Tag: Medical

Growing Demand Drives Flurry of Aussie–Israeli Cannabis Partnerships

An Israeli company will partner with an Australian one to help boost clinical education opportunities around medical cannabis. The two companies, iCAN: Israel-Cannabis and Melbourne-based LeafCann have announced a joint-venture to collaborate on a range of initiatives including medicinal cannabis research, product development, and education.

The venture will be called iCAN: Australia, and, according to LeafCann Group CEO Jaroslav Boublik, the companies will “develop global clinical education initiatives to bridge the gap between public demand and practitioner education.”

Despite significant interest in medical cannabis in Australia, a slow rollout and onerous application process has frustrated patients seeking access to treatment. Nationwide, only 41 patients in the country have been prescribed medical cannabis through an authorized prescriber.

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With the move, LeafCann becomes the latest of several Australian medical cannabis companies to partner with Israeli firms and researchers. MMJ Phytotech has a license agreement with the Israeli Yissum Research Development Co. as well as research links with Hadassah University Hospital in Jerusalem. And on the education front, the Israeli cannabis start-up accelerator Cann10 recently announced that it will be running Australia’s first medical school course on cannabis at Deakin University.

For iCAN: Australia’s part, the joint venture will develop educational programs within Australia’s Registered Training Organisation framework. According to an iCAN spokesperson, that means it will be eligible for healthcare workers’ required continuing professional development credits, will be endorsed by medical colleges and the government, and will also be tax deductible for medical professionals to attend.

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The programs, meant to address what’s seen as dearth of formal medical cannabis education opportunities in the country, “are designed by highly credentialed medical educators and will provide training that contributes to recognised professional certification and diplomas for Medical Practitioners including GPs, specialists, nurse practitioners, nurses, aged care workers and pharmacists,” spokesperson Daniel Goldstein said in a statement. “We will look to take this curriculum outside of Australia as well and become qualified for continuing education credits in different geographies.”

Education is just one focus of the partnership, which will also “bring world-class cannabis products to the Australian market” according to Saul Kaye, CEO of iCAN: Israel-Cannabis. That’s about as specific as the companies have been on the product front. The joint venture has tight-lipped so far, saying only that “Our products will cover a range of indications and are being prioritized according to the state of the clinical science, critical demand and regulatory limitations.”

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Although it isn’t growing cannabis yet, the Australian half of the partnership, LeafCann, has already submitted licences for cultivation, manufacturing and R&D in Victoria, and it plans to seek licenses for further operations in Tasmania. If Australia decides to allow medical cannabis exports—as the Office of Drug Control has signaled it will—the joint venture will look to offer its products globally.

As regulations settle and ease in Australia, partnerships like that of iCAN: Australia are likely to become more common as companies in Israel, a cannabis R&D leader, aims to capitalize on a growing industry in Australia. In update delivered last week, Bill Turner, the head of Australia’s Office of Drug Control, said that 90 manufacturing and processing license applications had been received. Although the government has been accepting applications since November 2016, almost a third of all applications received so far have been submitted in the past month and a half.

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The crush of activity suggests that despite ongoing regulatory uncertainty and the volatility of cannabis penny stocks, the Australian medical cannabis industry is still attracting eager investment.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Utah Group Files 2018 Medical Marijuana Ballot Initiative

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Activists who say they are tired of waiting for Utah’s conservative Legislature to pass a broad medical marijuana law launched an effort Monday to ask voters next year to pass the law, a move that would bypass state lawmakers.

People with chronic, painful conditions who want to use cannabis legally in the state plus other members of a group called the Utah Patients Coalition said lawmakers’ rejection of broad medical marijuana laws for three years in a row prompted their ballot initiative drive.

“The time has come to help alleviate the pain and suffering of the most vulnerable in our society, with the help of a medicine that works for them,” said Utah Patients Coalition director DJ Schanz.

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Utah passed an extremely limited medical marijuana law several years ago that allows those with severe epilepsy to use a cannabis extract called cannabidiol if they obtain it from other states. Lawmakers and Utah’s Republican Gov. Gary Herbert have said they worry a broader medical marijuana law could lead to prescriptions filled for people who feign illness so they can get the drug and use it recreationally.

“We took him to every doctor. We were given every pharmaceutical and nothing helped.”

