Tag: tax and regulate

Rhode Island Poll Finds Strong Support for Legalizing Marijuana

“Welcome to Rhode Island sign” at Beach Pond, Hope Valley, RI (Flickr/Morrow Long)

PROVIDENCE, RI — A new poll shows momentum is building behind the effort to end marijuana prohibition in Rhode Island.

Regulate Rhode Island director Jared Moffat held a news conference Tuesday at the State House to discuss the results. He was joined by Sen. Joshua Miller (D-Cranston) and Rep. Scott Slater (D-Providence), who recently introduced the Cannabis Regulation, Control, and Taxation Act.

According to the new poll from Public Policy Polling (PPP), about three out of five voters in the state (59%) are now in favor of regulating and taxing marijuana like alcohol, up from 57% in 2015.

Only about one out of three voters (36%) is opposed.

The statewide survey of 759 registered Rhode Island voters was conducted January 27-29 and has a margin of error of +/- 3.6%. The full poll results are available here.

“Rhode Island has the opportunity to become the third New England state to regulate marijuana for adult use,” said Miller, chairman of the Senate Health and Human Services Committee. “The results of this poll confirm that our constituents want us to follow the same path as Massachusetts and Maine.”

Separate polls of voters in various Rhode Island cities and towns found support for regulating and taxing marijuana is strong throughout the state:

  • Providence: 62% in favor; 31% opposed (354 respondents; MOE +/-5.2%)
  • Cranston: 58% in favor (up from 50% in 2015); 41% opposed (195 respondents; MOE +/-7.0%)
  • Warwick: 61% in favor; 35% opposed (254 respondents; MOE +/-6.2%)
  •  Newport: 64% in favor (up from 58% in 2015); 33% opposed (156 respondents; MOE +/-7.9%)
  • North Kingstown: 53% in favor; 45% opposed (225 respondents; MOE +/-6.5%)
  • Burrillville/Glocester: 70% in favor; 27% opposed (187 respondents; MOE +/-7.2%)

PPP polls conducted in 2015 also found 60% support in Coventry, 63% support in Cumberland, 52% support in Johnston, and 54% support in Narragansett.

“A strong and growing majority of voters support our proposal to regulate marijuana,” Rep. Slater said. “Our job is to represent the people of this state, and their position on this issue is pretty clear. It’s time to replace the senseless policy of marijuana prohibition with a sensible policy of regulation.”

The Cannabis Regulation, Control, and Taxation Act would allow adults 21 and older to possess up to one ounce of marijuana and grow one mature marijuana plant in an enclosed, locked space. It would establish the Office of Cannabis Coordination within the executive branch, which would be charged with coordinating among state agencies to establish a tightly regulated system of licensed marijuana retail stores, cultivation facilities, processing facilities, and testing facilities. The legislation would also create a 23% excise tax on retail marijuana sales in addition to the standard 7% sales tax.

“Most Rhode Islanders recognize prohibition has failed and seem to view regulating marijuana is a no-brainer,” Moffat said. “Regulation better protects young people, improves public health and safety, and creates more economic opportunities for workers and entrepreneurs in our state. No matter how you look at it, this is clearly a smart path for us to take. Lawmakers would be wise to follow the will of their constituents.”

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

New Mexico Marijuana Legalization Bill Slowly Advancing

SANTA FE, NM — A proposal to legalize marijuana for adult use has advanced through the first of three committees it needs to clear before advancing to a floor vote.

House Bill 89, the Cannabis Revenue and Freedom Act, is sponsored by Reps.  Bill McCamley (D-Las Cruces) and Javier Martinez (D-Albuquerque).

The bill was approved in January by the House Consumer and Public Affairs Committee, and is currently awaiting review by the House Business and Industry Committee.  It would also need to advance through the  House Appropriations and Finance Committee before being considered by the full House for a vote.

