Tag: Nevada

Nevada Wholesaler Steps Up to Restock Dispensaries

Nevada’s cannabis crisis may have been averted…at least for the time-being.

New Cannabis Ventures reports that a cannabis distribution company known as Blackbird Logistics will be helping restock empty shelves at newly opened Nevada dispensaries and retail cannabis shops for the first time since legalization went into effect on July 1.

RELATED STORY

Legal Cannabis in Nevada: What to Expect

Blackbird Logistics is an ancillary company based out of Reno and offers a number of services, including a point-of-sale system, home and dispensary delivery services, data collection, and, most crucially in this instance, facility transportation from producer to retailer.

When Question 2 was passed last November, the text specifically allowed for alcohol wholesalers to have the first crack at cannabis distribution licenses for the first 18 months of retail cannabis sales. This created a lawsuit that nearly delayed the opening of the first retail shops, as alcohol wholesalers fought medical marijuana distributors for the right to produce and distribute cannabis for Nevada’s legal market. However, the Nevada Department of Taxation released a statement that, as of July 5, none of the seven alcohol wholesalers that have applied met the application requirements to complete the licensing process.

RELATED STORY

Some Nevada Cannabis Retailers ‘Running on Fumes’

With distribution licenses tied up in litigation, dispensaries and retailers were restricted to selling only what was already on the shelves on June 30th before opening day. With legal cannabis in high demand on the tourist circuit, retailers ran out of cannabis so quickly that Governor Brian Sandoval agreed to sign an emergency regulation to expand distribution licenses.

Blackbird Logistics has been a medical marijuana distributor since 2015, but recently partnered with an alcohol distributor to allow them to distribute cannabis on the retail market, making them officially the first licensed cannabis distributor on the legal Nevada market.

RELATED STORY

Nevada Cannabis Sales Exceed Stores’ Expectations

The Nevada Tax Commission is scheduled to meet July 13th to determine whether there will be enough alcohol wholesalers to distribute cannabis, and they may adopt the emergency regulations in an effort to support new retail business and avoid customer diversion to the black market.

There are currently 47 licensed cannabis retailers spread across Nevada, selling approximately $3 million worth of cannabis in just the first four days of legal sales. State officials are expecting sales to top $30 million by the end of 2017, making a licensed distributor all the more important in the coming weeks.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Some Nevada Cannabis Retailers ‘Running on Fumes’

RENO, Nev. (AP) — Most of Nevada’s recreational marijuana retailers are optimistic an emergency regulation that state officials are expected to approve will help keep them from running out of cannabis products, but some are “running on fumes,” an industry official said Tuesday.

The State Tax Commission is scheduled to vote Thursday on an emergency measure Gov. Brian Sandoval endorsed late last week in an effort to allow the state to issue cannabis distribution licenses currently banned by a court order.

RELATED STORY

Nevada Officials to Consider Emergency Rule on Cannabis Distribution

Nevada Tax Department spokeswoman Stephanie Klapstein said some of the 47 licensed retailers have reported twice as much business as they anticipated since recreational sales began July 1, and many fear their shelves soon will be empty.

Nevada Dispensary Association President Andrew Jolley said Tuesday most stores are “still doing OK in terms of supply.”

“But there are some that are obviously concerned given that we are 10 days into retail sales without being resupplied,” Jolley said. “I have heard of some dispensaries running on fumes, if you will.”

A legal battle over distribution of cannabis for recreational use threatens to jeopardize the flow of supplies from growers and manufacturers to retailers in the coming weeks.

The ballot measure voters approved in November legalizing the sales dictates that licensed alcohol wholesalers have the exclusive rights to cannabis distribution licenses for 18 months. But no alcohol wholesalers have completed the licensing process.

RELATED STORY

Nevada Cannabis Ruling May Delay July 1 Start Date

Before recreational sales began July 1, most dispensaries selling medical marijuana were authorized to serve as their own middleman and the bulk of them started stockpiling supplies months ago in an anticipation of high demand.

“Everybody that I know tried to augment their inventory as much as possible in the days and weeks leading up to July 1, but I’m not sure to what extent they were able to do that,” Jolley said Tuesday.

About a week before sales began, Sandoval’s chief of staff Michael Willden said state officials had been informed the dispensaries may have up to a 60-day supply of cannabis products.

“We are now informed that many have only days or weeks of product to be sold,” he said last week when the governor announced his endorsement of the emergency regulations to facilitate the issuing of distribution licenses to existing retailers.

RELATED STORY

Legal Cannabis in Nevada: What to Expect

The head of a company that owns hemp and cannabis operations in southern Nevada said the regulatory move can’t come soon enough.

“I don’t think anyone anticipated this strong of an initial demand, and by all accounts it’s a very real possibility that the state could literally be out of sellable products in August,” Friday Night Inc. CEO Brayden Sutton said Tuesday.

“Current production in Clark County was set up for a snoozey medical market, not the 10-time increase in sales that retailers experience once they can sell to anyone 21 and up,” he said.