Desiree Hennessy, parent

The Utah Patients Coalition wants Utah to join 29 other states, the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico in allowing broader medical use of marijuana with dispensaries, different plant strains and methods of consuming it.

Schanz spoke with reporters at the state Capitol as about 40 people held signs that read “Cancer” and “Epilepsy.” Among the group were parents with children in wheelchairs and therapy dogs. Another attendee was former state Sen. Mark Madsen, a Republican who unsuccessfully tried to get a medical cannabis bill passed before he retired from the Legislature last year.

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Madsen, who has spoken in the past of his back pain, opiate overdose and use of marijuana, stood nearby holding a sign that read “chronic pain.”

Desiree Hennessy, a backer of the initiative from the small northern Utah town of Avon, wants to try to use cannabis to alleviate the suffering of her 23-year-old son Hestevan Hennessy, who has cerebral palsy, nerve pain and other conditions that leave him screaming in agonizing pain.

Desiree Hennessy cries during the Utah Patients Coalition news conference at the Utah State Capitol Monday, June 26, 2017, in Salt Lake City. A group of activists and Utah residents with chronic conditions has launched a ballot initiative to ask voters next year to pass a broad medical marijuana law. Her adopted son Hestevan has cerebral palsy and suffers from chronic nerve pain, seizure disorder, and life-threatening complications from his medication. (Rick Bowmer/AP)Desiree Hennessy cries during the Utah Patients Coalition news conference at the Utah State Capitol Monday, June 26, 2017, in Salt Lake City. A group of activists and Utah residents with chronic conditions has launched a ballot initiative to ask voters next year to pass a broad medical marijuana law. Her adopted son Hestevan has cerebral palsy and suffers from chronic nerve pain, seizure disorder, and life-threatening complications from his medication. (Rick Bowmer/AP)

“We took him to every doctor. We were given every pharmaceutical and nothing helped,” said Hennessy, who stopped to cry as she spoke about her son, who sat nearby in a wheelchair softly moaning.

Candi Huff of the Salt Lake City suburb of Draper spoke about her 18-year-old daughter Madison Huff, whose epilepsy has not responded to medications. Huff said her daughter began using cannabidiol several years ago under Utah’s limited law and her seizures eased, but she wants her daughter to be able to try other versions of cannabis to determine whether it will help reduce the seizures more.

Huff, who is also the president of the Epilepsy Association of Utah, said other Utah residents with epilepsy who have not found cannabidiol effective and go to other states to get marijuana where it is legal for medicinal purposes.

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Utah only allows patients to use cannabidiol if they receive approval from the state health department after demonstrating that at least three other methods of treatment have not helped.

The medical marijuana law proposed by the ballot initiative would set up state-regulated cannabis growing and dispensing operations. It would allow the drug to be consumed in edible forms like candy, in topical forms like lotions or balms, as an oil or in electronic cigarettes.

Smoking cannabis would not be allowed in a tactical political move that the organizers said represented a compromise to try to make the initiative more palatable for voters.

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Utah Medical Association CEO Michelle McOmber said her organization has concerns about the initiative and plants to speak out against it as the effort moves forward.

“That’s not that way that you determine what is medicine,” McOmber said.

Utah Patients Coalition filed the ballot initiative with the state elections office and hopes to start gathering 115,000 voter signatures this summer needed to qualify the issue to be put before voters on ballots.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Koch Network Warns Trump Against ‘Failed’ Cannabis Fight

The conservative Koch political network is coming out hard against the Trump administration’s plan to step up enforcement of the nation’s cannabis laws, joining a growing group on the political right who are urging the president to push back against drug war hardliners like Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

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“You are never going to win the war on drugs. Drugs won,” Mark Holden, one of the influential network’s top leaders, told reporters in Colorado Springs, according to the Denver Post. His statements  came as the network opened a three-day retreat at The Broadmoor resort in Colorado Springs.

Holden, the general counsel for Koch Industries—the second-largest privately owned company in the  US—said the network has disagreed with Sessions’s decision to re-evaluate a federal policy not to interfere in state medical marijuana systems and taken issue with the attorney general’s request that Congress lift restrictions to allow the justice department to crack down on state-legal medical programs.