If passed, HB 89 would allow adults 21 or older to lawfully possess up to one ounce of marijuana in public, or up to two ounces at home.

Adults would be allowed to possess up to seven grams of concentrates.

The bill would also allow adults to grow six marijuana plants at home, with a per-household limit of twelve plants.  Adults would be allowed to keep up to eight ounces of harvested marijuana on hand.

Retail sales of marijuana would begin in 2019, utilizing much of the states existing medical marijuana system.  Retail marijuana sales would be subject to a 15% statewide sales tax, with local communities authorized to impose an additional 5% sales tax.

“It is either going to happen sooner or it is going to happen later and if it happens sooner we can realize the economic benefits now,” McCamley said at the bill’s introduction last month. “All of these things create long term job growth and help New Mexico out of this downward spiral we have had economically.”

Last year, lawmakers in the New Mexico Senate passed on the opportunity to send a similar legalization proposal to voters.

Polling data released in 2015 found that over 60% of New Mexicans support taxing and regulating the retail sale of marijuana to adults.

The full text of HB 89 can be found here.  New Mexico’s 2017 legislative session starts January 17 and ends in mid-March.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Marijuana is Now Legal in Maine as Question 1 Takes Effect

PORTLAND, ME — A voter-approved initiative to end marijuana prohibition in Maine officially takes effect today, making it legal for adults 21 and older to possess and grow limited amounts of marijuana.

“Maine voters made it clear that it’s time to end the failed and costly policy of punishing adults for their choice to responsibly use marijuana,” said Alysia Melnick, an attorney with the Yes on 1 campaign. “This is a win for personal privacy, personal responsibility, and civil liberties. Now that the law has taken effect, our efforts must turn to the timely and effective implementation of the remaining parts of the law, to ensure that all Maine taxpayers benefit.”

Under Question 1, which voters approved in November and Gov. Paul LePage certified on December 31, adults 21 years of age and older can legally possess up to two and a half ounces of marijuana, grow up to six flowering marijuana plants and 12 non-flowering plants, and possess the marijuana harvested from those plants inside their residence. It will remain illegal to use marijuana in public and to drive while impaired by marijuana. The law will not affect employers’ drug-testing policies or their rights to prohibit marijuana use by employees.

The Legislature is in the process of establishing a regulated system of marijuana cultivation and sales, which is currently scheduled to be up and running by February 1, 2018.

“Now that adults can legally possess and consume marijuana, they need places where they can legally purchase it,” said David Boyer, Maine political director for the Marijuana Policy Project, who served as campaign manager for the Yes on 1 campaign. “The next step is to take the criminal element out of production and sales. We are hopeful that the legislature will respect the will of the voters and work quickly to establish a sensible regulatory system.”

Marijuana is now legal for adults in eight states, including Maine, as well as in the District of Columbia. The measures approved by voters last November in California, Massachusetts, and Nevada took effect on November 9, December 15, and January 1, respectively. The laws in Alaska, Oregon, and D.C. were adopted in November 2014, and the laws in Colorado and Washington were adopted in 2012.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Maryland Lawmakers to Consider Legalizing Marijuana

ANNAPOLIS, MD — State lawmakers are rolling out legislation Monday that would regulate and tax cannabis similarly to alcohol in Maryland.

The proposal consists of two bills — a regulation bill and a tax bill — that will each be filed in the Senate and the House.

The regulation bill, sponsored by Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Jr. (D-Montgomery) and Del. Curt Anderson (D-Baltimore City), would make possession and home cultivation of limited amounts of cannabis legal for adults 21 years of age and older.

It would remain illegal to consume cannabis in public or drive under the influence. Prior convictions for adults 21 and older possessing or growing amounts of cannabis made lawful by the bill would be expunged.

The bill would also create a structure for licensing and regulating a limited number of cannabis retail stores, product manufacturers, testing facilities, cultivation facilities, and craft cultivators (that would grow smaller amounts of cannabis to sell only to cultivation facilities and product manufacturers).

