Tag: medical marijuana

Peru Approves Medical Cannabis Legalization Bill

After intense debate, the Peruvian Congress voted to legalize cannabis for medical use. The bill must be approved by President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski before it becomes law.

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Legislative Bill 1393, which passed on a 67–5 vote with three members abstaining—was proposed by lawmaker Alberto de Belaunde. The measure would allow the cultivation and storage of medicinal cannabis products with oversight by a regulatory committee made up of the Ministries of Agriculture and Health, the National Commission for Development and Life Without Drugs (DEVIDA), as well as an appointed panel of cannabis experts.

The bill was introduced over the summer along with two other bills to legalize cannabis for medicinal use. It was pitched as a solution for suffering patients after law enforcement raided a community cannabis cultivation site last February. Ana Alvarez, a cannabis advocate and founder of the association Buscando Esperanza, had been illegally producing cannabis oil to treat her son Anthony, who suffers from severe seizure disorder Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, when the family’s home was raided.

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Alvarez criticized another bill introduced by the executive branch that would have allowed the importation and sales of medical cannabis products, pointing out that it would be costly and inefficient to import expensive products from abroad, rather than allowing cultivation within Peru’s borders.

“Mothers are happy because it is already a step forward in this long journey. We expect self-cultivation to be allowed,” Alvarez said in support of the bill. “The import offers very high prices that would affect low-income families.”

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After being approved by the Health Committee on Oct. 11, Committee President and Congressman Eloy Narváez spoke out in favor of the measure. Defense Commission President Javier Velásquez Quesquén supported the measure in September, indicating that the cultivation and production must first be authorized by the executive branch through such institutions as authorized laboratories and the National Institute of Health.

The law will allow residents with certain qualifying conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease, cancer, and epilepsy, to use cannabis and its derivatives as part of a course of treatment. Belaunde said that regulations for the production of medicinal cannabis oil will be drafted within the next 60 days if approved by President Kuczynsnki.

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Kuczynski has been generally supportive of cannabis in the past, saying “Si quieren fumar su troncho no es el fin del mondo,” or “If they want to smoke [in moderate doses], it’s not the end of the world.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Australian Universities Receive $2.5 Million for Cannabis Research

The National Health and Medical Research Council gave Australian cannabis research a major shot in the arm this week, with the council awarding the research body $2.5 million for research.

The funds will be used to establish the Australian Centre for Cannabinoid Clinical and Research Excellence (ACRE), a national center to coordinate research into medicinal cannabis use. ACRE will focus on investigating quality and safety issues, including growing methods and safe formulation of plant material into medicines, and will eventually develop clinical trials.

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Researchers and clinicians from all over Australia will be involved in the national effort, which will be based at the University of Newcastle and University of Wollongong.

Federal funding for the new center was announced by Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt on Oct. 11.

In Australia, access to cannabinoids for medicinal purposes have been difficult due to restrictive licencing and import laws, along with a lack of ready-to-prescribe cannabis-based medicines for specific medical conditions.  ACRE hopes to change that.

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The center will be co-led by University of Newcastle professor Jenny Martin and professor Nadia Solowij of the University of Wollongong School of Psychology and the Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute. Together, the two aim to make Australia’s eastern seaboard a hub for cannabis research.

“In many Australian states, people can now access cannabinoids for medicinal purposes under the supervision of a medical specialist, but it can be difficult to source reliable, consistent and suitable products that are known to be safe and effective for specific conditions,” Martin said.

“Recent legislation has improved the situation,” she added, “but appropriate research is needed to enable evidence to guide doctors on products and dosages that are safe and effective.”

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ACRE will undertake medical cannabinoid research, consolidate existing data into guidance, and link health outcomes from people currently accessing local and imported products to guide plant growing and product formulation into appropriate medicines, according to a press release.

The center’s investigators will link scientific research teams with specialist and national primary health care infrastructure to support information sharing, national monitoring, and linkage with government. They’ll also be training a new medical research workforce in the field and conducting basic research leading to clinical trials.