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“I’m not here to say our position is legalize drugs or anything else,” Holden said. “But I don’t think that we should criminalize those types of things, and we should let the states decide.”

In a letter sent in May and made public earlier this month, Sessions urged Congress to roll back a protection known as the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer amendment, which prohibits the Justice Department from using federal funds to prevent certain states “from implementing their own state laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession, or cultivation of medical marijuana.” The rule has stymied at least one high-profile case against a California cannabis business.

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While he cautioned against reading too much into the network’s stance, Holden, according to the Post, told reporters that medical marijuana should be “off-limits” to federal law enforcement.

Charles and David Koch have spent millions to further their conservative political goals. Holden, who is currently in charge of a network-backed effort to address overcriminalization and criminal justice reform, said federal cannabis enforcement is another example of a “failed big government top-down approach.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

California Lawmakers to Consider Cannabis Rules Thursday

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California would set standards for organic marijuana, allow samples at county fairs and permit home deliveries under legislation set to be considered by lawmakers Thursday as the state prepares for next year’s start of legal marijuana sales.

Lawmakers and Gov. Jerry Brown’s administration are working to merge California’s new voter-approved adult-use cannabis law with the state’s longstanding medical marijuana program. They have settled on an array of regulations to protect consumers and public safety while ensuring taxes are collected.

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The provisions were tucked into the state budget agreement between Brown and top legislative Democrats announced this week following months of negotiations with businesses operating illegally or in the legal medical marijuana field and investors who want to enter the nation’s largest legal marijuana market.

“One of the biggest challenges we have is taking a multi-billion-dollar industry out of the dark and now into the light,” said Sen. Mike McGuire, a Democrat whose district includes much of Northern California’s prime marijuana growing region.

By 2018, state officials must have crafted regulations and rules governing the emerging legal marijuana market with an estimated annual sales value of $7 billion — ranging from where and how plants can be grown to setting guidelines to track the buds from fields to stores. Full legal sales are expected to roll out later in the year.

“There are thousands of businesses currently engaged in this type of commerce.”

Hezekiah Allen , California Growers Association

In general, the state will treat cannabis like alcohol, allowing people 21 and older to legally possess up to an ounce of marijuana and grow six marijuana plants at home.

The budget agreement includes $118 million to pay for startup costs for the newly regulated industry, including technology and staff to work on regulations and issue licenses. The state will open a tax office in the remote region north of San Francisco so marijuana businesses can pay their taxes in cash without having to drive long distances with thousands of dollars.

Because marijuana remains illegal under federal law, cannabis businesses generally cannot open bank accounts, conduct credit card transactions or otherwise use the federally regulated banking system.

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The legislation outlines baseline rules for marijuana businesses and was crafted to promote a new artisanal industry in a state that has embraced craft beer and small wineries.

It would require state regulators to come up with rules for marijuana producers to call their goods organic — an important designation for California consumers that cannot be used on cannabis under federal rules. The state would also create standards for official marijuana varietals and growing regions, known as appellations, so craft producers can distinguish their products based on the unique strain and growing conditions like winemakers do.

With temporary licenses from the state, businesses would be allowed to sell cannabis and provide samples at county fairs, regional agricultural associations and cannabis festivals.

Growers would be allowed to form agricultural cooperatives without running afoul of antitrust laws. Businesses would be able to legally grow, distribute and sell their own product, though firms performing safety tests will have to be independent, with no financial ties to growers or retailers.

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Keeping an open container of marijuana in a vehicle would be illegal like it is for alcohol in California, except for people with a medical card or doctor’s note.

Brown and lawmakers agreed to allow sellers with no public storefronts to deliver marijuana directly to customers.

“There are thousands of businesses currently engaged in this type of commerce,” Hezekiah Allen, executive director of the California Growers Association. “The more of them that can get licensed, the better off the state is going to be, the faster we’ll be able to get rid of the criminal element and the faster we’ll be able to make sure the product is safe and tested.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Jeff Sessions Asks Congress to End Medical Cannabis Protections

When President Donald Trump signed a $1.1 trillion spending bill last month, he seemed to scoff at a provision that prevents the Justice Department from prosecuting state-legal medical cannabis. Now his attorney general, Jeff Sessions, wants to do away with the protection completely.