The Comptroller of Maryland would be responsible for issuing licenses and creating rules, and the Department of Agriculture would be responsible for licensing and regulating the cultivation of industrial hemp. Cities and towns would have the authority to limit the location and number of cannabis establishments within their jurisdictions, as well as ban certain types of businesses.

The tax bill, sponsored by Madaleno in the Senate and Del. Mary Washington (D-Baltimore City) in the House, would create a structure for taxing cannabis and allocating the revenue. It would initially enact an excise tax of $30 per ounce, which would generally be paid by cultivators, and a 9% sales tax on retail cannabis sales, which is the same as the sales tax rate on alcohol.

Cannabis tax revenue would be used to cover the cost of administering the program, and then the remaining revenue would be allocated as follows: 50% for the community schools program; 25% for substance abuse treatment and prevention; 15% for workforce development programs; and 10% for combating impaired driving through public education and additional law enforcement training.

The legislation addresses concerns that have been raised about the licensing process for medical cannabis businesses. Specifically, it provides opportunities for small businesses, ensures the licensing process is subject to the Minority Business Enterprise Program, and requires outreach to diverse communities to ensure they are aware of new business opportunities.

It also contains strong provisions aimed at protecting public health and safety, such as mandatory product testing and labeling; restrictions on advertising and marketing; and rules limiting edible products to a single serving of THC and requiring opaque, child-resistant packaging.

Neither of the bills would affect the rights of patients under Maryland’s existing medical cannabis program, and taxes would only be applied to nonmedical cannabis.

Sixty-four percent of likely Maryland voters support making cannabis legal for adults, according to a Washington Post-University of Maryland poll conducted in September 2016.

“This legislation will effectively end the failed policy of cannabis prohibition in Maryland and replace it with a much more sensible system,” said Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Jr., vice-chair of the Senate Budget and Tax Committee and sponsor of the regulation and tax bills. “It establishes a thoughtful regulatory scheme and tax structure based on best practices and lessons learned from other states. Colorado and other states are raising millions of dollars in new revenue each month and creating thousands of good jobs. Maryland is not only missing out on the benefits, but enduring the many problems associated with prohibition.”

“African Americans are far more likely to be the subject of marijuana enforcement than other Marylanders,” said Sen. William C. Smith, primary co-sponsor of the regulation bill in the Senate. “Decriminalization reduces the number of Marylanders who are branded criminals, but it does not change the fact that marijuana laws are not enforced equally, and that people of color are disproportionately punished. Decriminalization also does nothing to stop the public safety issues that arise when a lucrative market is driven underground. It’s time to put marijuana sales behind the counter, and to let adults make their own decisions about using a substance that is safer than alcohol.”

“Tax revenue from cannabis sales will generate much-needed funds for our state. Our tax bill will allocate half of the revenues from cannabis taxes to the community schools program, which benefits high-poverty schools across Maryland. It will also provide funding for treatment services that are needed to address our state’s battle with opioid addiction,” said Del. Mary Washington, sponsor of the tax bill in the House.

“A strong and growing majority of Marylanders support ending cannabis prohibition. Rather than lagging behind our constituents, we need to get behind them and pass this legislation this year. Several states are now effectively regulating and taxing cannabis, and it is time for Maryland to join them,” added Del. Moon, a co-sponsor of the regulation and tax bills.

Maryland  lawmakers approved the medical use of marijuana and decriminalized the personal possession of under ten grams of marijuana in 2014.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Marijuana Possession Officially Becomes Legal in Maine on Monday

PORTLAND, ME — A voter-approved initiative to legalize marijuana in Maine will officially take effect on Monday, making it legal for adults 21 and older to possess and grow limited amounts of marijuana.

