Tag: regulations

‘Hello! Thanks for Visiting Maine. May I Take Your Cannabis Order?’

In Maine, as in certain other U.S. states, adults can buy beer at a drive-through as if they were buying hamburgers at McDonalds. Now Maine is considering extending drive-through privileges to cannabis.

First reported by the Press Herald, Maine’s proposed cannabis regulations would establish a system where adults 21 and older could purchase cannabis from licensed dispensaries through a drive-thru window, as well as being able to purchase cannabis over the internet.

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The proposed regulations earned praise from cannabis advocates like David Boyer, director of the Maine chapter of the Marijuana Policy Project.

“If Maine allows it for alcohol, we see no reason why it shouldn’t be allowed for marijuana, the safer substance, so long as Maine puts in place reasonable regulations to protect public safety and the consumer,” Boyer told the Press Herald’s Penelope Overton. “The voters want it regulated and taxed like alcohol. The rules should be the same.”

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However, some state officials oppose the regulations, out of fear that drive-through and online sales will increase chances of cannabis ending up in the hands of minors.

“Given the fact that about half the people in the state voted against legalization, I think we ought to go slow and be cautious in the beginning,” Republican Sen. Roger Katz of Augusta told the Press Herald. (Katz adds that there is still a long way to go, and he fully supports the legislative process.)

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The committee’s bill—which would also set up a 20% sales tax rate for recreational cannabis sales—will be the subject of a public hearing on Tuesday, Sep. 26, at 9 am EST, at Room 228 at the State House in Augusta. The committee will then reconvene on Sept. 27 and 28 to discuss the bill. If approved, the full Legislature will likely consider it next month.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Ontario Hypes Penalties for High Driving While Awaiting a Reliable Test

It’s one of the loudest talking points among those who dread Canada’s impending legalization of cannabis: How will law enforcement handle the presumed influx of high drivers soon to be flooding Canadian roads?

On Monday, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne spoke publicly on the topic, announcing enhanced penalties for those caught operating motor vehicles under the influence of cannabis, with the harshest penalties reserved for young drivers, novice drivers, and commercial drivers.

“We had a goal to balance the new freedom that people in Ontario will have to use cannabis recreationally with everyone’s expectation that it will be managed responsibly,” said Wynne.

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Specifics of the upped penalties come from the Canadian Press, which reports young and novice drivers (with a G1, G2, M1, or M2 licence) caught driving high will face licence suspensions of three to 30 days and fines between $250 to $450. Similar fines await operators of commercial vehicles found driving high, along with three-day licence suspensions.

“Overall, under the proposed changes any driver who registers a fail on a roadside screening device would be fined anywhere from $250 to $450,” reports the Canadian Press. “The current fine is $198. Drivers who refuse to provide a sample for a roadside test face a $550 fine under the proposed law, up from the current $198 fine.”

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The perennial problem with tracking high driving: Authorities still lack a reliable roadside test for cannabis impairment, primarily due to cannabis’s ability to remain detectable in bloodstreams days and even weeks after impairment has waned.

The proposed best hope: oral test strips, which would examine THC levels in saliva and are currently awaiting approval by the federal government. (However, as the Toronto Star notes cryptically, “It’s unclear how effective they will be in cold weather.”)

As always, stay tuned.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Detroit Voters Will Have Say in Cannabis Regulations

Detroit voters will have an opportunity to weigh in on the region’s cannabis industry in November, when newly proposed regulations appear on the local ballot. The changes, which would amend existing medical marijuana rules, include allowing dispensaries to open near liquor stores and expanding cultivation in the city’s industrial areas.

According to the Detroit Free Press, the amendments would:

  • Opt Detroit into the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act and establish standards to regulate caregiver centers through the city’s Building, Safety Engineering and Environmental Department regarding issuance, renewal and revocation. It also removes the jurisdiction of Detroit’s Board of Zoning Appeal.
  • Amend the definition of a Drug-Free School Zone to correspond to federal and state law that requires dispensaries to be at least 1,000 feet from schools, colleges and public libraries
  • Would allow dispensaries to open within 500 feet of another dispensary. They would also be allowed to open within 500 feet of exempt religious institutions where religious services are conducted regularly. The current ordinance requires facilities to be more than 1,000 feet from churches and other dispensaries.
  • Would allow dispensaries to open near liquor, beer/wine stores, child care centers, arcades and parks. The current ordinance does not allow them to be open near any of them.
  • Would allow dispensaries to stay open until 9 p.m. Currently, they’re required to close by 8 p.m.