In a May 1 letter to congressional leaders, Sessions urged federal lawmakers to oppose the provision, known as the Rohrabacher–Blumenauer amendment. It’s yet another sign that, despite the president’s past support of medical marijuana, his administration appears to be planning a crackdown on state-legal cannabis.

“I believe it would be unwise for Congress to restrict the discretion of the Department to fund particular prosecutions, particularly in the midst of an historic drug epidemic and potentially long-term uptick in violent crime,” Sessions wrote in the letter.

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“The Department,” he continued, “must be in a position to use all laws available to combat the transnational drug organizations and dangerous drug traffickers who threaten American lives.”

The letter was sent to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi., was obtained by cannabis reporter and legalization advocate Tom Angell.

To justify his request, Sessions trots out a parade of prohibitionist talking points. He references the ongoing opioid epidemic, for example, but fails to note that states with legalized medical cannabis have seen opioid deaths decline by an average of 25%. He wrings his hands over “transnational drug organizations and dangerous traffickers,” but omits the fact that the Rohrabacher–Blumenauer amendment protects only state-legal cannabis actors.

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And, for good measure, he notes that the DEA “concluded that ‘marijuana has a high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision’”—despite the growing body of research that  suggests cannabis is safer and more effective than many Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmaceuticals.

The Rohrabacher–Farr amendment, last renewed in April, is set to expire in September if not renewed by Congress.

Sessions’s full letter is available at MassRoots.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Hawaii Cannabis Patients Wait Through Medical Marijuana Delays

HONOLULU (AP) — Medical marijuana dispensaries are beginning to open in Hawaii, but they’re not allowed to sell their products.

Instead, the leafy medicinal greens they’ve harvested are sitting on a shelf unsold because nearly a year after dispensaries were legally allowed to open, the state has not yet certified any labs to run required safety tests.

That means dispensaries such as Aloha Green on Oahu have no income despite payroll, rent and operations expenses that top $100,000 a month.

“For us it’s a little frustrating, having so many people on board, but it has to be done,” said James H.Q. Lee, CEO of Aloha Green. “I’m more concerned for the patients, because people have been calling: ‘We see it online, when are you going to open? We need our medical cannabis.‘”

Hawaii was among the first states to legalize medical marijuana 17 years ago, but dispensaries were only legalized in 2015. The state’s 17,000 registered patients have been left to grow marijuana plants on their own or buy it on the black market.

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The delays have been frustrating to potential customers, executives and employees in the nascent industry.

Since they’re paying for the space, Aloha Green decided to open their doors to the public Thursday for education and outreach.

“That’s indicative of how creative the licensees are having to be, because they’re bleeding money,” said Carl Bergquist, executive director of the Drug Policy Forum of Hawaii.

By law, dispensaries were allowed to open in July 2016, but none could open their doors or even begin growing cannabis because the state had not approved software to track the product from seed-to-sale.

“People are hoping for dispensaries to open, but they’re just waiting and waiting,” said Jari Sugano, whose 8-year-old daughter suffers from a form of severe epilepsy that can be treated with medical cannabis. “In the end, the delays are going to come back on the patient to pay back.”

But state officials and lawmakers say they’re working as fast as they can to set up an industry from scratch while ensuring patient safety.

“The dates that were in the legislation were unrealistic,” said Keith Ridley of the Department of Health. “I think we need to reset our timeframes.”

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Nationwide, it often takes states a year-and-a-half to two years to open medical marijuana dispensaries after passing a law, said Becky Dansky, legislative analyst for the national Marijuana Policy Project. The fastest state to set up dispensaries was Minnesota, which took about 13 months to open a narrow program; on the other hand, Maryland has no dispensaries open nearly five years after passing a law, she added.

“The idea of having dispensaries open in a year was extremely ambitious,” Dansky said of Hawaii.

Hawaii also faces unique challenges as an isolated island state with a small population, which makes opening a testing lab difficult.

“Everything’s inflated. Lease areas, getting expensive equipment shipped on-island, finding the space,” said Michael Rollins, chief administrative officer of PharmLabs, a lab based on Maui that is awaiting certification from the Department of Health.

Given Hawaii’s small population, it’s not a certainty that labs will earn enough revenue to cover costs, unlike Seattle, with its large population and laws permitting recreational marijuana, Dansky said. Some states with small populations, such as Rhode Island, do not require lab testing, she said.