“At this critical juncture, where legislation around cannabis and cannabinoids is rapidly changing in Australia and worldwide, there is tremendous opportunity for Australia to establish world leadership in cautious and appropriately balanced management of the implementation of medicinal cannabinoids into specialist and primary health care settings,” Solowij said.

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The announcement comes as New South Wales’ conservative government has taken a hard stance on cannabis, moving to block laws decriminalizing possession of small amounts of cannabis for those suffering from serious medical conditions.

Despite the government’s stance, NSW is becoming one of the greenest states in Australia, attracting significant investment in medical cannabis industry and research. Already home to the $33.7 million Lambert Initiative at the University of Sydney, the state also recently attracted an enormous investment from Canadian firm PUF to build the largest legal cannabis facility in the southern hemisphere.

As the economic, technological, and medical benefits of becoming a hub for medical cannabis start to flow in, the NSW government may find it more difficult to maintain its hard-line stance cannabis.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

In Surprise Move, Justice Dept. Stands Down on ‘Kettle Falls Five’ Case

The US Department of Justice (DOJ) filed an unusual motion yesterday to stay a notorious federal medical marijuana case in northeastern Washington state, which it has vigorously prosecuted since 2012. After pursuing the case for five years, Justice Department officials yesterday acknowledged that they were prohibited by law from spending money to prosecute the case after Congress passed the Rohrabacher-Farr budget amendment in 2014.

Justice Dept. officials acknowledged that federal law prevented them from pursuing the case after 2014.

Joseph H. Harrington, acting US Attorney for the Eastern District of Washington, filed the motion to stay the appeal of convictions against a family of medical marijuana patients who became widely known as the “Kettle Falls Five.”

Three family members with a medical marijuana garden near Kettle Falls, Washington—Rhonda Firestack-Harvey, her son Rolland Gregg, and his wife Michelle Gregg—were acquitted on almost all federal charges in a March 2015 jury trial, but each was convicted of a single federal charge of cannabis cultivation.

Roland Gregg was sentenced to 33 months in prison, while Firestack-Harvey and Michelle Gregg were sentenced to a year and a day each. Another defendant, Jason Zucker, accepted a plea bargain that included testifying against his co-defendants. He received a 16 month prison sentence. The fifth defendant, Firestack-Harvey’s husband Larry Harvey, who was dismissed from the case after prosecutors discovered he was suffering from terminal cancer, died in August 2015.

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Vindication Came Too Late for Larry

Firestack-Harvey and the Greggs appealed their convictions, based partly on the argument that the prosecution was in violation of the Rohrabacher-Farr amendment, which prevents the Justice Department from spending money to prevent states where medical marijuana is legal from “implementing their own State laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession, or cultivation of medical marijuana.”

In this Thursday, May 8, 2014 photo, from left, Larry Harvey, Rhonda Firestack-Harvey, and Rolland Gregg stand in the plaza in front of the federal courthouse in Spokane, Wash. The three were charged with growing medical cannabis at their remote farm near Kettle Falls, Wash. Larry Harvey died of cancer in 2015. (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios)

The amendment, adoped in 2014, was named after the House members who authored it, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) and Sam Farr (D-CA), and it must be re-authorized every year or two. Since Rep. Farr retired, the measure has been renamed the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer amendment (after new co-sponsor, Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR)), and is next up for renewal in early December.

Justice Department officials pursued the case because, they argued, law enforcement officials believed the family was using Washington state’s medical marijuana law as cover for an illegal marijuana distribution operation.

It’s unclear why the Justice Department has now changed its tune.

Instead of continuing to vigorously fight the appeal, Harrington yesterday asked the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit to remand the case back to the trial court because “the United States was not authorized to spend money on the continued prosecution of the defendants after December 2014,” including “spending money on the present appeal.”

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The Original Raid Happened in 2012

The Kettle Falls Five case stemmed from a raid on the defendants’ property in 2012. Although they were not in violation of state law—all family members were collectively growing a quantity of plants allowed by Washington State—the DOJ used an accumulated number of plants from prior cultivation seasons to charge the family more harshly and to argue that they were violating state law.