Current zoning restrictions in Detroit have made it difficult for would-be dispensary operators to nail down an appropriate location. One of the proposed changes would help address that obstacle by amending rules in order to allow growers and “secure transporters” to open in the city’s M1-5 industrial districts.

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In Detroit, M1, or limited industrial districts are found along major and minor thoroughfares with older, usually vacant buildings. Generally speaking, this district is intended as a buffer between business and residential districts with more intensive industrial uses.

The cannabis advocacy group Citizens for Sensible Cannabis, which circulated petitions for the initiatives, filed a lawsuit last month against the Detroit City Clerk Janice Winfrey and the City of Detroit Election Commission, after officials said a measure to change zoning regulations would not appear on the November ballot, according to the Free Press.

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Elections Director Daniel Baxter, however, confirmed to the Free Press on Friday that the two proposals will indeed go before local voters on Nov. 7.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Washington Labs Launch Effort to Address Credibility Crisis

In the wake of allegations that Washington state’s top cannabis lab was artificially inflating THC test results and improperly passing samples that should have failed microbial safety screenings, the sector has found itself facing a serious credibility crisis.

Only one lab, Peak Analytics, was alleged to have engaged in questionable lab practices, news first made public in a Leafly investigation. But the fact that the company’s shoddy test results went undetected by regulators for so long has spurred consumers and industry insiders alike to ask who, if anyone, was testing the testers. Some have openly wondered whether cannabinoid levels on product labels are even worth the paper they’re printed on.

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Now a consortium of Washington state testing laboratories are taking matters into their own hands in an effort to win back trust.

After the initial lab exposé went live, The Cannabis Alliance (TCA), a Washington trade association, invited all the state’s 18 licensed cannabis-testing labs to a meeting. According to Nick Mosely, co-owner of Confidence Analytics, 10 labs attended the meeting, held in the central Washington city of Ellensburg.

“We need the trust of the producer-processors if we’re going to benefit our businesses and our business relationships,” Mosely, Confidence Analytics’ chief science officer and a TCA board member, told me. “Beyond that, obviously the consumers care and are interested in lab testing and what it means for the quality of the product.”

Allegations that Peak Analytics had artificially sweetened THC test results, published as part of a Leafly investigation, have raised questions about reliability of testing data. (Amy Phung/Leafly)

The group of testers arrived at a plan to measure themselves against one another. They settled on a round-robin model, in which each lab would receive blinded, pre-tested samples from one of TCA’s grower members. None of the labs would know which grower the sample came from or what its cannabinoid content was. Each lab would be asked to test the sample to its normal standards using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), a common testing procedure. Results would be publicly available on TCA’s website.

Eight labs ended up participating in the round robin: Analytical 360, Confidence Analytics, Green Grower Labs, Medicine Creek Analytics, Molecular Testing Labs, Steep Hill, Washington Testing Technologies, and Trace Analytics. Each tested two flower strains, a BHO sample, and kief. All the samples were homogenized via a process called freeze-milling, which is a more reliable method than simply grinding up the flower samples in a traditional blender.

The thinking went like this: If the results were to come back in a tight cluster around the sample’s known cannabinoid content, that would be an indication the labs were operating under the same standards. A wide spread, on the other hand, would indicate bigger methodological issues at play.

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The outcome? The resulting spread of THC percentages was less than three points, according to a report of the findings—relatively good news.

“While the outcomes of this experiment lend credibility to those labs willing to collaborate and show that the variability between them (described as one standard deviation) is less than 1/10th the measurement,” the report says, “there is always room for improvement.”

Labs that reported higher THC values than their peers tended to do so for all samples (likewise with labs that reported lower values), which the report’s authors suggested was most likely due to methodological differences in how each lab performs test procedures. The report also notes that there was disagreement among labs in terms of testing for minor cannabinoids, such as CBD and CBG .

Despite the differences, the report commended the eight participating labs for their mutual cooperation. “To have industry leaders, and business competitors, working together toward meaningful improvements to standards of practice is especially needed in a nascent industry where the unknowns are multivariate and the guidelines are still developing,” it said.

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Doing a ton of free testing, of course, isn’t something labs are usually keen on. But Mosely said the aim—to get the state’s testing labs on the same page—was well worth it.