“The era of marijuana prohibition in Maine is finally coming to an end,” said David Boyer, Maine political director for the Marijuana Policy Project, who served as campaign manager for the Yes on 1 campaign. “Responsible adult marijuana consumers will no longer be harassed and treated like criminals. Police will be able to spend more time addressing serious crimes rather than punishing adults for using a substance that is safer than alcohol.”

Under Question 1, which voters approved in November and Gov. Paul LePage certified on December 31, adults 21 years of age and older can legally possess up to two and a half ounces of marijuana, grow up to six flowering marijuana plants and 12 non-flowering plants, and possess the marijuana harvested from those plants inside their residence. It will remain illegal to use marijuana in public and to drive while impaired by marijuana. The law will not affect employers’ drug-testing policies or their rights to prohibit marijuana use by employees.

The Legislature is in the process of establishing a regulated system of marijuana cultivation and sales, which is currently scheduled to be up and running by February 1, 2018.

“Now that adults can legally possess and consume marijuana, they need places where they can legally purchase it,” Boyer said. “The next step is to take the criminal element out of production and sales. We are hopeful that the Legislature will respect the will of the voters and work diligently to establish a sensible regulatory system.”

Marijuana is now legal for adults in eight states, including Maine, as well as in the District of Columbia. The measures approved by voters last November in California, Massachusetts, and Nevada took effect on November 9, December 15, and January 1, respectively. The laws in Alaska, Oregon, and D.C. were adopted in November 2014, and the laws in Colorado and Washington were adopted in 2012.

“Every time a state makes marijuana legal for adults, support for enacting similar laws grows in other states,” said Mason Tvert, director of communications for the Marijuana Policy Project, which backed the Question 1 campaign in Maine, as well as the successful campaigns in Alaska, California, Colorado, Massachusetts, and Nevada. “Legislatures around the country are considering proposals to regulate marijuana like alcohol this year. Why cling to a policy as wasteful, problematic, and antiquated as marijuana prohibition while your neighbors are moving forward with more sensible policies?”

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Maryland Marijuana Legalization Bills to be Introudced Monday

ANNAPOLIS, MD — Lawmakers in the Maryland House of Delegates are expected to introduce a combination of bills Monday that would legalize marijuana for adults.

Two bills are expected to be introduced in each chamber.  One proposal would make marijuana legal for adults 21 and older and regulate its production and sale similarly to alcohol, according to the Washington, DC based Marijuana Policy Project.

The other bill would enact taxes on non-medical marijuana sold in Maryland.

The bills are being sponsored in the Senate by Senators Richard S. Madaleno, Jr. —  the Vice Chair of the Senate Budget and Tax Committee —  and William C. Smith, JR, and in the House by Delegates Mary Washington and David Moon.

The four lawmakers will introduce the bills at a press conference Monday afternoon.

According to the Marijuana Policy Project, taxing recreational marijuana sales in Maryland could generate tens of millions of dollars in revenue per year for the state.

According to a January 2016 poll, 53% of Maryland voters support legalizing, regulating and taxing marijuana similarly to alcohol in Maryland. Only 43% were opposed.

Maryland  lawmakers approved the medical use of marijuana and decriminalized the personal possession of under ten grams of marijuana in 2014.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Activists Renew Push to Legalize Marijuana in Vermont

MONTPELIER, VT — A renewed push to legalize marijuana in Vermont will kick off Wednesday at the State House.

Members of the Vermont Coalition to Regulate Marijuana, including representatives from Vermonters for Criminal Justice Reform, ACLU-VT, and the Marijuana Policy Project, say Vermont should join other New England states that are removing legal penalties for adult possession and home cultivation of small amounts of marijuana.

Massachusetts and Maine are in the process of implementing voter-approved initiatives to make marijuana legal for adults and regulate it like alcohol.

Under current Vermont law, possession of up to one ounce of marijuana is a civil violation punishable by a fine of up to $200 for a first offense. Possession of one to two ounces of marijuana and cultivation of up to two marijuana plants are criminal misdemeanors punishable by a fine and up to six months in jail.