The Kettle Falls Five case gained national attention and was an impetus for Congress to consider a funding ban against medical marijuana prosecutions such as theirs. In the months before he died, Larry Harvey made multiple trips to Washington, DC, to lobby Congress on the measure. The Rohrabacher-Farr measure, which was attached to a spending bill, had been introduced in previous years, but was somewhat unexpectedly adopted by a significant margin in 2014.

“For over five years, the federal government wasted taxpayer money prosecuting a family that had fully complied with state laws,” said Phil Telfeyan, Executive Director of Equal Justice Under Law, the DC-based nonprofit law firm representing the family. “The feds have finally admitted that the family never should have been prosecuted in the first place, but there is no way they can get those five years of their lives back.”

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DOJ Used a Narrow Reading

In August 2016, while the DOJ was spending taxpayer money to fight the Kettle Falls Five appeal, the Ninth Circuit dealt a blow to that effort. In the case United States v. McIntosh, a composite of cases from various districts on appeal to the Ninth Circuit, the DOJ had argued that the Rohrabacher-Farr amendment applied only to litigation against the states themselves, and not to the prosecution of individuals who grow or distribute marijuana for medical use.

Justice Dept. officials claimed Rohrabacher-Farr applied only to litigation against states, not growers or patients.

Rejecting that interpretation, the Ninth Circuit ruled the amendment prevents the DOJ from prosecuting marijuana providers who “fully comply” with state marijuana laws. The Ninth Circuit further ruled that federal defendants are entitled to evidentiary hearings to show whether their actions were in compliance with state law.

In May, US Attorney General Jeff Sessions asked Congress to undo federal marijuana protections like the Rohrabacher-Farr amendment, saying that such protections “inhibit” and “thwart” the DOJ from enforcing the Controlled Substances Act. Sessions found an ally in Rep. Pete Sessions (R-TX, and no relation), chairman of the House Rules Committee, who successfully cut Rohrabacher-Blumenauer from the budget bill making its way through the House in September. President Trump’s surprise budget deal with Senate Democrats, however, thwarted the Sessions effort to kill Rohrabacher-Blumenauer, and the patient protections survived for another few months.

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The federal government’s current budget, and the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer protections, are scheduled to expire on December 8, 2017.

Telfeyan called yesterday’s DOJ filing a victory for the family and lawful medical marijuana patients all across the country. “Our government should not use federal money to prosecute people abiding by state laws,” he said in a prepared statement.

Firestack-Harvey and the Greggs have been out of prison the entire time, pending their appeal.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Michigan Update: Mad Dash for Licenses, NMU Launches Cannabis Program

Michigan officials are gearing up for a mad rush on Dec. 15, the first day cannabis business-license applications become available in the state. The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs will be releasing applications for all five categories of the state’s medical cannabis industry, including cultivation, processing, testing, transportation, and sales.

Nearly a thousand would-be business operators have signed up for state-run training sessions, Shelly Edgerton, director of the state’s licensing department, told a crowd in Ann Arbor, according to the Detroit Free Press. “We may have 50. We may have 1,500. We may have 5,000,” she said.

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Attendees of the Ann Arbor training session had a host of questions about application details, the Free Press reported, ranging from licensing-related costs to how the state will accept tax payments. Offices in other states have been overwhelmed as cannabis operators, largely unable to get comprehensive banking services, deliver thousands of dollars in cash.

Dispensaries have been operating in a kind of gray area in Michigan for several years. Medical marijuana became legal in 2008, but no statewide licensing program existed at the time.

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The shift to a state-regulated industry could cause some hiccups. Some lawmakers have called for dispensaries to shut down on Dec. 15, reopening only once they receive a state licenses. Others worry that could interrupt access to medicine for cannabis patients. State lawmakers in both the House and Senate have introduced bills that would allow dispensaries to stay open during the transition period.

The state was home to 218,556 registered patients as of late 2016, according to the most recent available state data. Here at Leafly, we estimate that number has grown roughly 10% during 2017, putting the number of current patients at around 240,000.