On Monday, the Sparks City Council became the latest local jurisdiction to approve an ordinance allowing for recreational cannabis sales. Currently, there are four licensed retailers in Reno, one in Pahrump, one in Mesquite, one in Laughlin, four in North Las Vegas and 36 in Las Vegas.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

5 Lessons Learned Nevada’s First Week of Adult-Use Cannabis Sales

At midnight on July 1, Nevada became just the fifth state to launch a legal, adult-use cannabis market. Under skies lit with celebratory fireworks, thousands lined up outside dispensaries to make a purchase on the first day of sales.

“I’m tired of buying on the street.”

Steve Evans, customer

The launch came nearly eight months after state voters approved Question 2 to legalize adult-use cannabis—a blink of an eye compared to other states, many of which have been hit with long post-legalization delays. Not only were sales fast, they were also heavy: During the first four days, dispensaries raked in nearly $3 million in revenue and generated about $500,000 in taxes for the state, according to the Nevada Dispensary Association. The stronger-than-expected sales have been a boon to dispensary owners, but they’ve also raised concerns among some officials that stores risked running low on product.

RELATED STORY

Legal Cannabis in Nevada: What to Expect

We spoke to cannabis advocates and dispensary owners to pick out some of the lessons learned from the first week of Nevada’s adult-use era. Here are their top five takeaways:

1. Demand is Strong. Very Strong

In the week leading up to July 1, more than a dozen Las Vegas-area dispensary owners interviewed by Leafly said they weren’t sure exactly what to expect in terms of demand. They beefed up security and added staff to prepare for the high customer turnout, they said, but still were operating on educated guesses. At the end of the day, however, turnout far exceeded expectations.

RELATED STORY

Nevada Cannabis Sales Exceed Stores’ Expectations

At Reef Dispensary, just a block off the Las Vegas Strip, an estimated 500 customers waited in line before the midnight launch. One customer, 54-year-old Steve Evans, arrived at 7:30 p.m. to be first in line.

“It’s the longest I’ve been away from my home in eight years,” he said. “But I’m tired of buying on the street.”

Waits of more than an hour were reported at all 16 Las Vegas dispensaries that opened their doors at midnight. Long lines also greeted the 22 other dispensaries that opened their doors at regular business hours Saturday morning.

By Monday, the lines had only slightly died down. Waiting customers stood outside The Source Dispensary, on the west side of the Las Vegas Valley, for about 30 minutes before the dispensary opened its doors. “It met and exceeded what we thought would happen,” said owner Andrew Jolley, who said his customer count increased fivefold overnight. “Fortunately we were able to serve everybody.”

RELATED STORY

Las Vegas Live: Adult-Use Cannabis Debuts in Nevada

2. Dispensary Shelves Are Well-Stocked—So Far

After a June 20 court ruling that granted cannabis distribution rights exclusively to licensed liquor distributors, could, owners across the Las Vegas Valley brought in shipments by the truckload during the last few days of medical sales. Some, including Jardin Premium Cannabis Dispensary owner Adam Denmark Cohen, closed his dispensary the day before adult-use sales began to focus on shipping as much product as possible to stock his shelves. That came in addition to months of slowly building up shipment volume to prepare for adult-use sales.

“We’re doing well for now, but it might be a different story in a couple weeks.”

David Goldwater, owner, Inyo Fine Cannabis

“We didn’t go crazy, but we absolutely wanted to be prepared,” Cohen said.

David Goldwater, owner of Inyo Fine Cannabis Dispensary, said Friday that sales were “still going strong” but that he had a full lineup of products in inventory.

“We’re doing well for now,” he said, “but it might be a different story in a couple weeks if we don’t get the injunction figured out.”

By the end of the first week of sales, fears of a shortage had magnified. “We previously were informed the dispensaries may have up to 60 day supplies of product,” Michael Willden, Gov.  Brian  Sandoval’s chief of staff, told the Associated Press. “We are now informed that many have only days or weeks of product to be sold.”

RELATED STORY

Nevada Officials to Consider Emergency Rule on Cannabis Distribution

Sandoval’s office has authorized lawmakers to consider an emergency regulation that would allow officials to adjust rules if they determine the state doesn’t have enough distributors to keep retail shops stocked.

3. Everybody Played by the Rules

Investigators deployed across the state found no rule violations or illegal activity by dispensaries during the first week of sales, regulators at the Nevada Department of Taxation said Thursday. Department spokeswoman Stephanie Klapstein said that investigators made sure dispensaries sold only to buyers aged 21 and over. They also ensured state requirements for labeling, consumer safety, and packaging, were being followed.

RELATED STORY

Leslie Bocskor: Nevada ‘Best Regulatory Framework in the World’

4. There Are Still Some Hiccups, Especially for Patients

Besides the lines, which during the day left many marijuana buyers standing for over an hour in blistering desert temperatures of 110 degrees, some dispensaries reported lagging computers and other issues as swarms of buyers put pressure on internal systems.