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Changes in Hawaii’s regulations are also complicating the process for labs that are trying to open, Rollins said. For example, labs were originally required to test for 700 different pesticides, but the rule was changed to require testing for about 150 pesticides, he said. “That changes what type of equipment you need,” he said.

State officials say they are waiting on documents from the three laboratories that have applied, and are likely to approve at least one lab sometime this summer. But they don’t want to rush and risk approving an unsafe product.

Aloha Green had expected labs to open in May, Lee said. The crop can keep for up to one year in a cool, dark environment, but over time it loses potency, said Tai Cheng, chief operating officer of Aloha Green.

“I understand people’s frustration, but building an industry up from the bottom up, requiring as much regulation as we have, is going to take time,” said Hawaii Rep. Della Au Bellati, who pushed for the dispensary law.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Florida Governor: ‘I Absolutely Will Sign’ Medical Marijuana Bill

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida Gov. Rick Scott said he “absolutely” intends to sign the medical marijuana bill passed Friday by the state Legislature.

After the original legislation fell apart on the final day of the regular session last month, the chambers approved the bill during the final day of the special session. The House passed it 103-9 before the Senate voted 29-6.

The amendment, which was passed by 71 percent of voters in November, states that laws must be in place by July 3 and enacted by October. Scott should be able to sign the bill ahead of the first deadline.

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“They worked hard to get a bill that made sense. I think, in anything like this, there’s a process on how to make things better,” Scott said.

The legislation allows patients who suffer chronic pain related to 10 qualifying conditions to receive either low-THC cannabis or full-strength medical marijuana. THC is the compound that gives marijuana users a high.

“Both sides did compromise, and we both got a deal we could live with that is very good policy,” said Rep. Ray Rodrigues, who was the House’s point person on the bill.

However, supporters were not happy that the bill still bans smoking despite amendment supporters saying it is already written into the language. Sen. Jeff Clemens said that when 90 percent of patients access a product one way and the state does not allow that, then they are not instituting the will of the voters.

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Orlando attorney John Morgan, who played a key role in getting the amendment on the ballot and passed, said he intends to sue the state for not allowing smoking.

Ben Pollara, the executive director of Florida for Care, said he was pleased that the Legislature was able to come to an agreement and not leave rulemaking up to the Department of Health.

“The Legislature did their jobs today, providing good patient access to hundreds of thousands of sick and suffering Floridians,” he said. “This bill isn’t perfect, but it’s a major step forward for patient access.”

Both chambers reached agreement Wednesday that there would be a cap of 25 dispensaries per medical marijuana treatment center and that there wouldn’t be a sales tax. There will also be 10 new growers approved by October, adding to the seven already in existence.

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Two of the current growers had differing views about the caps. Trulieve CEO Kim Rivers said they are reviewing the bill before determining their next steps. Jake Bergmann, the founder and CEO of Surterra, said his company was fine with the structure.

“There is a way to grow as the patients grow (four new dispensaries per 100,000 patients). If you have something that grows as patient access grows, it is pretty smart,” he said.

According to the Department of Health, the state registry now has 16,614 patients. A recent state revenue impact study projects that by 2022 there will be 472,000 medical cannabis patients and $542 million in sales.

Sen. Rob Bradley, who has been the Senate’s main negotiator on all three bills since 2014, said he foresees medical marijuana being dealt with yearly in the Legislature the same way as alcohol.

The fact that the primary disagreements were over money and placing limits on competition was troubling to Sen. Jeff Brandes, who advocated for more competition.

“People are just deeply frustrated. I think that is why you are seeing the Senate capitulate,” Brandes said. “I think we could have done a lot better than what is here. We’re setting ourselves up for the next 30 years to be fighting little battles.”

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

10 Things to Know About Florida’s Medical Marijuana Bill

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — The Florida Legislature on Friday finally approved a bill establishing a framework for the state’s constitutional amendment expanding medical marijuana. The amendment, approved by 71 percent of voters in November, states that laws must be in place by July 3 and enacted three months later.

Here are some highlights:

Conditions Covered

Epilepsy, chronic muscle spasms, cancer and terminal conditions were allowed under bills passed in 2014 and 2016. The amendment now includes HIV and AIDS, glaucoma, post-traumatic stress disorder, ALS, Crohn’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and similar conditions.