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Northern Michigan University to Offer Cannabis Degree

The largest university in Upper Peninsula is offering a degree in cannabis. Northern Michigan University in Marquette began its medical plant chemistry program this semester. The program, which boasts about a dozen students in the first class, according to the Detroit Free Press, combines chemistry, biology, botany, horticulture, marketing, and finance.

It’s designed to give students a more traditional approach to cannabis education than niche programs at schools like Oaksterdam University or Humboldt Cannabis College. Students at NMU, the school says, will benefit from a traditional, four-year college experience and also addresses the science and business of growing cannabis.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Colorado Hits Billion Dollar Sales Mark in Nine Months

According to data from the Colorado Department of Revenue, the Rocky Mountain state sold over $1 billion dollars in cannabis through the first nine months of 2017.

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It took the state 10 months to reach the billion dollar mark in 2016. Sales totals through the first nine months of this year have reached a total of about $1.1 billion—the highest amount of total sales to date in the country.

When comparing the data to last year, through 9 months of sales Leafly found that Colorado totaled $942 million, with the totals in 2017 so far showing there was over a $100 million dollar increase in sales from the same time period, totaling $1,118,207,832.87 in sales.

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Through the first nine months of 2017, Colorado has seen a fairly steady increase from the year prior, with the state routinely breaking its total sales record in the past 6 months–first in March, and then in July, when the state totaled more than $136 million in total cannabis sales, when combining adult-use sales and medicinal marijuana sales.

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The state initiated a different taxing structure in July 2017, with the special sales tax rate for recreational marijuana sales increasing from 10% to 15%. The new law exempted adult-use cannabis sales from the 2.9% standard state sales tax rate.

Medical marijuana and accessories are still subject to that 2.9% special sales tax rate, however.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Congressman Earl Blumenauer: Medical Marijuana Is Safer Than Opioids

Congressman Earl Blumenauer: Medical Marijuana Is Safer Than Opioids | Justin Strekal

On Wednesday, October 11th, Congressional Cannabis Caucus Co-Chair Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) testified before the House Energy & Commerce Subcommittee on Health on how to deal with the opioid crisis in America. In his testimony, the Congressman makes the case for medical cannabis as a safer alternative to highly addictive opioids, especially for our veterans—as well […]

Congressman Earl Blumenauer: Medical Marijuana Is Safer Than Opioids | The Daily Chronic


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Quebec Police Continue Zero-Tolerance Policy for Medical Dispensaries

Quebec remains quick and punishing in its response to those trying to sell medical cannabis in the province.

In August of 2016, Quebec City police swooped in to close Weeds: Herbes et curiosités, the city’s first medical dispensary, after only two months of operation. In January of this year, Marc Emery, the self-appointed “Prince of Pot,” tried opening five locations of his Cannabis Culture chain in Montreal. They were shut down in two days. Around the same time, Quebec City police shut down “therapeutic dispensary” la Croix-Verte after four months of operation.

“It’s very clear. There will be no sale of cannabis tolerated in our territory so long as the law is as it is presently.”

Constable David Poitras, spokesperson for the Service de Police de la Ville du Québec

Quebec police are not forgiving of law-flouting dispensaries. Never mind that cannabis will be recreationally legal in nine months, or that wide use of cannabis in places where it’s been recreationally legalized appears to show no ill social effects. It’s against the law, and the law is the only thing Quebec police care about.

Quebec City’s most recent medical dispensary, Cannoisseur, learned that lesson first-hand when it was raided in early October, after four months in operation in the city’s downtown core. A manager was arrested for trafficking in narcotics.

“This is the third business to be established in Quebec City and is the third business where there has been a raid,” said Constable David Poitras, spokesperson for the Service de Police de la Ville du Québec, in an interview with Radio-Canada. “So in Quebec City, at the level of the police department, it’s zero tolerance for this type of trade.”