“Our computers don’t know how to handle it yet,” said a cashier at Essence Cannabis Dispensary on the Las Vegas Strip, working frantically just after 2 a.m. during the Saturday launch. “We’re trying to keep everything running so it doesn’t crash.”

Waits added up, hundreds of customers across the Las Vegas Valley still waiting in line were sent home without having had a chance to make a purchase when shops closed their doors at 3 a.m.

RELATED STORY

Leafly List: The Best Cannabis Dispensaries in Nevada, Summer 2017

Medical cardholders also complained of an increase in prices, though registered patients received a 10% discount on cannabis products. “All of a sudden I’m paying almost twice as much for everything,” said medical-market shopper Norma Rodriguez after shopping at Reef Dispensary. “It’s not fair.”

5. Tax Revenue Might Actually Hit Those Ambitious Targets

With an estimated $750,000 in daily sales revenue during the first four days of recreational sales, the state brought in between $115,000 and $135,000 in tax revenue per day, totaling about $500,000 in taxes over the first four days.

“There was a lot of doubt that this would actually begin on July 1.”

Andrew Jolley, owner, The Source

As it stands, even that may not be enough to hit projections. Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval has called for $60 million in tax revenue from adult-use sales over the next two years. At the current rate, Nevada would raise only about $54 million over that period.

But with 13 additional medical facilities in the cities of Henderson, Sparks, and Carson City set to open their doors for adult-use sales next month, state Sen. Tick Segerblom (D-Las Vegas), a longtime legalization advocate, said he was confident in Nevada’s ability to hit that mark.

“We feel good where we are,” he told Leafly. “We just have to keep the sales going and keep moving forward.”

Jolley, owner of The Source, echoed that idea, saying he expects sales to increase next year as dispensaries become more logistically efficient and more of the 43 million annual visitors to Las Vegas are aware that adults can now legally buy cannabis.

“This week was especially impressive considering we didn’t really get the word out,” Jolley said. “There was a lot of doubt that this would actually begin on July 1.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Nevada Officials to Consider Emergency Rule on Cannabis Distribution

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval last week authorized state regulators to consider an emergency regulation that would allow officials to determine whether the state has enough marijuana distributors to keep its retail shops supplied.

Sandoval’s approval came this past Thursday, after dispensaries across the state reported higher than expected demand for marijuana since recreational sales of the drug became legal in Nevada on Saturday. The Nevada Tax Commission is expected to take up the regulations Thursday of this week.

RELATED STORY

Leslie Bocskor: Nevada ‘Best Regulatory Framework in the World’

The measure voters approved in November legalizing the sales dictates that licensed alcohol wholesalers have the exclusive rights to cannabis distribution licenses for 18 months. But no alcohol wholesalers have completed the licensing process.

“We are now informed that many have only days or weeks of product to be sold.”

Michael Willden, Gov. Sandoval’s chief of staff

A judge’s order in an ongoing court fight between the state and the alcohol distributors does not allow cannabis dispensaries to transport marijuana from a cultivation facility to the store. Before recreational sales began last weekend, most dispensaries selling medical marijuana were authorized to serve as their own middleman.

About a week before sales began, Sandoval’s office had indicated he wouldn’t go for an emergency regulation for distribution. He reversed his stance after sales exceeded expectations.

“We previously were informed the dispensaries may have up to 60 day supplies of product,” Michael Willden, Sandoval’s chief of staff, said in an email. “We are now informed that many have only days or weeks of product to be sold.”

RELATED STORY

Nevada Cannabis Sales Exceed Stores’ Expectations

Those 21 and older with a valid ID can now buy up to an ounce of cannabis. The Nevada Department of Taxation has licensed 47 dispensaries to sell recreational marijuana.

The department on Thursday said the shops have recorded well over 40,000 retail transactions, and some of them sold more than double of what they had expected.

Carson City District Judge James Wilson last month ruled the regulation the commission adopted in May that could have opened distribution up to others was invalid.

RELATED STORY

Legal Cannabis in Nevada: What to Expect

Wilson said the Tax Commission engaged in “ad-hoc rulemaking” outside the legal process when it made a preliminary determination earlier this year that the liquor industry didn’t have enough interest in entering the cannaibs business to ensure enough distributors would seek applications to meet the anticipated high demand.

“The department has not determined whether exclusively licensing liquor wholesalers as temporary marijuana distributors will result in an insufficient number of licenses,” Wilson wrote.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Nevada Reaps $500k in Pot Taxes while Massachusetts Earns Nothing

A supporter holds up a “Yes on 4” sign at the 2016 Boston Freedom Rally (Scott Gacek/The Daily Chronic)

Two of the states that legalized the adult use of marijuana in November have taken very different approaches to the opening of the retail marijuana marketplace.

In Nevada, where lawmakers and state regulators pushed for an early start to retail marijuana sales six months before the voter-approved measure called for it, marijuana sales began just in time for Fourth of July weekend. And in those four days, the state garnered over half a million dollars in tax revenue — and that’s a conservative estimate.