“There obviously is quite a bit of extra effort in order to get that consistency,” he said, adding that “everybody up and down the chain is benefitting. It starts with the labs.”

The round-robin testing, Mosely added, goes above and beyond the standard proficiency testing performed by RJ Lee, the state’s accrediting body for labs. RJ Lee is located out of state and thus can’t handle physical cannabis, which makes their tests less applicable, Mosely said, contending that the round robin, performed completely within the confines of the state’s licensed cannabis system, better addresses the issue.

“The labs know they’re being tested and evaluated, and they presumably put on their best face and do the best that they can.”

Jim MacRae, data scientist

What the round-robin approach doesn’t do, however, is replace enforcement. Washington data scientist Jim MacRae, who has focused much of his work on tracking suspect results by the state’s cannabis labs, pointed out that all the labs involved knew they were participating in a round-robin test, even if they didn’t know the cannabinoid content of the samples they were testing.

“It’s these guys saying, ‘Here’s how good of a job we can do,’” MacRae told Leafly. “It’s certainly a cynic that would say they’re not doing this on a daily basis, but basically that test is an opportunity for them to show how good they can be.”

That fact, MacRae argued, underscores a fundamental problem with existing proficiency testing performed by the state’s designated lab auditor, RJ Lee: The testing is announced in advance.

“The labs know they’re being tested and evaluated, and they presumably put on their best face and do the best that they can,” MacRae said. Which means RJ Lee’s proficiency testing—as well as the round-robin tests performed by TCA—are great at evaluating a lab’s “capability” but not necessarily its “culpability,” as MacRae put it.

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“Capability shows what they can do when they’re on their best behavior,” he said. “If what they display when they don’t know they’re being evaluated is significantly different than what they display when they know they’re being evaluated, then there’s a problem there.”

Mosely, of Confidence Analytics, agreed. But he said the effort to ensure consistency between testing labs isn’t meant to replace enforcement efforts.

“Proficiency testing is not intended as an enforcement mechanism,” he says. “Neither is round robin. The participants know they are participating. They do it to improve their methodology, not as a gotcha. A good proficiency testing program helps good labs do better.”

But what about labs whose problems have more to do with ethical deficiencies than  methodological ones?

Identifying bad actors among the state’s licensed cannabis labs is a difficult process, one that requires collecting data from labs without letting them know. That responsibility rests with the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (LCB). And MacRae, for one, doesn’t think the agency is taking the job very seriously.

“The LCB has allowed this to continue on and on and on,” he said. “The bottom line is this: When labs do [this]—giving superior potency results, failing to fail samples—the LCB doesn’t seem to give a shit.”

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The LCB does indeed operate a secret shopper program for labs, however, and has tested 220 samples since it began in late 2016, according to Brian Smith, the agency’s communications director.  Regulators so far haven’t issued any violations based on those tests and are still reviewing the results, he said.

The LCB did recently suspend Peak Analytics’ testing license, but that action came in response to an audit by RJ Lee, which itself was prompted by an outside complaint against Peak—not by a secret shopper.

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As Mosely points out, however, the LCB’s secret-shopping program can be difficult to administer.

“Secret shopping is expensive. You have to pay for the tests. You have to lot the samples in traceability. You have to send someone out undercover. One sample is not enough. You need n-power if you want to stand in court and make a case,” he explained. “Lot’s of ins, lot’s of outs.”

In the meantime,  the question of how to effectively stop labs from cheating remains unanswered. While the round robin represents a significant step forward for lab standardization, it doesn’t replace the type of consumer assurance that government oversight provides. Whether the LCB’s program will develop into something that does is anyone’s guess.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Hawaii Says It’s 1st State to Go Cashless for Cannabis Sales

HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii said Tuesday that it will be the first state to require marijuana sales to be handled without cash, saying it wanted to avoid robberies and other crimes targeting dispensaries.

Medical marijuana dispensaries in Hawaii won’t be allowed to accept cash beginning Oct. 1 and will require people to use a debit payment app instead. The app is already an option for marijuana transactions in six states, including California and Colorado.

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Many marijuana businesses use cash because banks fear cannabis money could expose them to legal trouble from the U.S. government, which regulates banking and still bans marijuana.

The debit app called CanPay uses a Colorado-based credit union to facilitate transactions. Some mainland credit unions have opened accounts for cannabis businesses.