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Poitras held forth further in an interview with La Presse: “It’s very clear. There will be no sale of cannabis tolerated in our territory so long as the law is as it is presently, which is to say that cannabis is illegal. This was a business that was openly advertised as a dispensary for the sale of cannabis. our investigation showed that no authorization was promulgated by Health Canada and that trade was therefore illegal.”

The members-only dispensary required two pieces of ID, a medication history, and a questionnaire about diagnosis, psychiatric or psychological problems, and personal history with cannabis consumption—all before customers were allowed to pass through a locked door to the room where the cannabis products were kept. Members were required to sign a “terms and conditions” form acknowledging that they understood cannabis was a controlled substance and subject to Canadian federal law, and accepting the risk associated with cannabis possession and consumption. However, a formal medical record was not required.

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Marc-Antoine Hamel, one of Cannoisseur’s three owners, told Le Soleil two weeks ago, “We’re going to try not to do what the other stores did, which is to say close. We’ve really organized ourselves with the city, the police, and two law firms so that we stay open. It’s complicated, but we’ve agreed to ensure that we respect the law.”

Unlike Weeds: Herbes et curiosités, Cannoisseur took pains not to show the available cannabis products to non-members. “We didn’t want to do like Weeds, where you came in and you could see the products, that’s illegal,” Hamel told Le Soleil, adding that la Croix-Verte was shut down for not following the law as well, so Cannoisseur’s goal was to work with criminal lawyers in order to make sure they did things right.

Hamel claimed that Cannoisseur’s owners respected the law and had no wish to break it. “We are fully prepared to work with municipal and police authorities to ensure no one can doubt the legality and legitimacy of our business approach,” he said.

Quebec’s medical cannabis is the most tightly regulated in the country, requiring doctors first to prescribe aggressive synthetic cannabinoids.

However, Cyndi Paré, spokesperson for Quebec police, said at the time that the police force made no agreement with any “marijuana dispensary.” She added that all production, distribution, and sale of cannabis remained illegal unless accredited by Health Canada. “A single producer in Quebec, Hyropothecary de Gatineau, has so far received Health Canada accreditation,” Paré said.

Quebec’s medical cannabis is the most tightly regulated in the country, requiring doctors first to prescribe aggressive synthetic cannabinoids, and then to perform a complete medical assessment on any patient who finds their needs are not met by pharmaceutical synthetics. The guidelines for prescribing cannabis from the Collège des médecins du Québec (Quebec College of Physicians) note that “[t]he use of cannabis for medical purposes is not a recognized treatment” and “an unrecognized treatment can only be used within a research framework.”

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Upon receiving a prescription for medical cannabis, patients are also put onto the Quebec Cannabis Registry and their user-data is contributed to medical research by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and the Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids. The Registry is mandatory: Patients cannot opt out.

In a post two hours after the raid, the Cannoisseur Facebook page shared an article about the raid with the heading, “On break for the day.” A follow up comment from the page owners read, “Police gonna police! We back soon.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Study: Cannabis May Be Protective Against Liver Disease

Study: Cannabis May Be Protective Against Liver Disease | NORML

MARSEILLE, FRANCE — Cannabis may be protective against liver disease in subjects infected with both the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), according to data published online ahead of print in the Journal of Viral Hepatitis. French investigators assessed the relationship between cannabis use and the prevalence of steatosis (fatty liver disease) in a […]

Study: Cannabis May Be Protective Against Liver Disease | The Daily Chronic


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Blumenauer Calls for Cannabis Research to Combat Opioid Crisis

Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) has made it a hallmark of his career to speak up for medical cannabis, legalization, and the transformative effect reform could have on the United States. He consistently introduces and cosponsors bills to legalize cannabis federally, as well as many efforts to improve the legal marijuana markets already in place.

His latest remarks took place on the floor of the US House Committee on Energy and Commerce. The topic was the opioid epidemic, and when Blumenauer took the floor, clad in his signature bowtie, a bicycle pin peering out from the label of his blazer, he didn’t mince words.