Meanwhile in Massachusetts, where lawmakers have already delayed the timeline on implementing their voter approved measure by six months, lawmakers have been working behind closed doors on a “repeal and replace” bill to hike the taxes and make other changes to the law.

While lawmakers in Boston debate whether to stick with the 10 to 12 percent tax approved by voters, which is what the state Senate voted on, or to jack up the tax upward of 28 percent that is favored by the House in what can only be perceived as a money grab by state officials who want their cut of the pie.

But the problem in Massachusetts is their approach.  In December, when most lawmakers weren’t even in the State House, about half a dozen lawmakers quickly passed a law that delayed the start of marijuana sales by six months.  At the same time in Nevada, a state senator began the push to allow marijuana sales to begin as soon as possible, which eventually became a six-month early start.

Massachusetts lawmakers reasoned that they need to extend the implementation timeline by six months so they could rewrite the law. Because, you know, in a state that boasts some of the country’s most renown academic institutions and is ranked number one in the nation for education, voters clearly can’t read or be trusted to know what they’re voting on.  Obviously, the 200 members of the state legislature know better than the 1,769,328 residents who voted in favor of Question 4.

Bay State lawmakers say they need to raise the sales tax on marijuana to cover the costs of administering the program. But while they wait, Nevada has already earned over $500,000 in taxes in just four days, and is on pace to generate over $30 million in marijuana tax revenue this year alone.

And that doesn’t include the payroll taxes that will be collected by employees working legally in the cannabis industry. Or the meal taxes that will be generated by stoners with the munchies. Or sales taxes collected on ancillary products such as grow equipment and smoking gear.

Of course, if you raise the taxes too much, nobody is going to buy weed legally.  Most consumers wouldn’t balk at a ten percent marijuana tax, which is just a little higher than the statewide sales tax on other consumer goods, and would likely turn to the legal marketplace when it comes time to buy some bud.

Lower taxes lead to lower prices, which leads to people buying more in the long run, generating more taxes as the cycle continues.  But if you more than double the tax, as proposed by lawmakers in the House, cannabis consumers won’t be as inclined to buy weed legally, especially if black market prices remain more competitive.  It’s not like Massachusetts residents haven’t been driving to tax-free New Hampshire for decades when making large purchases or anything.

But hey, what do I know? I’m just a voter who consumes a lot of cannabis, tax free.  And as long as the buffoons on Beacon Hill try circumvent the will of voters, so will thousands of cannabis consumers in Massachusetts.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Nevada Cannabis Sales Exceed Stores’ Expectations

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Recreational marijuana sales have exceeded the expectations of Las Vegas area store owners, who have seen long lines outside their dispensaries since Saturday, when Nevada became the fifth state with shops selling cannabis to the public.

That move jumpstarted a market projected to be fueled by the tens of millions of visitors that Sin City welcomes each year.

RELATED STORY

Las Vegas Live: Adult-Use Cannabis Debuts in Nevada

Eager customers on Monday again lined up before dispensaries opened their doors. Some were looking to make their first purchase since Saturday, and others were shopping for seconds. Tourists and locals alike have taken advantage of the change in state law.

More than 42 million tourists flock for business and pleasure to Las Vegas every year.

“I’m a very happy with the way sales have gone and continue to go, especially when you consider that the word didn’t really get out ahead of time.” said Andrew Jolley, president of the Nevada Dispensary Association and a store owner. “The public really only had a couple of weeks’ notice, whereas Colorado had a full year to prepare.”

Nevada voters approved legalizing recreational cannabis in November, but regulations needed before the sales could start weren’t approved until the past two weeks. The state later this week will release a report regarding the unannounced enforcement inspections that were conducted Saturday at dispensaries across the state.

The demand for recreational marijuana has been such that dispensaries had to turn away customers in line over the weekend, and at least one extended its hours of operation. Dispensaries reported wait times of 45 minutes to an hour Saturday afternoon and up to 20 minutes Sunday.

RELATED STORY

Leslie Bocskor: Nevada ‘Best Regulatory Framework in the World’

The Euphoria Wellness dispensary had 50 people waiting to make purchases midmorning Monday. Its marketing coordinator, Jim Ferrence, said budtenders helped at least 1,000 customers during the first two days of legal recreational cannabis sales.

Customers on average bought a quarter of an ounce of marijuana flowers and a sampling of various edibles and concentrates, Ferrence said. “Everyone was calm, cool and collected. No unruly crowds at all,” he said.

Those 21 and older with a valid ID can buy up to an ounce of cannabis. As of Friday, the state had licensed 44 dispensaries to sell recreational marijuana. Thirty-nine of those shops are in the Las Vegas area.

RELATED STORY

Legal Cannabis in Nevada: What to Expect

More than 42 million tourists flock for business and pleasure to Las Vegas every year. They along with visitors to the rest of Nevada are expected to make nearly two of every three recreational cannabis purchases in the state.

