I think there is going to be a mad rush on the last day,” House told municipal officials at the Arkansas Association of Counties (AAC) in Little Rock earlier this month.

House has been a supporter of medical marijuana bills in Arkansas. The Republican lawmaker sponsored more than 50 medical marijuana bills approved by the Legislature this spring.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

7 Companies Interested in Testing North Dakota’s Medical Marijuana

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Seven companies with experience in other states have expressed interest in testing medical marijuana in North Dakota, which is setting up a system for the drug approved by voters last year.

The response pleases state officials who were concerned about how much interest there would be among in-state labs that focus mainly on agricultural and environmental testing.

Out-of-state companies “have got some experience, the knowledge, I assume the methodology down” on testing medical marijuana for contaminants including pesticides and molds and to ensure that levels of the intoxicant THC are accurately labeled, said Kenan Bullinger, director of the Health Department’s medical marijuana division.

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The agency earlier this month sought non-binding letters of intent from laboratories so officials could gauge interest and ensure a lab would be available for testing once a system is established for making the drug legally available to qualified patients.

“We’re moving forward, probably methodically and slowly, but trying to do this as good as we can.”

Kenan Bullinger, director of Health Dept.’s MMJ division

Labs will be asked to submit formal applications later. An out-of-state company would have to set up an operation within North Dakota, since medical marijuana can’t legally be moved across state lines, Bullinger said. The lab that ultimately is chosen must be authorized by an accreditation agency.

The North Dakota Compassionate Care Act allows the use of medical marijuana for 17 medical conditions, along with terminal illnesses. Voters approved it last November and state lawmakers earlier this year crafted regulations that Gov. Doug Burgum approved in April.

The Health Department is finishing administrative rules that will cover such things as lab testing, security requirements and transportation regulations. The work is taking longer than expected, though the agency still expects medical marijuana to be available sometime next summer.

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The Health Department will register two centers to make medical marijuana and eight more to dispense it. The agency earlier this summer received nearly 100 responses when it sought letters of intent from groups and businesses interested in producing or dispensing the drug.

The formal application process will begin after the rule-making process wraps up following a public comment period, possibly sometime next month.

“We’re moving forward, probably methodically and slowly, but trying to do this as good as we can,” Bullinger said. “We want a good process in place to select the best growers, dispensers and laboratory. I think we’re on the right course.”

Activists in South Dakota are collecting signatures to put a proposed medical marijuana ballot measure to a vote next year. Supporters have said they were buoyed by the North Dakota measure’s overwhelming passage.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

American Veterinarian Group Gets Behind Cannabis Rescheduling

A leading veterinary organization is joining the fight to reschedule cannabis in an effort to speed research into the plant’s effects on our furry friends.

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The American Veterinary Medical Association (AMVA) approved a resolution at its conference last month to begin exploring how to advocate that cannabis be rescheduled federally, moving it from Schedule I to Schedule II. The move would increase opportunities to research cannabis for therapeutic use among both animals and humans.

“The House APPROVED recommending that the AVMA Board of Directors investigate working with other research organizations and medical stakeholders to reclassify cannabis from Schedule 1 to Schedule 2 to facilitate research opportunities for veterinary and human medical uses,” the organization said in a resolution posted on its website.

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Founded in 1863, the nonprofit AVMA boasts more than 89,000 members. As noted by reporter Tom Angell, who spotted the news this week, the organization “is being encouraged by its members to develop and distribute literature on marijuana’s legal status, research on its medical uses and ‘the signs, symptoms, and treatment of cannabis toxicosis in animals.’”

In a release posted on the organization’s website, Dr. Michael Ames, an Arizona veterinarian, pointed out that even though cannabis is legal for medical use among humans in 29 states, it’s still illegal at the federal level, which means vets aren’t legally able to prescribe medical marijuana to animals.

Currently, the Colorado State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Science is conducting two clinical trials examining the effects of cannabis in dogs. One study is exploring CBD’s effects on canine epilepsy, while the other is looking at CBD as a possible osteoarthritis treatment.

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CSU is still recruiting animals for the study.

Other vets are calling for more research in order to better understand possible health risks to animals, which can be affected by cannabis more severely than humans. Dr. Dick Sullivan of California said at the Veterinary Information Forum on July 20. “We are definitely seeing an increase in toxicity cases. For that reason alone, we need research and our national association to write a letter or petition the FDA to allow us to do research and get good information to our clients because they are asking us, and our obligation, morally and ethically, is to address these cases.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Government Will Provide Patients With CBD Products for Treatment in Mexico

This article is sponsored by CMW Media, the premier public and media relations agency proudly serving the cannabis industry worldwide.  


Medical Marijuana, Inc., the first publicly traded cannabis company in the United States, will provide the government of the State of Mexico with medical-grade CBD hemp oil products from its subsidiary HempMeds Mexico®, which will be used in the treatment of patients suffering from a variety of conditions including refractory epilepsy and Lennox Gastaut-Syndrome.

The deal marks the first time a government in Mexico has purchased CBD products for its citizens, and follows a series of steps in Mexico’s courts and legislature that have made CBD products more accessible to patients. These include the approval of CBD products from HempMeds Mexico by the Mexican health ministry COFEPRIS.

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Mexico is just the latest nation in Latin America to make it easier for patients to integrate CBD products into their healthcare regimens. Since 2015, similar steps have been taken by the governments of Brazil and Paraguay. 

The State of Mexico’s Governor Eruviel Avila Villegas distributed HempMeds Mexico’s flagship product Real Scientific Hemp Oil-X™ (RSHO-X™), a CBD hemp oil containing zero THC, to patients during the opening of a new clinic in the Mexico City suburb of Ecatepec. Avila was joined at the event by Mexican cannabis activist Raul Elizalde and César Nomar Gómez Monge, Health Minister of the State of Mexico.

The State of Mexico’s Health Minister, César Nomar Gómez Monge, speaks on the potential treatment value of CBD for epilepsy patients. (Moises Ramirez)

“We want to congratulate the State of Mexico’s government for this historic purchase of our CBD products to help relieve the suffering of its citizens,” said Medical Marijuana, Inc. president and CEO Dr. Stuart Titus.  

“We are a company of firsts, and this is another first. We are excited to achieve the historic milestone of having the Mexican government purchase our CBD products to benefit its citizens. The plethora of benefits of medical cannabis in treating several types of indications is undeniable, and we are encouraged to see not only healthcare professionals, [but] now also governments, become increasingly interested in how CBD hemp oil can help heal.”

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Paraguay Grants Historic Import Permit to CBD Hemp Oil RSHO as Medication for Epilepsy

Epilepsy is among the many indications that can benefit from medical marijuana products. A new study led by Dr. Saul Garza Morales, a pediatric researcher and neurologist in Mexico, helps expand on that body of work.

Recently, Dr. Garza Morales shared the positive results of a recent study he conducted on the effects of Medical Marijuana, Inc.’s RSHO-X™ product in treating children with severe epilepsy. Dr. Garza and his collaborators found that 86% of the 38 patients included in the study saw the frequency of their motor seizures cut in half. Five subjects were even totally seizure-free for four full months, a result that is usually only achieved following major surgeries.

“With the advent of RSHO-X therapy, doctors have a new approach—using natural CBD in its natural, botanical form,” said Dr. Garza. “This has shown to control seizure episodes in epilepsy children to a significant degree, meaning invasive surgeries are now a resort of last measure.” 


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.