In the neighboring state of Massachusetts, it is now legal for adults 21 and older to possess up to one ounce of marijuana and grow up to six marijuana plants in their homes. In Maine, possession of up to 2.5 ounces and home cultivation of up to six plants will officially become legal on January 30.

“Massachusetts, Maine, and six other states have made marijuana legal for adult use,” said Matt Simon, New England Political Director for the Marijuana Policy Project. “It makes no sense for Vermont to continue punishing adults for using a substance that is safer than alcohol. Lawmakers should move swiftly to eliminate penalties for adult possession and limited home cultivation. They can then work to implement a reasonably regulated system that will take marijuana sales out of the illicit market.”

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Colorado: Marijuana Sales Surpass $1 Billion in 2016

DENVER, CO — Retail sales of marijuana in Colorado totaled well over $1 billion in the first ten months of 2016 and are estimated to reach $1.3 billion by year’s end, according to data provided by the state’s Department of Revenue.

The sales totals are an increase over last year, when retailers sold $996,184,788 in marijuana-related products.

Cannabis sales in 2016 have yielded an estimated $151 million in tax revenue to date, $40 million of which will be directed toward school construction.

Year-end totals for 2016 will not be available until February.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Bill Filed to Delay Maine’s Marijuana Legalization Law

AUGUSTA, ME — Bipartisan lawmakers in Maine have filed a bill that would delay most of the implementation of Question 1, which legalized marijuana in Maine, by over a year.

The bill, House Bill 88, was introduced Wednesday by state Rep.  Louis Luchini (D-Ellsworth) and Senate President Michael Thibodeau (R-Winterport).

The proposal would delay the implementation of most of Question 1 until February 1, 2018, including establishing a framework for a retail cannabis industry in the state, licencing of dispensaries, and possession of marijuana edibles by adults.

Proponents of the measure, which was approved by voters in November and successfully defeated a recount challenge by opponents, say lawmakers are “thumbing their nose at voters” by proposing the delay.

“Question 1 has nine months built-in to give regulators the time they need to craft responsible rules for legal marijuana sales. These politicians are clearly thumbing their nose at voters by proposing Maine delay this process before it has even started,” said David Boyer, Maine political director for the Marijuana Policy Project.

Personal possession of up to 2 1/2 ounces of marijuana will still become legal for adults later this month, but the bill prohibits adults from possessing edibles until February 2018.

As of January 30, adults 21 or older will be allowed to:

  • Use, possess or transport up to 2 1/2 ounces of marijuana;
  • Transfer, without remuneration, up to 2 1/2 ounces of marijuana and up to 6 immature plants or seedlings to a person who is 21 years of age or older;
  • Possess, grow, cultivate or transport up to 6 flowering marijuana plants, 12 immature plants and unlimited seedlings and possess all of the marijuana produced by the plants at the person’s residence;
  • Consume marijuana in a private residence.

The bill also makes the possession of marijuana by a minor a crime, unless they are authorized to possess marijuana for medical use.

HB 88, which can be read in full here, was filed as an emergency bill which would allow it go into effect immediately if at least two-thirds of the members in each chamber of the legislature approve it.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.

Massachusetts Lawmakers Want to Reduce Plant Limit, Raise Marijuana Taxes

BOSTON, MA — Lawmakers in Massachusetts are considering big changes for a voter-approved law that legalizes marijuana in the Bay State, including an increase in tax on retail marijuana sales and a reduction in plant limits on personal home grows.

Following decades of inaction on similar bills in the state legislature, voters in Massachusetts approved Question 4 in November, legalizing marijuana for adults.

Some provisions in the new law took effect in December, including personal possession and cultivation of up to six plants per adult, with a limit of 12 plants per household.  Soon after, however, lawmakers began tinkering with the new law, using a sparsely attended informal legislative session to pass a bill delaying other aspects of Question 4 by six months.  That bill was signed into law by anti-pot Republican Governor Charlie Baker just days later.