But people can only use the drug in a private home as it remains illegal to consume it in public, including the Strip, hotels and casinos. Violators face a misdemeanor citation and a $600 fine.

Fifteen tourists on Monday hopped on a bus for a three-hour tour of dispensaries in the Las Vegas area. The “Cannabus” took the visitors to two stores with whom they have an agreement to allow riders to skip the lines.

RELATED STORY

I Spent 3 Hours on Loopr, Denver’s New Dab Bus. Here’s Who I Met.

The recreational marijuana sales did not cause Las Vegas police a headache over the weekend. The department did not deploy additional officers and does not track misdemeanor citations, Officer Larry Hadfield on Monday said.

“It was business as usual,” he said. “Everything went smooth as far as we can tell.”

The state stands to earn millions from the sales of recreational marijuana, but the tax collection data won’t be available for several weeks.

RELATED STORY

Data Dive: Cannabis Sales Keep Climbing in Washington and Colorado

Nevada joins Colorado, Oregon, Washington and Alaska in allowing adults to buy the drug that’s still banned by the federal government. The market in the Silver State is expected to outpace all others in the U.S., at least until California starts its sales.

“With all due respect to Denver, Seattle, and Portland, Las Vegas is already the party capital of the world, and this is just an extension of that,” Ferrence said. “There’s no question that the demand is ever going to relent.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Can Nevada’s Recreational Marijuana Supply Keep up With Demand?

It’s been less than a week since recreational marijuana sales began in Nevada, and business is booming.  With sales even higher than expected, combined with an ongoing legal battle with alcohol distributors, supply issues could soon cause a buzz kill.

Early recreational marijuana sales began at several dozen medical marijuana dispensaries statewide on Saturday at midnight, with many dispensaries seeing long lines all weekend long as tourists and locals alike wait up to 45 minutes to purchase marijuana legally.

Dispensaries, such as Releaf in Las Vegas, have seen sales skyrocket from about 150 medical patients per day to over 1,000 customers per day all weekend long.  Euphoria Wellness, also in Las Vegas, also estimates serving 1,000 patients each day over the holiday weekend.

On average, dispensary operators say most customers buy around a quarter ounce of pot, and maybe an edible or two.

“I’m a very happy with the way sales have gone and continue to go, especially when you consider that the word didn’t really get out ahead of time.” said Andrew Jolley, president of the Nevada Dispensary Association told the Associated Press. “The public really only had a couple of weeks’ notice, whereas Colorado had a full year to prepare.”

The Nevada Dispensary Association estimates retail marijuana sales were approximately $3 to $5 million statewide over the weekend.

Recreational marijuana in Nevada is taxed 10% at the point of sale, and is expected to generate approximately $30 million in tax revenue this year.

While business may be booming and tax coffers increasing, higher than expected sales from the start brings about a real possibility of rising prices and short supply in coming weeks.

The price of wholesale marijuana in Nevada has risen to around $2,600 per pound, up $1,000 on average from just a month ago, as dispensaries stocked up in preparation for what was, at the time, an on-again, off-again, on-again July 1st start date.

But now, even the most prepared dispensaries could soon see a shortage of pot as a legal challenge between state regulators and alcohol distributors plays out.

Under Nevada’s recreational marijuana law, alcohol distributors were given the exclusive rights to transport recreational marijuana from growers and processors to dispensaries for the first 18 months of recreational sales, which were originally expected to begin in early 2018.

But because of the early start to recreational sales, with the state granting permission to medical marijuana dispensaries to sell to anyone 21 or older, none of the state’s alcohol distributors have been issued licenses to transport cannabis.

State regulators from the Department of Taxation say they had reached out to alcohol distributors in November, but received “insufficient interest” in the recreational cannabis industry.

The department said it only a handful of liquor dealers showed minor interest, but no concrete business plans were submitted for how those companies would distribute marijuana.

“While some were ‘interested,’ none followed up to indicate that they had a plan going forward to be ready to serve the market or that they had sorted out issues with respect to their federal liquor license,” the department said in March.  Cannabis distribution licenses cost $15,000 under the temporary regulations that go into effect with the state’s early start program.

Because liquor distributors are licensed on the federal level, where cannabis remains illegal, acting as a distributor of marijuana in Nevada could put those licenses at risk.

In March, the department decided that it would open the applications for distribution licenses beyond alcohol distributors, because the cannabis industry would not be able to operate.

But then came a legal challenge from the Independent Alcohol Distributors of Nevada, and a district judge in Carson City ruled in favor of the liquor distributors, giving them the exclusive right to transport recreational marijuana to dispensaries.

As a result of the judge’s ruling, marijuana retailers will only be able to sell their existing inventory.

The tax department is appealing the decision, but hope to begin issuing distribution licences to alcohol distributors soon.

“We expect to have some distributors licensed within the next three weeks or so,” Stephanie Klapstein, a spokesperson for the Nevada Department of Taxation, told CNN.