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Patients & Caregivers

Patients and caregivers must be 21 and over. If a patient is a minor, a caregiver must be certified. Both must also receive an identification card. Advocates still would like to see caregivers not subject to penalties if they have to administer marijuana in the case of an emergency.

No Smoking

Smoking medical marijuana remains prohibited despite public demand. John Morgan, the driving force behind getting the amendment on the ballot last year and passed, said the only place where smoking is banned is in public places and intends to sue.

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Products

Besides vaping, medical marijuana products can be sold as edibles (as long as it is a food product and does not market or appeal to children), oils, sprays or tinctures. Vaping cartridges, especially whole-flower products, must be in a tamper-proof container.

Patient Supplies

Patients may receive an order for three 70-day supplies before having to visit a doctor again to get re-examined. A physician must recertify a patient at least once every 30 weeks instead of once every 90 days.

No Waiting Period

The requirement that a patient be in the care of a certified doctor for 90 days has been removed. The waiting period, which was a part of the last two bills signed by Gov. Rick Scott, came under more scrutiny when cannabis was extended last year to terminal patients. Also, the certification course for doctors has been reduced from eight hours to two.

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Snowbirds Welcome

Seasonal residents –those who reside in Florida at least 31 straight days each year, maintain temporary residence and are registered to vote or pay income tax in another state– will be eligible to receive medical marijuana.

More Treatment Centers

There will be 10 additional medical marijuana treatment centers by October. Five will be awarded by August 1 to nurseries that were narrowly defeated when the original distributors were selected in December 2015. Of the other five that will be awarded by October, one will go to a group of black farmers with citrus growers given preference to two others. By the end of the year there could be as many as 19 treatment centers.

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New License Requirements Relaxed

Instead of a nursery needing to be in business for 30 years, any Florida business that has been operating five or more years and has a medical director on staff can file an application.

Growing Market

There is a cap of 25 retail facilities per medical marijuana treatment center but it allows for four more shops per 100,000 patients with that cap subject to expire in 2020. Four more centers will be licensed per 100,000 patients. The state forecasts 472,000 patients in five years.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Connecticut Commissioner Agrees to Add 3 Qualifying Conditions

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The Department of Consumer Protection commissioner has agreed to make three more conditions eligible for medical marijuana treatment in Connecticut.

Michelle Seagull notified the Board of Physicians Friday that she will follow the panel’s recommendation to add Hydrocephalus with intractable headache, intractable migraines and Trigeminal Neuralgia to the list. The decision applies only to adult patients.

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The Board of Physicians did not recommend making anxiety disorders and Menieres Disease eligible for medical marijuana.

There will be another public hearing on the three additional conditions after the Department of Consumer Protection drafts regulations. Those regulations will then be reviewed by the Attorney General’s office and sent to the legislature’s Regulation Review Committee for approval.

There are currently 22 qualifying conditions for adults and 6 for patients under 18.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

LA’s New Proposed Cannabis Regs: Here’s What You Need to Know

After more than a year of community meetings, bureaucratic review, and sometimes bitter industry infighting, the Los Angeles City Council released its draft cannabis regulations Thursday. While still subject to public comment and revision, the proposed rules give a glimpse of what the industry might look like in California’s largest cannabis market.

Much of the document is unsurprising. As lawyer Hilary Bricken of the cannabis-focused Harris Bricken law firm points out, “most of these initial regulations identically track initial state regulations” under the state’s medical cannabis law. (If you’re not familiar with those, you might want to start by reading our quick explainer.) But Los Angeles has long been something of an odd duck when it comes to cannabis regulation, and there are some provisions that will continue to set the city apart.

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Newcomers, Don’t Get Your Hopes Up

Existing dispensaries that operate with the city’s blessing (thanks to a complicated regulatory scheme, 135 dispensaries are allowed to operate despite a blanket ban on retail cannabis) will have first crack at city-issued “compliance certificates.” Applications from the general public won’t be accepted until after existing dispensaries are considered. In an effort to promote equity in ownership, the number of certificates granted to the general public may not exceed the number granted to applicants through a diversity-focused social equity program. That process could take months or years.