Hawaii was among the first states to legalize medical marijuana in 2000 but the state didn’t grant licenses to any dispensaries until last year. Maui Grown Therapies became the first to open last month after the state Department of Health gave it approval to begin sales.

During the Obama administration, the Justice Department issued guidelines to help banks avoid federal prosecution when dealing with cannabis businesses in states where the drug is legal.

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But most banks don’t see those rules as a shield against charges that could include aiding drug trafficking. And they say the rules are difficult to follow, placing the burden on banks to determine if a cannabis business is operating within the law.

There is also uncertainty over how the Trump administration will react. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has said he wants to crack down on the legal marijuana industry.

Credit card companies like Visa and Mastercard say they won’t allow their cards to be used to buy cannabis or marijuana-related products.

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Patients who don’t own smartphones will have to create CanPay accounts with an email address and personal identification number. Patients will be able buy cannabis by logging on to their accounts with computer tablets at the dispensaries.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Michigan to MMJ Dispensaries: Close by Dec. 15 or Risk Licensure

BATH TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — The state of Michigan on Wednesday gave medical marijuana businesses until Dec. 15 to close or potentially risk not obtaining a license under a new regulatory system aimed at increasing oversight and imposing new taxes on the industry.

The decision means registered patients will have to grow their own cannabis or obtain it from caregivers — as allowed for under existing law — until the state issues the licenses, likely in the first quarter of next year. It will accept license applications starting Dec. 15.

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After learning of the decision, a new state licensing board dropped a member’s proposal to tell shops they would not get a license if they stayed open beyond this Friday — which had been blasted by patients, shop owners and others. They expressed concern, however, with the new deadline as well, questioning how some patients will buy their marijuana.

“Continued operation is a business risk as they may be shut down by law enforcement or denied licensure.“

Andrew Brisbo, MMJ bureau director

The dispensaries — which are not explicitly addressed under a 2008 voter-approved medical marijuana laws — have gone unchecked in some municipalities and have been blocked in others under a Michigan Supreme Court ruling that questioned their legality.

A five-tiered licensing system is being developed under a 2016 law that further regulates medical marijuana. It will impose a new tax and establish licenses to grow, process, sell, transport or test marijuana.

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Andrew Brisbo, director of the state’s medical marijuana bureau, said dispensaries still open after Dec. 15 will face a “potential impediment to licensure.” Three months affords enough time for existing operations to wind down their affairs and for patients to connect with caregivers, he said.

“The department will not shut down facilities,” Brisbo said. “However, continued operation is a business risk as they may be shut down by law enforcement or denied licensure.”


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Will Michigan Shut Down Dispensaries Until December?

Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Licensing Board will meet Tuesday and could vote to close the state’s medical cannabis dispensaries until mid-December.

The potential pause is the result of a 2013 state Supreme Court ruling that labeled dispensaries a public nuisance and called into question their legality. Now, more than four years later, the licensing board is attempting to act on the ruling. New state regulations for licensing are scheduled to kick in on Dec. 15, and board members have indicated they will attempt to shut down Michigan’s medical cannabis program until that time.

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Board member Don Bailey introduced the closure motion at an Aug. 21 meeting at which he referenced the Supreme Court ruling and said he believed all dispensaries are currently operating in violation of state law. That sentiment was echoed by board chair Rick Johnson.

While the board has so far postponed action on the motion, members will have another chance to act when the five-member committee reconvenes on Tuesday.

That meeting will come almost exactly a year after the matter was addressed by the Michigan State Senate, which hastily passed legislation on Sept. 9 of last year to clear up the gray area created by the 2013 Supreme Court ruling. In total, lawmakers passed three bills to address questions around dispensaries, edibles, and seed-to-sale tracking systems. The bills’ passage led to the new regulations set to take effect in December.

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But with just three months to go until the regulations kick in, Bailey’s introduced motion would require that all dispensaries temporarily close in order to be eligible for licenses come December.

With one member absent from that meeting, Bailey’s motion wasn’t considered for a vote. But even the suggestion of temporarily closing the state’s dispensaries sparked a response from patients concerned about access.

In a statement to Leafly, David Harns, a spokesman for the Bureau of Medical Marihuana Regulation (BMMR), said the agency is “currently reviewing the recommendations and discussions from the Medical Marihuana Licensing Board, and consulting with the Attorney General’s office before any action is taken.”