Most dispensaries say they have enough stock on hand to last several weeks, even with the increased sales from recreational customers, as long as the kinks in distribution are worked out soon.

“If this goes on for months, we’re screwed,” said one dispensary manager, who asked not to be identified.  “But for now, we’re good.”

Until then, stock up while you can, because as inventory starts to run low, expect prices to rise.

That’s the surest bet in Vegas.

Tags: , , ,


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Leslie Bocskor: Nevada ‘Best Regulatory Framework in the World’

As Nevada prepared to open its first adult-use cannabis stores on July 1, Leafly caught up with Leslie Bocskor, the Las Vegas investment banker and founding chairman of the Nevada Cannabis Industry Association. An early member of the ArcView Investor Network, Bocskor was recently named vice chairman of GB Sciences, a cannabis-based pharmaceutical research firm based in Las Vegas.

Leafly: What does recreational cannabis mean for Nevada?

Bocskor: It means we’re going to see a gradual end of the black market.

It’s great for business. It’s great for tax revenue. It’s great for compassionate access for people who aren’t even getting medical marijuana.

Getting it out of the black market, though, is the heart of it. By having a regulated market, we’re making sure that we’re not sending money out of the country to criminal organizations. That’s what resonates for me.

Leslie Bocskor: Nevada's testing regs will result in "the cleanest cannabis ever produced."Leslie Bocskor: Nevada’s testing regs will result in “the cleanest cannabis ever produced.” (Photo courtesy GB Sciences)

Can Nevada be a model for recreational cannabis in America?

People regard the Nevada framework as the best regulatory framework in the world. Nevada has a history regulating things other jurisdictions don’t — gaming, mixed martial arts, prostitution and escort services.

RELATED STORY

Legal Cannabis in Nevada: What to Expect

Nevada’s cannabis regulatory framework has been implemented in such a commonsense way. Testing for medical and recreational is the same. Colorado medical is not tested, but recreational is tested. Nevada has the most stringent testing: testing for microbial contamination, biological contamination, mold, mildew, fungus, heavy metals, pesticides, fungicides in parts per million and parts per billion. It’s the cleanest cannabis that’s ever been produced because of the testing regulations. If our food was tested as stringently as Nevada cannabis is tested, we’d have less food borne illnesses than we do.

Regulating cannabis is not like handling plutonium. Recreational cannabis is not going to cause the world to open up and start swallowing people. It’s going to be an enormous positive for Nevada. It’s going to be an enormous positive for all of the tourists that come here. And since we get tourists from all over the world, it will also be a way for other markets to see what legal, well-regulated cannabis can look like.

RELATED STORY

The Haymaker: Betting Against the House in Las Vegas

Nevada’s early-start recreational cannabis sales arrive with a rocky backstory, including a lawsuit to compel licensing of alcohol distributors and an emergency order by the governor that tightened regulations in order to start recreational sales. Doesn’t Question 2, the voter ballot initiative that legalized cannabis in 2016, already chart the course?

There’s so much confusion around this and there doesn’t need to be.

The ballot initiative did not specify a need [or mechanism] for fast-track implementation. The state began fast track implementation because having adult use legal, while not having a regulated infrastructure to provide the products to the consumers who want it, would create a larger black market.

The ballot initiative specified that regulation would be finalized by January, 2018. Somewhere along the way there was some confusion. [People mistakenly believed that] implementing fast track adult use meant implementing all measures of the ballot initiative at the same time. That is not true. You do not need to implement distributors under fast track because fast track was not what the ballot initiative called for. You need to implement distributors only under the ballot initiative language, which will take hold in 2018.

Why does the state want to fast track distribution licenses if the potential distributors aren’t yet ready to handle the business?

The state mistakenly started to pursue having distributors as part of fast track implementation. State officials didn’t understand that it was not necessary.

Then a court got involved and said the alcohol distributors who were given the opportunity, in the language of the ballot initiative, to apply for distribution licenses were not given enough time to go through application process to be part of fast track, which is true. But there is no mandate for them to be part of fast track.

RELATED STORY

The Secret History of Cannabis at the World Series of Poker

This court holdup doesn’t need to happen. We can still give the distributors licenses in a normal time period in 2018, even as we let existing medical cannabis distributors serve adult-use consumers under the fast track implementation system.

Once everybody realizes that, the whole thing goes away — the emergency order, the lawsuit, everything disappears as soon as all of stakeholders realize this is not necessary right now, that it is not mandated by the ballot initiative. This idea that distributors are necessary in fast track is a fallacy.

You praise Nevada’s regulatory framework. Does Nevada risk anything with these last-minute machinations?

Every jurisdiction that’s legalized cannabis has had fits and starts. Will Nevada look foolish? Every time you watch the sausage-making happen it looks messy. If we look at how Nevada implemented medical and how methodical and steady it was in the process, it ended up working very, very well. 