No Explicit Limit on Number of Retail Stores

The draft regulations don’t put a hard cap on the number of dispensaries in LA. That said, because certificates will be granted under a multi-phase process that ties the number of general public certificates to the number of social equity program certificates awarded—under a program yet to be established—the expansion of LA’s cannabis market is will be limited to some degree.

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Bye Bye, BHO Production

Cannabis manufacturing that makes use of volatile chemicals won’t be allowed in Los Angeles. This is primarily aimed at cannabis concentrate producers, who sometimes use volatile solvents like butane or ethanol to produce extracts used in dabbing, vaporization, edibles, and other manufactured products.

The city’s not joking around. Anyone convicted of manufacturing with volatile compounds will be prohibited from commercial cannabis activity for 10 years.

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(Legal) Delivery Is Coming!

If you’ve been unaware of the contentious fight around Los Angeles cannabis deliveries, consider yourself lucky. Once the target of enforcement actions by City Attorney Mike Feuer, delivery services will now be permitted in LA under regulations that mirror the state’s. One slight qualifier: Deliveries may not occur outside the city without express permission from LA city officials. That could cause headaches in a city that contains multiple municipalities within its own boundaries.

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Diversity Will Be a Priority—Eventually

“Criteria for applicants under the Social Equity Program will be developed based on a social equity analysis aimed at promoting equitable ownership and employment opportunities in the cannabis industry in order to decrease disparities in life outcomes for marginalized communities and to address the disproportionate impacts of the war on drugs in those communities,” according to the draft regulations. After that, the program will need the City Council’s sign-off.

Distributing the fruits of legalization equitably has become a big issue, especially as other states struggle to welcome people of color into the regulated market. It’s especially important to the cannabis community in multiethnic Los Angeles, where the public urged officials to take diversity into consideration when granting certificates. For now, however, the city’s description of the equity program reads like a very wordy IOU.

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Dispensaries Can Stay Open While Awaiting Certification

To minimize interruption of the city’s existing cannabis market, compliant dispensaries will be  allowed to continue operating while certificate applications are pending. But if and when an application is rejected, it’s game over. At that point both the applicant and the owner of the property where the activity is taking place could face enforcement actions.

Growers and processors, you can carry on so long as you’ve been in operation since before Jan. 1, 2016, and submit a certificate application within 30 days of said applications becoming available.

Existing Dispensaries Must Act Soon

Applicants with priority—existing dispensaries that have been in compliance with LA’s complicated regulations—have just 60 days to submit applications after they become available. If that’s you, read that again: You’ll have just 60 days. Priority applicants who miss that window will be treated as new retail applicants.

If city officials deem an application incomplete, the applicant has three months to correct all deficiencies, so it may be worth submitting an application on time even if it’s not complete.

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LA Growers Do It Indoors

Warehouse cannabis cultivation is the norm in Los Angeles, and it looks like it will stay that way. The draft regulations bar outdoor and mixed-light grows.

Cultivation Facilities May Have to Move—by 2024

If an existing dispensary’s on-site cultivation facility falls in a zone not designated for indoor growing, the business will have to stop growing there—but not immediately. They’ll have until the end of 2024 to end operations.

Public Employees May Not Apply

No business may be held by individuals in public office or employed by any state agency or subdivision, including the city of LA. That means no ownership interest whatsoever, direct or indirect, in any city-certified business. 

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Protection for Unionization

Applicants with 10 or more employees will need to show that they’ve entered into a labor peace agreement and provide a copy of the agreement. It’s a move meant to ensure that union representatives have access to the property during business hours, a state rule.

Get a Certificate? Don’t Try to Sell Your Business

“Businesses are not transferable once a Certificate of Compliance is issued, including a Provisional Certificate of Compliance,” the draft regulations say. Any changes to a business’s ownership or organizational structure “requires a new application, the initial application fees” and approval from officials. Out-of-state investment or ownership is also prohibited.

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Love It? Hate It? Weigh In Soon

Written comments should can be submitted via email (richard.williams@lacity.org) or mailed to to the city clerk’s office:

Los Angeles City Clerk’s Office
Richard Williams, Legislative Assistant
200 N Spring St., Room 360
Los Angeles, CA 90012

richard.williams@lacity.org

To make sure your comments are seen, submissions should reference “Council File No. 14-0366-S5”


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