The state’s attorney general, Bill Schuette, is no friend of dispensaries.

At the next meeting, the board will make “a determination” regarding the board’s authority on this matter. Harns said any action ultimately taken will be handled in a manner that takes patients and dispensaries into account.

“BMMR will make recommendations and give guidance to the board on how to best implement any potential actions to ensure that patients are protected and the delivery of services to licensees are fair and efficient,” he said.

That doesn’t necessarily mean the state will act to protect cannabis dispensaries should the board move to temporarily shut down the system, however. The state’s attorney general, Bill Schuette, is no friend of dispensaries.

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Schuette was also the AG at the time of the 2013 Supreme Court ruling. He and a local prosecutor initially brought the case to the Supreme Court and argued in favor of prohibiting retail marijuana sales in any fashion.

As part of the case, Schuette sent a letter to the other 83 county prosecutors with instructions on how to file similar nuisance actions. In a press release, he was quoted as saying that other dispensaries in the state “will have to close their doors.”

Schuette has not publicly updated his stance since the Senate passed its update bill in September 2016.

It was that legislation that created the Medical Marihuana Licensing Board. The bill laid out the procedures for how the five members would be appointed and established its legal authority. By law, the body is charged with the “general responsibility for implementing this act,” but the legislation gives no specific reference or mention of the board’s authority before the regulations are put in place.

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Bailey’s motion seeks to utilize the board’s “jurisdiction over the operation of all marihuana facilities” per state law. If the vote proceeds, support from three of the five members of the board could temporarily halt the retail sale of cannabis, at least until the new regulations take effect in December.

Only four members were present at the Aug. 21 meeting, but with more time and an extra vote at the table, Bailey could receive the support he needs to move forward with the motion when the board meets on Tuesday. The meeting starts at 12 p.m. Eastern Time, and can be viewed via a livestream on the state government website.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

San Diego Considers Plan to Expand Industry Licensing

With adult-use cannabis sales set to become legal on Jan. 1, cities across California continue to hash out local rules and regulations for industry. The latest, San Diego, is scheduled to consider a proposal Monday that would legalize cannabis cultivation, manufacturing, and testing in the city.

If approved, the plan would continue San Diego’s slow loosening of restrictions on cannabis. The city only began allowing dispensaries in 2015, and earlier this year, officials agreed to allow 16 already-approved medical marijuana dispensaries to expand sales to non-medical consumers once recreational sales begin.

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It’s anyone’s guess as to which way the City Council will fall on the proposal, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports. The nine-member body is made up of five Democrats and four Republicans. Democrats reportedly have shown “more enthusiasm” for relaxing the law than have the four Republicans.

San Diego’s police department has recommended the council reject the proposal, claiming concerns about crime and safety. Police Chief Shelly Zimmerman suggested there would be a “significant” increase in service calls, predicting an increase in explosions and fires. Law enforcement in the region has long had a fractured relationship with the cannabis industry.

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Local industry representatives such as Phil Rath, executive director of The United Medical Marijuana Coalition, say it’s crucial to have a complete supply chain for cannabis locally, which could build in efficiencies and decrease prices by eliminating transportation costs.

But Rath said there are some concerns with the proposal to allow cultivation and processing. The plan would limit the number of cultivation and manufacturing businesses to a maximum of two per City Council district, for a total of up to 18. Rath has said the suggested two-per-district cap would not produce enough cannabis to meet demand in the city.

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“To meet local, legal demand, the number of these permits is going to have to be somewhere in the range of 40 to 50,” he said.

Cannabis taxes will also be on the council’s agenda. San Diego voters approved a local tax on adult-use cannabis in November that starts out at 5%. It rises to 8% in July 2019. The tax can increase to as much as 15% with council approval and would apply to cannabis cultivators, producers, and dispensaries.

There are a few other cities in San Diego County that also sell cannabis legally, including La Mesa and Lemon Grove. La Mesa has indicated it might also begin to allow cultivation.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Panel Bans Cannabis Possession, Ads at Las Vegas Airport

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Recreational marijuana may be legal in Nevada, but add McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas to the list of places including casinos where cannabis is still banned.

Violators could face a misdemeanor charge or civil fines.

Clark County commissioners have banned marijuana possession and advertising at the airport in a vote Tuesday that raised the possibility travelers leaving town with less than an ounce could get a ticket and have their marijuana confiscated.