RELATED STORY

How a Top Cannabis Investor Looks at Your Company

One of the most progressive aspects of Nevada’s medical cannabis regulations is reciprocity, which allows medical cannabis patients from other states to purchase cannabis in Nevada dispensaries. Is reciprocity a success?

If you just measure it as an experience for consumers, it’s the best experience they’ll have in any jurisdiction.

States like Florida and Hawaii that have a fairly robust tourist industry, how they could not implement reciprocity as part of their programs is incomprehensible to me. How can you tell the tourists who are traveling to your jurisdiction — a cancer patient who’s traveling between their chemotherapy sessions, someone who suffers from MS and uses cannabis every day to manage their peripheral neuropathy, or someone who suffers from PTSD and uses it to deal with anxiety — that we’re going to force you to choose either not to come here, or to commit a crime by flying with cannabis, or forcing you to go to the black market? The reciprocity that Nevada implemented is just sound policy.

RELATED STORY

Going to EDC in Vegas? Better Consume Off Site

Nevada relies on out-out-state and international money to keep its economy rolling. The state welcomed outside investors in state cannabis businesses. Is that also a big difference?

Colorado and Washington said, “We’re going set up a legal marijuana industry but we’re not going to allow anyone from outside of the state to invest in it. They have to be citizens of this state.”

On its face it sounds good for the people of Washington and Colorado. But it’s not. It caused all sorts of mischief. People found work-arounds. It also created a problem in limiting the amount of capital and the number of good actors who could come in. It’s actually been worse for the citizens of those states than if they had allowed outside investors. Both Washington and Colorado have started to change to allow outside investment. Nevada allowed outside investment, along with reciprocity, from the beginning. These types of things are just common sense.

RELATED STORY

Cannabis Stocks 101: What to Know Before Investing

Does Nevada risk being over-regulated?

When was the last time you heard of a patron being cheated in a Nevada casino? It doesn’t happen. Nevada is the platinum standard globally for regulating casinos. If you have a Nevada unlimited gaming license, that speaks volumes. They say that it’s easier to become a Secret Service agent protecting the President of the United States than it is to become a Nevada unlimited gaming license holder. The vetting process is extremely comprehensive.

The same thing was applied in giving licenses for medical marijuana and now adult use. I know someone who ultimately got a license but the background check uncovered that when he was in college he got a DUI. This is a 50-year-old man! That held up the approval of his medical marijuana operators license. He had to explain himself.

RELATED STORY

These Are the Best 420-Friendly Hotels in the World

Nevada is extremely diligent in the “persons of good character” acid test to make sure that the people who are going to operate these business are people of character who are going to make the right decisions that they’re not going to make short-term decisions based on greed that they’re not going to divert product out of state or sell to minors. The Nevada gaming industry is so well run and is such a successful industry because the regulation has been handled so well. We’re seeing the same thing here with cannabis.

Which strain do you recommend to people coming to Las Vegas to sample recreational cannabis?

Tangilope, grown by Matrix Nevada. I’ve never before smelled or tasted anything like this. It smells like tangerines. It’s extraordinary. It’s available in many dispensaries in town.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Las Vegas Live: Coverage of Nevada’s Adult-Use Cannabis Debut

It’s July 1, 2017, and adult-use cannabis sales are legal in the Silver State. The first retail sales to folks 18 and over kicked off across the state shortly after midnight on Saturday morning.

In Las Vegas, just before the clock struck 12, state Sen. Tick Segerblom, Nevada’s legalization champion (swoon), posted this picture from the ground:

Leafly has correspondents on the Strip covering the festivities, and we’ll be updating coverage throughout the first day of legal sales. If you’re not already our friends on social media, follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

RELATED STORY

Legal Cannabis in Nevada: What to Expect

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Cannabis facilities are ramping up their work for expected lines starting early Saturday in Las Vegas and other Nevada cities that will begin selling cannabis for adult use after voters approved it in November.

But it won’t be a free-for-all in the place where many tourists think anything goes. Police say they have been preparing for months to enforce the law, putting a focus on keeping stoned drivers off the road but also cracking down on those who light up under the neon lights.

Nevada is marking the fastest turnaround from the ballot box to retail sales of any of the seven other states and the District of Columbia where cannabis is legal.

RELATED STORY

The Secret History of Cannabis at the World Series of Poker

Here’s a look at what’s expected from legal cannabis in Nevada:

Only in a private home, including yards and porches. While it may be legal to stroll down parts of the Las Vegas Strip with your favorite adult beverage, the same doesn’t apply to cannabis. It’s prohibited in casinos, bars, restaurants, parks, concerts and on U.S. property, from national forests to federally subsidized housing.

While anyone who is 21 with a valid ID can buy up to an ounce of cannabis or one-eighth of an ounce of edibles or concentrates, using it in public can get lead to a $600 ticket for a first offense.

Industry experts predict Nevada’s market will be the nation’s biggest, at least until California plans to begin recreational sales in January.

Nevada sales should eventually exceed those in Colorado, Oregon and Washington state because of the more than 42 million tourists who annually visit Las Vegas. Regulators anticipate 63 percent of customers will be tourists.