Now, the reason for the six month delay is clear: Lawmakers want to use the time to gut key provisions in the legalization law that could impact the effectiveness of the law.  Marijuana reform advocates worry this could lead to a continued thriving black market.

Under the measure, which was approved by 54 percent of voters on election day, home cultivation is allowed by adults, but is limited to six plants per adult or a total of 12 plants per household.

But according to Senate President Stanley Rosenberg, the legislature is considering reducing those plant limits.

“It’s legal now to have 12 plants in your home, but the advocates understand that this is likely to be debated in the process,” Rosenberg said Tuesday, speaking on WCAP radio.

Rosenberg claims that 12 plants could yield enough pot to roll 30 joints per day.

“According to the people who know a lot more about this than I do, they say that for someone who knows how to truly grow these plants and once you master it — which is not all that hard — 12 plants would produce about 30 marijuana cigarettes a day,” Rosenberg said.  “I mean it’s just it’s a very large quantity to have in your home at any given time.”

Jim Borghesani, spokesperson for the Yes on 4 campaign, disagrees, saying that reducing the number of plants adults are allowed to grow at home “would be a huge mistake.”

“I think it would clearly disrespect the will of the voters,” Borghesani says. “The voters were well aware of the at-home grow limit that was in the initiative and they voted for it by a very solid margin. Our home-grow limit is more restrictive than Colorado’s and the Legislature should not take any action based on no data that I can see, whatsoever, to justify such a move.”

While an experienced, talented grower could see yields of four ounces or more per plant every few months, most home grows produce much more modest yields as home cultivation is more of a hobby than a career.  And that’s if they’re lucky, says Peter Bernard, president of the Massachusetts Growers Advocacy Council.

“Most of the people who are going to try this are going to try and fail. Those who do succeed will average about two ounces a plant, and it takes about six months to grow beginning to end,” Bernard says. “If people think 12 plants will fuel a criminal enterprise — sure, they maybe could make a few bucks off friends and family — but it’s just not realistic. Twelve per household is not unreasonable.”

Lawmakers are also reportedly considering a significant increase in taxes imposed on retail sales, potentially doubling the tax approved by voters.

The language of Question 4 imposes an excise tax of 3.75% in addition to the state sales tax of 6.25%, adding a total 10% sales tax at the point of sale. Local communities have the option to add an additional 2% sales tax, making the total possible tax 12%.

Lawmakers have suggested increasing more than doubling marijuana taxes in an effort to boost revenue generated by marijuana sales. A Senate committee has suggested a marijuana sales tax that could range from 10 to 20%, an excise tax on growers of 5 to 15 percent, and allowing communities to optionally add on a 5 percent tax.

At least one lawmaker, Rep. Lenny Mirra (R-West Newbury), has cautioned against such a drastic tax increase.

“If we set the price too high above the black market, then people will revert to getting it on the street,” Mirra says. “Getting rid of illegal sales is one of the reasons people voted to approve it.”

That’s the intent behind the taxes outlined in the ballot measure, which represent the lowest retail marijuana taxes in the country.

“We wanted the tax to be low enough to fund the regulation and administration of the initiative, but also to undercut the illicit market,” Borghesani said, noting that the measure allows for an annual review on sales taxes.

Under Question 4, the Cannabis Control Commission, which will oversee the cannabis industry, has the authority to review marijuana taxes annually and suggest that lawmakers raise or lower them.

“They should allow the system to get up and running and then decide if they need to adjust the tax rate,” Borghesani says.

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Thank you for visiting MDMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Maryland. Our Mission at the Maryland Medical Marijuana Certification Clinics (MDMMCC) is to provide the certification necessary for qualified patients to obtain Medical Marijuana in compliance with the Maryland Medical Marijuana Laws in the State of Maryland.  MDMMCC will have offices open throughout Maryland.