If federal Transportation Security Administration screeners find cannabis at security stations, they can alert Las Vegas police, officials said. Violators could face a misdemeanor charge or civil fines.

The decision keeps airport rules consistent with Federal Aviation Administration rules that consider marijuana an illegal substance, officials said.

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Commissioner Jim Gibson called it a victory for common sense.

Director of Aviation Rosemary Vassiliadis was assigned to set the amounts for civil fines.

Possessing more than an ounce of marijuana is still a felony.

The nation’s eighth-busiest airport by passenger traffic boasts liquor stores amid coffee, gift and other retail shops lining pedestrian areas that see more than 47 million travelers annually.

Questions about marijuana advertising at the airport have vexed commissioners who oversee the Las Vegas Strip and other county airports.

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The new ordinance applies to fixed signs and electronic screen displays in the bustling baggage claim area at McCarran. It also applies to mobile billboards, which must obtain permits to operate on airport property.

Commissioners decided the ad ban won’t apply to the advertising vinyl-wrapped taxis and personal vehicles picking up or dropping off airport passengers.

Recreational marijuana use became legal in Nevada on Jan. 1, and retail sales of recreational cannabis began July 1. But the federal Drug Enforcement Administration classifies marijuana as an illegal Schedule 1 controlled substance.

The Nevada Gaming Commission recently made clear that marijuana won’t be allowed in Nevada casinos as long as it remains illegal at a federal level.


Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Massachusetts’ Top Cannabis Regulator Says He’s Committed to Timely Rollout

BOSTON (AP) — The state’s top marijuana regulator pledged Wednesday to implement Massachusetts’ recreational cannabis law and do his best to meet an ambitious timetable for licensing and opening retail stores in the state, but acknowledged the task won’t be easy.

Steven Hoffman, a retired business executive making his first public comments since being named chairman of the Cannabis Control Commission, also explained during the news conference why he voted against the November ballot initiative that legalized adult use of recreational marijuana.

“I actually supported the objectives of the initiative,” said Hoffman. “My concern as a private citizen was I thought the timeline was pretty short to deal with some of the complexities and public safety issues involved in implementing the law, but I am a supporter of the objectives of the law.”

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Three of the four other commissioners appointed by top state officials also voted no, prompting concern from legalization advocates that the panel might take a hostile approach to the cannabis industry or seek to delay implementation.

The Cannabis Control Commission is a new five-member panel that will oversee recreational and medical marijuana.

The Legislature delayed key deadlines in the voter-approved law by six months while it crafted revisions that included higher taxes on marijuana and stricter guidelines for labeling and packaging marijuana products.

The panel still faces a decidedly tight timetable for opening the first retail shops by mid-2018, and Hoffman on Wednesday could not entirely rule out possible further delays. He said commissioners would hold their first meeting on Tuesday and begin the process of hiring staff, with an eye toward people experienced in the legal marijuana industry.

“We recognize that we have a lot of work to do in a very short time, but we are committed to working as hard and as effectively as possible to get the job done, fairly safely and on time,” said Hoffman.

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Hoffman, 64, said he used marijuana in high school and college, though rarely since. He did reveal, however, that in July 2016 he and his wife visited a cannabis shop in Colorado, where he purchased a T-shirt and a joint he later smoked. He was impressed by the security at the store and the “amazing variety” of products offered for sale, he recalled.

Backers of the marijuana law have called on the chairman to publicly request an increase in funding for the commission, arguing that the $2 million appropriated by the state for the current fiscal year falls far short of what’s needed to meet prescribed deadlines.

While saying the commission had enough money to get started, Hoffman appeared to acknowledge the concerns about funding.

“If the current financing is inadequate, which I suspect it will be, we’ll go to the Legislature, go through our plan and say, ‘here is what we need,’” he said.

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A Brief Guide to Massachusetts’ New Cannabis Law

Hoffman has no prior experience in government or in the cannabis industry, but the former Bain and Co. executive touted his experiencing in developing successful business plans for startup companies.

In addition to Hoffman, the other members of the commission are former Democratic state Sen. Jennifer Flanagan; Britte McBride, a former state attorney general; Kay Doyle, former legal counsel to the state’s medical marijuana program; and Shaleen Title, a prominent advocate for the inclusion of minority-owned businesses in the cannabis industry.


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