“I don’t think we’ve ever seen anything quite like what Nevada is going to look like just because of the sheer volume of tourism in the state,” said Nancy Whiteman, co-owner of the Colorado-based Wana Brands, which makes edible products.

RELATED STORY

The Haymaker: Betting Against the House in Las Vegas

However, it’s not clear how many people know cannabis is about to be legal. The law bans marijuana advertising on radio, TV or any other medium where 30 percent of the audience is reasonably expected to be younger than 21.

State gambling regulators have directed casinos to abide by federal law, which outlaws the drug. That means tourists will have a hard time finding a place to use it legally despite being the biggest expected piece of the market.

It’s one reason Whiteman and others think edibles will be most popular with visitors, who can eat the goodies almost anywhere without attracting attention, including casino floors where cigarettes are allowed but cannabis consumption is not.

Legislation to establish marijuana clubs and other places to smoke cannabis failed this spring but will be revisited by lawmakers in 2019. State Sen. Tick Segerblom, a leader of the legalization push, anticipates worldwide advertising urging tourists to “come to Nevada and smoke pot — so we must provide a place to do so.”

RELATED STORY

Where Can I Smoke Legally in a Legal State?

One Denver-based entrepreneur already has set up cannabis-friendly condos just off the Las Vegas Strip that allow cannabis smoking but not cigarettes. There’s also a “Cannabus” tour that offers riders a peek inside dispensaries, a grow facility and a swag bag filled with rolling papers and other gifts.

The drug’s potency is much higher than stuff sold on the streets a couple of decades ago. Edibles are the biggest concern because the effects can sneak up on newbies, who may take too much without realizing they are slowly getting high.

RELATED STORY

8 Ways to Counteract a Too-Intense Cannabis High

All packaged edibles, from gummies to brownies, must carry labels warning that the intoxicating effects may be delayed for two hours or more and that users should initially eat a small amount.

Some departments have been giving officers additional training on determining who might be impaired.

“It changes the dynamics of what we have to enforce and what we don’t in terms of marijuana,” Deputy Reno Police Chief Tom Robinson said. Previously, “police officers have been told to aggressively enforce marijuana laws. Now, we’ve got to change our stance, which isn’t a big deal, it’s just a mindset shift for our personnel.”

RELATED STORY

After Legalization, Nevada Authorities Take Uneven Approach to Cannabis Enforcement

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Legal Cannabis in Nevada: What to Expect

The wait is finally over: legal cannabis has come to Nevada! The first official sales will kick off at midnight on July 1, 2017 at Reef Dispensaries on Western Avenue, just west of the Las Vegas strip. State Senator Tick Segerblom, one of the leading proponents for legalization, will be the first legal cannabis customer.

Now that the big day has come and cannabis sales will officially be legal in the Battle Born State, brush up on Nevada’s guidelines, including who can purchase product, how much you’re allowed to buy, and more.

RELATED STORY

Tick Segerblom Wants Cannabis Stores in Las Vegas by Summer

Leafly Nevada legal cannabis guidelinesClick to enlarge. (Nick Ouellette/Leafly)

Who can purchase cannabis?

Anyone 21 years of age and older, with a valid government-issued identification.

How much cannabis can I purchase?

Up to one ounce of cannabis flower and up to 3.5 grams of cannabis concentrates.

Can I legally grow my own cannabis?

If you’re a Nevada resident, yes, you may! An adult may grow up to six plants in an enclosed, secure space, with up to 12 plants per household.

Can I consume cannabis in public?

Do not consume cannabis in public or in a moving vehicle. It’s also illegal to consume cannabis in casinos or hotels.

RELATED STORY

Public Cannabis Consumption Laws: A State-By-State Guide

Where can I use cannabis?

Consume cannabis responsibly in private residences.

What is the penalty for public consumption of cannabis?

Smoking cannabis in public is punishable by a $600 ticket.

If I visit Nevada from out of state, can I bring cannabis back home with me?

No, transporting cannabis across state lines is illegal. Don’t do it!

RELATED STORY

Can You Legally Transport Cannabis Across State Lines?

How will the legal market affect me as a medical marijuana patient?

In-state and out-of-state medical marijuana patients will still be able to visit dispensaries, and will be exempt from the state’s 10% excise tax on cannabis sales. The adult-use regulations will be very similar to those currently in place, but the Nevada Department of Taxation will now be in charge of overseeing the program, rather than the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health.

Can I drive with cannabis?

You may legally transport cannabis in your car, but smoking cannabis in a car could earn you a DUI charge, including jail time and a fine ranging from $400 to $2,000.

How much will retail cannabis cost?

Marijuana sold by retail shops will have be subject to a 10% excise tax at the point of sale.

RELATED STORY

Nevada Lawmakers Set Cannabis Tax: 10% Retail, 15% Wholesale

For more information, check out Nevada’s Retail Marijuana section, and read up on the latest Nevada news!


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.