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“I appreciate the focus on the opioid crisis that grips every community, to some degree, and affects every state. Especially critical for our veterans, who are twice as likely to die of accidental overdose. As we’re slowly acknowledging the depths of the opioid crisis, which is good, we seldom acknowledge one of the simplest, most effective solutions: medical marijuana, cannabis. Now available in 28 states, largely driven by the voters,” he said, gesturing emphatically to drive the point home. “Not the politicians.”

He distributed a one-sheet page of information, complete with sources cited, to the members of the committee, entitled “Physician Guide to Cannabis-Assisted Opioid Reduction,” referencing how cannabis can reduce opioid overdose deaths, can reduce opioid consumption in general, and can help prevent dose escalation, as well as the development of an opioid tolerance.

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He paused and looked up to address the floor. “Mr. Chairman, we don’t talk much about this, although repeatedly on the floor over the last three years, Congress has been moving in this direction, and voted, last Congress to have the Veteran’s Administration be able to work with veterans in states where medical marijuana is legal.”

“But I focus on just one, simple item. Not the facts,” he patted the large packet of paper on the desk in front of him, “which I hope this committee would look at,” he added.

He was referring to a piece of legislation he recently introduced with a very odd bedfellow for a cannabis bill, Rep. Andy Harris (R-MD). Rep. Harris, in the past, has been far from a cannabis advocate; in fact, he was deemed quite the opposite in years past. When the District of Columbia legalized cannabis for adult use, he fought against legal retail cannabis stores, and against cannabis social clubs.

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“There’s one piece of legislation that I’ve introduced with Dr. Andy Harris, someone who doesn’t agree with me about the efficacy of medical marijuana,” Rep. Blumenauer was quick to admit. “But he strongly agrees with me that there’s no longer any reason for the federal government to interfere with research to be able to prove it.”

Their newly introduced bipartisan legislation, House Resolution 3391, would cut through the bureaucratic red tape on federally funded cannabis research by amending the Controlled Substances Act to make marijuana more easily accessible to medical researchers.

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“The federal government has a stranglehold on this research,” Blumenauer explained. “We have bipartisan legislation, which would break that stranglehold and be able to have robust research to resolve these questions so there would no longer be any doubt.”

He finished his remarks with a final, impassioned plea. “This is the cheapest, most effective way to stop the crisis. Where people have access to medical marijuana, there are fewer overdoses, and people opt for it daily with chronic pain,” he implored. “I would appreciate the subcommittee looking at this issue as your time permits.”

Physician Guide to Cannabis-Assisted Opioid Reduction (Distributed by EB) by Lisa Rough on Scribd


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Data Dive: Breaking Down Maryland’s Medical Cannabis Industry By Race & Gender

It’s been a long, bumpy road for Maryland’s medical marijuana program, which voters first approved back in 2013.

Access to medical cannabis has been delayed by disputes over how the state awards its dispensary, cultivator, and processor licenses. Some of the potential licensees sued the state and the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission (MMCC) because, according to the potential licensees, MMCC officials did not consider the racial diversity of the applicants, as is required under the original law.

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That law was aimed at boosting minority-owned business participation in the state’s developing industry. Historically, people of color have been far more greatly harmed by the war on drugs than white people; yet the owners of cannabis business licenses in America’s emerging legal industry tend to be far more white and male than the population at large.

In Maryland, state courts are currently reviewing two separate cases alleging that state regulators improperly picked grow license winners.

One of the unique aspects of Maryland’s medical marijuana law is a requirement to report and post data on the race, ethnicity, and gender of cannabis business owners and employees. Leafly has translated that data into a number of graphs, below, that give a bit of insight into how the state is doing with its allocation of licenses. For context, the population of Maryland is about 58% white and 42% minority.

According to the data, white men are the most likely demographic group to own a state-licensed cannabis grow operation. As the data point out, only 15% of grow operations are owned by minorities, and 23% are owned by women.

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There’s a similar divide among cannabis processors: 27% are owned by women, and 27% are owned by minority entrepreneurs.

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Among dispensary owners, the numbers break about 60% male, 40% female.

Here’s a look at the Maryland medical marijuana industry as a whole:


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.